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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Illustrated by T. H. Robinson & C. Pears

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Illustrated by T. H. Robinson & C. Pears

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Illustrated by T. H. Robinson & C. Pears

Bewertungen:
3/5 (1,256 Bewertungen)
Länge:
132 Seiten
1 Stunde
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 10, 2014
ISBN:
9781473393936
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Alice in Wonderland' is the best known work of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832 - 1898), better known by his pen name, 'Lewis Carroll'. Telling the tale of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by surreal and anthropomorphic creatures, the book was a huge commercial success on its initial publication in 1865. It was followed by its sequel, 'Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There', in 1871. The books play at the heart of logical problems and literary nonsense – giving the narrative lasting popularity with adults and children alike. This edition of the 'Alice in Wonderland' story is illustrated by Charles Pears (1873 - 1958), and Thomas Heath Robinson (1869 - 1954). Both immensely talented 'Golden Age Illustrators', the two men collaborated on this work – producing a beautifully varied volume. Charles Pears was famed as both a painter and illustrator, and contributed to many periodicals, as well as producing frequent 'marine' paintings. T. H. Robinson was the brother of William Heath, and Charles Robinson; all of whom became imaginative and highly-respected illustrators. The artwork of Pears and Robinson is presented alongside the text – further refining Carroll's masterful storytelling. This book forms part of our 'Pook Press' imprint, celebrating the golden age of illustration in children's literature.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 10, 2014
ISBN:
9781473393936
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, aka Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, deacon and photographer. He is most famous for his timeless classics, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. His work falls within the genre of 'literary nonsense', and he is renowned for his use of word play and imagination. Carroll's work has been enjoyed by many generations across the globe.


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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Illustrated by T. H. Robinson & C. Pears - Lewis Carroll

Alice in Wonderland.

CHAPTER I.

DOWN THE RABBIT-HOLE.

ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, and what is the use of a book, thought Alice, without pictures or conversations?

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late! (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

Alice grew very tired of sitting by her sister.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and book-shelves; here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled ORANGE MARMALADE, but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody underneath, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

Alice ran across the field after it.

Well! thought Alice to herself, after such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house! (Which was very likely true.)

Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time? she said aloud. I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think—for, you see, Alice had learned several things of this sort in her lessons in the school-room, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over—yes, that’s about the right distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to? (Alice had not the slightest idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but she thought they were nice grand words to say.)

She took down a jar from one of the shelves.

Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The Antipathies, I think"—she was rather glad there was no one listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word—but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma’am, is this New Zealand or Australia? (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke—fancy curtseying as you’re falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. Dinah’ll miss me very much tonight, I should think! (Dinah was the cat.) I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I’m afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that’s very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder? And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? and sometimes, Do bats eat cats? for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her very earnestly, Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat? when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was dark overhead; before her another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, Oh, my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting! She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.

Suddenly she came upon a three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it but a tiny golden key, and Alice’s first idea was that this might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!

Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her

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Was die anderen über Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Illustrated by T. H. Robinson & C. Pears denken

3.0
1256 Bewertungen / 186 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Many of the reviews on this site do not relate to the Salvador Dali illustrated book, but rather to another illustrator. Very Confusing.I love Alice's imaginative adventures and her increasing confidence as she accepts her changing size and bizarre circumstances.Yet, just as I did not enjoy the treatment of animals in a cruel way - the flamingoes, hedgehogs, guinea pigs - when I first read the book as a child and, although I was happy with the final resolution of the Queen and her deck of cards, the constant "Off with their heads!" was and is still annoying.Dali's paintings remain dramatic and an eternal evocative mystery. So good that this book has come to all of us!
  • (4/5)
    I plan to read Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy and thought it might be interesting to reread the book, this time in French. >My first observation was that the translator did a good job and most of the book was translated well - at least to the limits of my memory. Then I did notice some shortcomings, for instance the wordplay in the mouse poem relating the mouse's tail to the tale being told just didn't work in French. However, the translator did include good footnotes. Here, he explained differences in the French and English version. He also added some historical notes that I found added value to the story. This included some symbology that I was completely unaware of. Some of the jokes and puns were, if my memory serves, and perhaps were replaced with new or similar ones taking advantage of the language differences.Overall, it is a quick read, delightful and imaginative and well worth some time spent.
  • (5/5)
    Why do you want another copy of Alice in Wonderland when you already have at least three copies and other abbreviated versions? Well, it was really for the illustrations. I really like Helen Oxenbury's work and here was a great collection of her work for $5 at the local markets....who could resist. OK, I haven't read the story again. Actually, I never liked the story as a kid. Adults always seemed to be foisting it on me and I thought it was all very weird and unbelievable and full of tricky insider jokes for adults. I shared a flat (apartment) once, however, with a guy who was very keen on Alice in Wonderland and was always citing stuff from it ....like..."Words mean precisely what I want them to mean ...neither more nor less"and...."Would you please tell me which way I ought to go from here?"....That depends a good deal on where you want to get to", said the Cat. I don't much care where ..." said Alice. "Then it doesn't matter which way you go", said the Cat. it It was only as an adult that I kind of got interested in the author who was a lecturer in Mathematics and logic at Christ's College Oxford. He was Charles Dodgson who went under the pen name of Lewis Carroll. So the book is full of logical questions, paradoxes, illogical answers and mathematical quirks....... But Charles Dodgson seemed to have a rather unhealthy interest in young girls. I recall seeing a book of his that I think contained photos of young girls. (He became interested in photography and about 60% of his photos were of young girls. Seemed just slightly creepy to me.....but give him the benefit of the doubt. Maybe he just liked writing stories to entertain. He published Alice in Wonderland in 1865 and it became increasingly popular. Anyway, that's not why I bought the book. I bought it for the illustrations and they really dazzle. Helen Oxenbury has a wonderful way with perspective and a slightly cartoonish drawing style that is perfectly suited to this particular book. There are some of her pencil sketches and a few watercolours combined with pencil backgrounds. All in all it works very well. I think she has captured the spirit of Alice rather well. In many of the versions I've seen , Alice comes across as a rather bossy and determined little girl but her she is confident but sympathetic. And a rather likeable character from the drawings. Needless to say, she is a modernised Alice and, I think has much more appeal than the older "tougher" Alices.A great version of the book.
  • (4/5)
    Delightfully fun, whimsically amusing and what an imagination! Between the outlandish characters, the silly puns and the play with logic, it is easy to see how this book is such a great story for both children and adults. Obviously, a reader needs to love - or at least appreciate - the nonsensical fun to fully enjoy this story, especially given the caricatures and the mayhem that is Wonderland. I can see where some adult readers may revisit this one for nostalgic childhood reasons, but I think I probably appreciate the story more as a adult reader, than I would have reading it as a young girl. Overall, very happy to have finally read this children's classic.
  • (4/5)
    I don't feel like the modern illustration fits with the classic work for some reason. Otherwise the images are beautifully done.
  • (3/5)
    A good way to introduce a child to the idea that words and sentences can have multiple meaning depending upon the context. A sort of point-of-view pontification.
  • (5/5)
    Great Illustration
  • (2/5)
    The problem is this particular edition (Bookbyte digital), which is not complete, and does not include the introductory poems.
  • (2/5)
    Ugh, I hate nonsense books. I get that this is for kids and the whole premise is fun nonsense. When Alice falls asleep she goes down into a rabbit hole and enters Wonderland, a place where everything is fun and nonsense. There is no point to anything and everyone is weird and can you tell how much I dislike this book. There is no plot, just a dumb kid named Alice, wandering around Wonderland talking to animals and packs of cards, playing croquet with flamingos and the like. Totally bonkers.
  • (3/5)
    There really is a lot of nonsense in this.
  • (4/5)
    It's hard to review 2 books at once. I loved the first book. But I was not impressed with the second. Like many, I've been spoiled by movies so I was very disappointed to find out the Jabberwocky was just a poem. I was also surprised at how young Alice truly is in the books. All-in-all was an interesting read.
  • (3/5)
    Alice in Wonderland vertelt het verhaal van de kleine Alice die in slaap sukkelt bij een uitstapje en in haar droom een wit konijn achterna rent door een pijp. Ze komt in een volledig andere wereld terecht en wordt geconfronteerd met de meest vreemde schepsels: eigenaardige dieren en levende kaarten, enzovoort. Allemaal zijn ze druk met zichzelf bezig en niet echt er op uit Alice beter te leren kennen. Die vraagt zichzelf trouwens geregeld af wie ze eigenlijk is. De gekste gebeurtenissen doen zich voor en de gekste teksten worden de lezer voorgeschoteld, tot Alice uiteindelijk weer ontwaakt.Achter de spiegel borduurt voort op dat thema, zelfs in een nog hogere versnelling. Alice geraakt in een spiegel en komt buiten het zichtsveld weer in een vreemde wereld terecht. Vooral de schaakfiguren beheersen hier de zaak. Er zijn andermaal tal van zonderlinge figuren. De dialogen hebben nog meer dubbele bodems dan tevoren. Maar het geheel geeft een zo mogelijk nog verwarder en daardoor ondoorgrondelijker indruk dan het vorige verhaal. Op de duur wordt het - zeker bij een lectuur voor kinderen - gewoon ontoegankelijk. Het einde is vrij abrupt.
  • (4/5)
    Very nicely read. Enjoyable audiobook.
  • (4/5)
    hard to believe i've never read this but wonderful story
  • (5/5)
    I once read Alice in Wonderland when I was younger and I thought it was okay. Not amazing, but okay. I reread it now a few years later in this edition and I think it was the illustrations that did it for me. I really enjoyed the story. The pictures brought so much to the story. I would recommend this edition. 5 out of 5 stars.
  • (2/5)
    An Exercise in Insanity

    This book was insane. The adventures she had and the creatures she met...It all sounded like what a bad acid trip would be like.

    I'm honestly not sure I enjoyed it. This may require a re-read in the future.
  • (3/5)
    It was okayy..
  • (3/5)
    Alice in Wonderland vertelt het verhaal van de kleine Alice die in slaap sukkelt bij een uitstapje en in haar droom een wit konijn achterna rent door een pijp. Ze komt in een volledig andere wereld terecht en wordt geconfronteerd met de meest vreemde schepsels: eigenaardige dieren en levende kaarten, enzovoort. Allemaal zijn ze druk met zichzelf bezig en niet echt er op uit Alice beter te leren kennen. Die vraagt zichzelf trouwens geregeld af wie ze eigenlijk is. De gekste gebeurtenissen doen zich voor en de gekste teksten worden de lezer voorgeschoteld, tot Alice uiteindelijk weer ontwaakt.Achter de spiegel borduurt voort op dat thema, zelfs in een nog hogere versnelling. Alice geraakt in een spiegel en komt buiten het zichtsveld weer in een vreemde wereld terecht. Vooral de schaakfiguren beheersen hier de zaak. Er zijn andermaal tal van zonderlinge figuren. De dialogen hebben nog meer dubbele bodems dan tevoren. Maar het geheel geeft een zo mogelijk nog verwarder en daardoor ondoorgrondelijker indruk dan het vorige verhaal. Op de duur wordt het - zeker bij een lectuur voor kinderen - gewoon ontoegankelijk. Het einde is vrij abrupt.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book! Wonderfully illustrated!
  • (4/5)
    This edition contains both "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland" and "Through The Looking-glass" As with the general understanding of the two stories is mainly presented to today's culture through the Disney's animated classic, most people know of both these stories. Upon reading them both, I noticed the elements that were used from each of them. A majority of it was obviously from "Alice's Adventures" with only some pieces from "Looking-glass" added.
    In my opinion "Alice's Adventures" was much more enjoyable when I read it. I enjoyed the poetic elements in "Looking-glass" but for overall likability, I side with "Alice's Adventures"
  • (5/5)
    Its been many years since I last read this and it was better than I remember it being and more nonsensical. I think my memory of the book had been warped by the movies (just a bit crap especially the most recent Johnny Depp one!).
  • (3/5)
    While the story is creative, it is also a lot of nonsense. Albeit is supposed to be a dream, it is rather bizarre. I find it odd that the story has such renown. I mildly recommend this book mainly for the value of being familiar with the story because it is so well known.
  • (5/5)
    I won't even try to write a review. Just to say not sure why I haven't read this for at least fifteen years.
  • (4/5)
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is not one of my favorite books. But this edition has really marvelous graphics that improve upon the story. If you like this book, this edition would certainly be worth adding to your collection as it is beautiful.
  • (4/5)
    Okay, so we all know this story, most of us know it very well. It's an absurd children's book, and as I listened, I kept thinking about how much my preschool aged granddaughters would love the overall silliness of this classic.

    I listened to the new Audible production performed by Scarlett Johannson. I was very impressed with her ability to change voices, which was so extreme, I wondered how much of it was done in post-production. If it is all her, with no electronic modification, I'm very impressed. Movie directors should be able to utilize her voice skills for so many characters.

    At any rate, the rating is primarily from the performance. Surprisingly, I am not a fan of the story at all (I'm not a fan of absurdist literature - it's like bizarro books today: completely senseless). Oh well, to each his own.

    I'd recommend this for people who enjoy classic children's literature and for those who enjoy hearing a book skillfully read.
  • (5/5)
    Addressing strange and difficult issues as time, size and perspective, transformation and introducing the game theory almost a hundred years before it was presented as a mathematical idea in the conventional way, amongst other philosophically difficult ideas - and then engage children successfully, is a great achievement - leaving the readers of all ages curious about the nature of our existence - as compared to other living matter - as well as the nature of our observation of ourselves and everything outside ourselves. Carroll made a sensible, highly readable, enjoyable story out of (what for most people) is nonsense, no less.Wonderful reading.
  • (3/5)
    It was fun and bizarre and I'm happy I read it.
  • (3/5)
    Listened to this on CD. Alice's adventures after she falls down a rabbit hole chasing the white rabbit. She runs into several other characters, the cheshire cat, the queen of hearts, the tortise, and has quite an imaginative adventure in wonderland.
  • (5/5)
    In my opinion this is a good picture book. The illustrations really enhance the story and make the reader believe they are in the story.The illustrations really fit the storyline and are filled with great detail! The front cover is a perfect example. On the cover is Alice, the rabbit, mad hater, the cheshire cat, the liquid that makes Alice get big and small, and the caterpillar! Before even reading this story, the reader is curious to see what is going to happen in the story that bring about all these add creatures. Another aspect of the book that i really enjoyed was the language. Throughout this piece of literature, descriptive language is used to help make the reader feel as if they are actually in the story. ""Oh, my ears and whiskers! The Queen will be angry," it said, and hurried off. Alice wanted to see what would happen to it: so she ran and ran, ti; she found herself tumbling down through a rabbit hole after it." When reading this I picture the rabbit with a worried expression on his face and Alice chasing after him. I also see Alice tripping on a tree root and falling into a rabbits hole. Along with the detailed illustrations, this passage makes the reader feel as if they are there watching. The big idea of this story is that dreaming is an amazing and wonderful thing where your imagination can run free.
  • (5/5)
    Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is a classic that everyone should read. His play with words, his insane universe with amazing characters, and his symbolism make this a work that can be read over and over. Each time I read it I discover new things, and look at it in a different way. Truly an amazing work by an amazing man.