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Type 2 Diabetes: Essentials: Expert And Practical Advice; Your Most Vital Questions Answered

Type 2 Diabetes: Essentials: Expert And Practical Advice; Your Most Vital Questions Answered

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Type 2 Diabetes: Essentials: Expert And Practical Advice; Your Most Vital Questions Answered

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5/5 (2 Bewertungen)
Länge:
69 Seiten
52 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 28, 2014
ISBN:
9781859594872
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

This Essentials book answers all the key questions asked about Type 2 diabetes in succinct, accessible and up-to-date form. There are two main types of diabetes and you may not be sure which you have. In general, people with Type 1 diabetes are usually young, develop symptoms quite rapidly and need insulin treatment immediately. In contrast, Type 2 diabetes tends to occur in people who are over thirty and above average weight (although there are exceptions). The onset tends to be gradual and the initial treatment is through diet and tablets. If your diabetes has been treated this way, this book is for you. This introductory guide answers 50 key questions asked by people with Type 2 diabetes and their families. It provides a summary of symptoms and treatments, and offers practical advice on living life with Type 2 diabetes. There is a glossary at the end of this book.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 28, 2014
ISBN:
9781859594872
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


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Buchvorschau

Type 2 Diabetes - Dr. Charles Fox

Type 2 Diabetes: Essentials

Your Fifty Key Questions Answered

Dr Charles Fox and Dr Anne Kilvert

Contents

A note for the reader

1 What is diabetes?

2 Diet and exercise

3 Treatment without insulin

4 Moving onto insulin

5 Monitoring and control

6 Long-term care and complications

7 Glossary

A note for the reader

This Essentials book answers all the key questions asked about Type 2 diabetes in succinct, accessible and up-to-date form. lf you want more information than we can give you in this book,  you might be interested in Type 2 Diabetes: Answers at your Fingertips, by Dr Charles Fox and Dr Anne Kilvert, published by Class Health (www.class.co.uk).

There are two main types of diabetes and you may not be sure which you have. In general, people with Type 1 diabetes are usually young, develop symptoms quite rapidly and need insulin treatment immediately. In contrast, Type 2 diabetes tends to occur in people who are over thirty and above average weight (although there are exceptions). The onset tends to be gradual and the initial treatment is through diet and tablets.  If your diabetes has been treated this way, this book is for you.

There is a glossary at the end of this book. However, you will find that it contains more terms than you will find within the body of the book. More about these topics can be found in the parent volume, Type 2 Diabetes: Answers at your fingertips. You will also find the Diabetes UK website (www.diabetes.org.uk) very helpful.

1 What is diabetes?

1. What happens in diabetes?

When someone has diabetes, they are unable to control their blood glucose level, which rises above normal. Type 2 diabetes usually appears in people over the age of 40 but is becoming more common in younger age groups as a result of the increase in obesity in the general population.

Type 2 diabetes may go undetected for many years and because people do not always feel unwell, it may be discovered by chance at a routine medical. It usually responds well to diet or tablets. There may be mild symptoms such as thirst, tiredness and passing excess urine, which should disappear once treatment is established.

Diabetes is often detected following a routine blood or urine test for glucose and it may therefore exist for many years without being discovered. People in this situation often feel perfectly well at the time diabetes is diagnosed. Unfortunately, undetected diabetes may over a period of years lead to complications affecting eyes, nerves and blood vessels.

2. Why do people get Type 2 diabetes?

People develop Type 2 diabetes when they cannot produce enough insulin to control their blood glucose level. In people who do not have diabetes, insulin is produced in the pancreas and released into the blood as soon as the blood glucose level starts to rise after eating. Insulin travels straight from the pancreas to the liver where it has the important role of regulating glucose production and the storage of glucose as glycogen. The level of glucose in the blood then falls and, as it does so, insulin production is switched off, allowing glucose to be released from stores in the liver. In people who do not have diabetes, this sensitive system keeps the amount of glucose in the blood at a steady level.

In diabetes, this process is faulty. People with Type 2 diabetes can still produce some insulin but not in adequate amounts to keep the blood glucose level normal. This is because their insulin does not work properly (a condition called ‘insulin resistance’).

Figure 1 Diagram showing the location of the pancreas

3. I have been found to have Type 2 diabetes. Is there anything I could have done to prevent this from happening to me?

Because of the epidemic of Type 2 diabetes in many parts of the world, a lot of work has been done to see if this condition can be prevented. Most people with Type 2 diabetes go through a phase of pre-diabetes, when they have slightly raised blood sugar levels without having full-blown diabetes. Large studies have been carried out in China, USA and Finland to see if training people to make lifestyle changes can prevent diabetes. In all three countries, the results were striking and showed that by restricting food intake and taking part in exercise programmes, diabetes could be held at bay. The recommended exercise was at least half an hour of fast walking or equivalent on five days a week. In the American study, some participants were asked to take a drug called metformin which increases insulin sensitivity and this also helped to delay

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