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The Snow Queen

The Snow Queen

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The Snow Queen

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (26 Bewertungen)
Länge:
48 Seiten
45 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
28. Apr. 2015
ISBN:
9781443440332
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

With a single kiss, a young maid saves her beloved from the Snow Queen’s icy imprisonment. When splinters from an evil troll’s magic mirror get into the heart and eye of Kai, he is tricked into accompanying the Snow Queen to her palace, and only the innocence and kindness of Gerda’s heart can save him.

The inspiration for Frozen, Hans Christian’s Andersen’s “The Snow Queen” is one of the most beloved fairy tales in history.

HarperPerennialClassics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
28. Apr. 2015
ISBN:
9781443440332
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish author and poet best remembered for his fairy tales, both original and retold, including the beloved classics "Thumbelina," "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Fir Tree," "The Steadfast Tin Soldier," "The Princess and the Pea," "The Red Shoes," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Snow Queen." 


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Buchvorschau

The Snow Queen - Hans Christian Andersen

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The Snow Queen

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

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Contents

The Snow Queen

About the Author

About the Series

Copyright

About the Publisher

The Snow Queen

A Tale in Seven Stories

FIRST STORY

Which Has to Do with a Mirror and its Fragments

Now then! We will begin. When the story is done you shall know a great deal more than you do know.

He was a terribly bad hobgoblin, a goblin of the very wickedest sort and, in fact, he was the devil himself. One day the devil was in a very good humor because he had just finished a mirror which had this peculiar power: everything good and beautiful that was reflected in it seemed to dwindle to almost nothing at all, while everything that was worthless and ugly became most conspicuous and even uglier than ever. In this mirror the loveliest landscapes looked like boiled spinach, and the very best people became hideous, or stood on their heads and had no stomachs. Their faces were distorted beyond any recognition, and if a person had a freckle it was sure to spread until it covered both nose and mouth.

That’s very funny! said the devil. If a good, pious thought passed through anyone’s mind, it showed in the mirror as a carnal grin, and the devil laughed aloud at his ingenious invention.

All those who went to the hobgoblin’s school—for he had a school of his own—told everyone that a miracle had come to pass. Now, they asserted, for the very first time you could see how the world and its people really looked. They scurried about with the mirror until there was not a person alive nor a land on earth that had not been distorted.

Then they wanted to fly up to heaven itself, to scoff at the angels, and our Lord. The higher they flew with the mirror, the wider it grinned. They could hardly manage to hold it. Higher they flew, and higher still, nearer to heaven and the angels. Then the grinning mirror trembled with such violence that it slipped from their hands and fell to the earth, where it shattered into hundreds of millions of billions of bits, or perhaps even more. And now it caused more trouble than it did before it was broken, because some of the fragments were smaller than a grain of sand and these went flying throughout the wide world. Once they got in people’s eyes they would stay there. These bits of glass distorted everything the people saw, and made them see only the bad side of things, for every little bit of glass kept the same power that the whole mirror had possessed.

A few people even got a glass splinter in their hearts, and that was a terrible thing, for it turned their hearts into lumps of ice. Some of the fragments were so large that they were used as window panes—but not the kind of window through which you should look at your friends. Other pieces were made into spectacles, and evil things came to pass when people put them on to see clearly and to see justice done. The fiend was so tickled by it all that he laughed till his sides were sore. But fine bits of the glass are still flying through the air, and now you shall hear what happened.

SECOND STORY

A Little Boy and a Little Girl

In the big city it was so crowded with houses and people that few found room for even a small garden and most people had to be content with a flowerpot, but two poor children who lived there managed to have a garden that was a little bigger

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4.4
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  • (4/5)
    This is one of the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales that I was not very familiar with. In this story Gerda and Kay are best friends who do everything together. When a piece of a cursed mirror falls into Kay's eye and another settles in his heart, he becomes a different person. He is mean to Gerda and does not play with her anymore. When he is sledding with his friends, he grabs onto a white sleigh and is taken off by the Snow Queen. When he does not return home that night, Gerda sets off to find him. She has many adventures and meets both people and animals that help her in her quest. One quote I love from this story is:

    "I can't give the girl more power than she already has! Can't you see how powerful she is? Can't you see how people and animals all serve her? And how far she's got in the world just on her own two feet?"

    This is a story of friendship, perseverance and doing what feels right. I just wish that there had been more information about what happened when Kay went to live with the snow queen and what happened to him there.

    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    The Snow Queen is about a set of friends named, Kai and Gerda, who do everything together before the snow queen blows ice glass into kai's eyes and heart. Gerda goes on a dangerous journey to the snow queen's palace to save Kai despite his change in behavior and saves him with her warm hearted love. This is a good fantasy because there are trolls and evil snow queens involved also a young child goes on a journey by herself through many dangerous places without proper tools and clothing. would use this in intermediate grades may be too intense and scary for younger kids despite its happy ending. illustrations: fine-line pen with ink and dyes applied over a detailed pencil drawing that was then erased.
  • (4/5)
    This is a lovely reading of Andersen's story of Gerda and her friend Kai, who becomes contaminated by the shards of a demon-made magic mirror, and succumbs to the lure of the Snow Queen.

    Gerda sees the change in her friend when he is affected by the shards, and when he vanishes, she will not believe that he is dead. She sets off on quest to find him, armed chiefly with her courage, loyalty, and good heart.

    Something that may seem unexpected to those who grew up on Disney versions of fairy tales is that nearly all the strong characters here, both good and ill, at least the human ones, are women and girls.

    Julia Whelan is an excellent narrator, with a delightful voice, and she strikes exactly the right tone in reading this.

    Recommended.

    This book is free on Audible until January 31, 2015.
  • (4/5)
    I shouldn't have read this as an audiobook - the illustration potential must be astounding. Even still, it's a great story about love and the beauty of life. Having read about Anderson's personal life, it's interesting to see the incredible beauty he was able to see the everyday and the magic he was able to pull from thin-air.
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully illustrated.
  • (4/5)
    I had never read The Snow Queen before this, but the cover just drew me in and I HAD to do it.. The story was fantastical and at parts heartbreaking, with another good theme to it. I enjoyed this novella very much and now I understand all the remakes and shows and movies that have borrowed from this story. Absolutely brilliant. I would recommend this book. 4 out of 5 stars.
  • (3/5)
    I got this book for free from Audible. Not my favorite Andersen tale, but it wasn't so bad, specially for a "Christmas tale". It's a cute story, though I think it's better suited for younger people. You can take a couple of interesting aspects from this book though. First of all, the lack of a damsel in distress. The main character is a girl that tries to find her best friend after he has been hit with a glass shard that turned his heart cold. She does get her share of help, but she is in no way a damsel in distress. I also enjoyed the entities she found on her way, her determination and strength. And, of course, there is the weight of friendship instead of the whole "true love" thing, which is absolutely lovely.
    Anyway, it's worth checking it out.
  • (4/5)
    Really enjoyed the book reading by Julia Whelan and really enjoyed the book. Will be recommending it to all my friends and family.
  • (5/5)
    The only reason I got myself a copy of The Snow Queen - and then I mean this particular edition, is cos I love Sanna Annukka (her illustrations, that is). Though now I've gotta admit I had forgotten how lovely this tale is! Really enjoyed it!
  • (3/5)
    My thoughts on this book are quite tangled.

    On one hand I loved the sci-fi elements of this book. A world which is periodically reduced to a "primitive" state, controlled by the Hegemony for the purpose of harvesting it's most precious resource.

    On the other is the drama surrounding the Winter Queen, her Summer clone and their joint love.

    Honestly I would have enjoyed the book with far less of the latter and more of the former. The dramatical parts of the book really dragged for me. The whole redemption of Sparks thing was a joke and the treatment of Jerusha was unnecessary. Moon really frustrated me at times.

    I would have like a lot more on the sibyls, the mers and the Old Empire. I think the book could have benefited more from those subjects and if it dropped the incest off a bit. I found that to be quite odd and a little disturbing. I would have preferred Moon stay with BZ and Sparks to get the punishment he deserved.

    Overall though it wasn't a bad book but I won't be reading any more of the series.

  • (5/5)
    I don't know why I got away from this book like I did. It shouldn't take that long to read, and it's very, very good.

    I love that the main characters in the book are strong women. I love that the world building is fully fleshed out. I love that it's a coming-of-age story that's not weak. I just kinda loved it all.

    The story takes place on Tiamat (also, yeah, loving Vinge's use of names), which is a planet in the "Hegemony", that due to an astronomical fluke is "available" to the Hegemony for 150 of every 300 years.

    When the Hegemony has access to Tiamat, the techno-forward, environment destorying "Winters" rule the planet (complete with it's Winter Queen) and during the inaccessible time, the primitive nature worshiping "Summers" rule.

    This story takes place at the time of transition. The Winter Queen will do whatever it takes to keep her power, the Hegemony will do what it needs to to make sure that the transition happens (for reasons that are revealed, brilliantly, in the book). Arienrhod is the titular Snow Queen, a hard and scheming woman, who is not one dimension (for a refreshing change). Moon, the second of three main characters, is a product of Arienrhod's scheming, she is a Summer, who has the calling to become a sibyl. Thanks to her calling, she must end her relationship with her cousin, and their estrangement begins her journey that takes her off-world and then to the heart of the Hegemonic city. Jerusha PalaThion is a female "blue", basically the Hegemonic law enforcement. She struggles, dealing with the discrimination dealt to her from the men of her department, as she tries to unravel whatever it is that Arienrhod is up to (and she's pretty sure she's up to something). She's probably my favorite character in the book (right after Arienrhod).

    I've seen numerous comparisons to other big works of sci-fi (most notably Dune, and to be honest, I think there is some truth to some of the comparisons). And while this does use some major themes/trops, it's also refreshing with it's strong female component.

    Vinge's prose is also fantastic, and her world building is absolutely complete. The scraps of science and the reasoning behind motives is interesting and fascinating. Is it the most original thing ever? Probably not, but it's easily one of the best books I've ever read. As soon as it's available on kindle, I'll own it.
  • (4/5)
    Wow, I bought this book in 2002 (it still had the price tag on it from the Glasgow book shop where I found it). Almost done with my to-read shelf. :) This novel is set on a planet that has a sharp division between the primitive Summers and the high tech Winters. The Winter Queen is nearing the end of her reign and she's plotting to extend it after the Change comes by making a clone of herself and having the girl raised as a Summer. But Moon becomes a sybil, and the cousin she loves does not, and this event launches them on widely disparate tragectories. Moon ends up learning what the domineering Hegemony doesn't want the people of their planet to know and fights to be reunited with Sparks. He, meanwhile has gone to the capital city and fell in among the Winters, becomes jaded and hard especially after he's faced with the uncanny resemblance of the queen to his lost love. There's a lot of political machination going on, as well as emotional upheaval, and I found the world fascinating. My only quibble is that the queen, despite all her plottings, didn't really feel like she truly threaten any of the main characters, just manipulate them. But that manipulation ruined lives emotionally, physically, mentally, morally etc. A female police officer has a secondary story, complete with struggles in a male dominated society, and despite empathising with her, it felt tacked on and that she was only there to be useful to the main characters (I think the butt on the cover is supposed to belong to her, it was part of the image I felt I had to obscure when I was reading it in public). The core ideas were interesting, but a few tweaks would have made it even better.
  • (5/5)
    Mild spoilers follow.The Snow Queen is an epic story set on a distant planet, about the fall of one queen and the rise of another. The novel is based on the fairy tale by Hans Christian Anderson and tackles such weighty themes as immortality and the power of knowledge.The strength of this novel lies in its world building. The planet of Tiamat is a fully realized world, an ocean-covered planet orbiting twin suns. Two tribes live there: the sea-going, island-dwelling Summers, characterized by a fear of technology and a superstitious worship of their sea goddess, the Lady; and the Winters, who live in the Northern regions and the shell-shaped city of Carbuncle, embrace technology and freely trade with the Offworlders.Tiamat’s culture and history are shaped by the oddities of its planetary and solar system orbits. Every 150 years, it moves closest to one of its suns, bringing a long summer to the planet. This signals a complete power shift, as the Summers move north from the equatorial regions and the Snow Queen abdicates to the Summer Queen. In fact, the Snow Queen and her consort are sacrificed to the sea in a paganistic ritual following a multi-day festival similar to Carnivale or Mardi Gras.During the same period, the planet orbits close to and then away from a black hole that enables interstellar travel to other planets in an empire called the Hegemony. While Tiamat is close to the black hole, the Hegemony maintains a presence there, sharing technology with the ruling Winters. When the planet starts to orbit away, the Offworlders must leave, and they destroy all technology before they go to keep Tiamat from advancing too much without their influence and perhaps declaring independence. The Offworlders’ interest in Tiamat comes down to the planet’s one valuable asset: immortal sea creatures called Mers. The Mers’ blood, called the Water of Life, can be harvested to provide ever-lasting youth.The Snow Queen takes place at the cusp of this great Change. The 150-year-old Snow Queen, Arienrhod, has been scheming to maintain her power after the Summers take over. Her plan involves cloning herself, producing her Summer twin, Moon. But even though the two look alike, they are diametric opposites in personality. Arienrhod is self-absorbed and power-hungry, emotionless in her extreme age, a manipulator of everyone she meets. Her young twin Moon is compassionate and empathetic, someone who inspires adulation and devotion in everyone she comes across.Moon has become a sibyl, a prophetess who can answer any question. Through this power she taps into an ancient network of knowledge and discovers the true significance of the Mers and why they must be protected. This prompts her to compete for the mask of the Summer Queen and the power to, as she puts it, change the Change.Moon and Arienrhod are both in love with Moon’s cousin, Sparks. His character is probably the novel’s biggest flaw, because it seems implausible that these two strong women would go to such lengths for him. Sparks is narcissistic, petulant and tends to make rash decisions or sulk when things don’t go his way. His character doesn’t improve or change much over the course of the story. He commits atrocious crimes, witnessed by Moon, who still wants to be with him even when much more attractive options are available to her.This is a long novel that probably could have been a good deal shorter, but there is enough action and interesting dynamics to keep the reader involved. In fact, I would like to know more — about the ruling planet of Kharamough, for instance, and its rigid class structure, which we visit only briefly. Clearly, the novel is setting up for a sequel, since many conflicts are left open-ended and the resolution is not quite satisfying as a result.The Snow Queen won the Hugo Award in 1981. The sequel, The Summer Queen, was published in 1991, and a third novel in the trilogy, Tangled Up in Blue was published in 2000. Vinge also published a novella, World’s End (1984), set in the same universe.
  • (5/5)
    This is simply an outstanding story. It has all the familiar themes of science fiction, with spaceships and technology and clones, intertwined with the fate of a small number of poeple, and a very special world. The story and the people are complex and interesting and compelling, and it is very well written.
  • (4/5)
    This one won the Hugo Award in 1981 & with good reason. Someone in another review I read said that this book was what Dune would be if it had been written by a female anthropologist.I read this when it first came out - loved the doomed love story at its core with its echoes of the Hans Christian Anderson story. Reading it now I'm more drawn to the politics and culture of the world & to the notion of the sibyl mind - a huge networked database containing all of the knowledge of the Old Empire that is accessed by those who are infected with a virus, the network is watched over by mer. The whole back-and-forth of "Input" & "Transfer ended" sounds in my head like an old school modem connecting to the Internet. Love broadband, but sometimes I miss that noise.It's good to read science fiction with strong female characters of all kinds & with interesting stories and connections. This works.
  • (5/5)
    This book deals with a lot of real world issues from sexism to human rights to animal rights and that’s one of the things I really liked about it. The things that were happening were understandable because they happen in the real world. It’s interesting to see these issues out of real world context and in a sci-fi book. They give it weight.Things I liked about this book - the characters, the villainess in particular, were wonderful to read. Each character felt real to me, as though I actually knew these people, and that’s something I really love in a book.Things I did not like - Sparks. I do not like Sparks as a (fictional) person. As a character, he’s well-written, he makes sense, he’s realistic. I just don’t like him. I can’t elaborate much more than that without giving too much away so I’ll leave it there.If the cover blurb sounds interesting to you, I definitely say you should read this book. It’s an amazing read.
  • (5/5)
    I read this as a teen and didn't get it. When I was in my 20's I read it again and loved it. The contamination issues, the culture clash, all resonated more strongly when I was exposed to them in my own life.
  • (5/5)
    This novel reminded me of "Dune" in a lot of ways. It was a sweeping epic that spanned galaxies, with lots of main characters, but was centered on a small world with a very important commodity that extends life. And both commodities have unusual, biological sources. But, after that these two diverge greatly. Tiamet is ruled by the Snow Queen. She has ruled for nearly 150 years and will die when the wormhole to other worlds closes during "summer." Tiamet changes from a technological society to a rural one when the other worlders take their advances and go. It is then that the Summer Queen will reign. Only, the Snow Queen doesn't want to give up her throne, or the technology. One technology may hold her answer - cloning. This book has a lot of depth, great character development and an intricate plot. Highly recommended!
  • (2/5)
    the ewoks meet Gone with the Wind meet DuneThe book has some cool ideas, but unfortunately too much of the book gets in the way of developing these cool ideas. The characters tend to be rather one-dimensional, while the plot just seems to drag on way too long.
  • (4/5)
    This book was a delicious surprise! A friend recommended it long ago, so my husband bought our first copy used at the Book Nook in Atlanta. I finally read it, and what a treat. It really is Andersen's fairy tale, too -- in that there are two cousins who love ech oher, and one gets "bewitched" by the Snow Queen Arienrhod. That's simplifying the plot a bit, though.Here, Winter people equal technology and progress; Summer people equal faith, tradition and living off the land. Offworlders hold the progress the Winters desire, but they keep the planet Tiamat in the dark so they can exploit it. Sparks (our Kay) is half off worlder/half Summer, but tempted by the Snow Queen and his love for Winter's technology (Andersen's demon mirror speck?). Moon (our Gerda) is Summer, but also related to the Snow Queen in a mysterious way. She holds a totally different sort of power -- love. Combine that with the population of "mers" who hold the promise of immortality, and the promise of Summer power -- and an interesting & provocative tale is told.(read and reviewed in 1999)
  • (4/5)
    WARNING: This review contains mild spoilers.Overall an entertaining work, if a big overlong with tendencies to meander. Not too sure about the physics of this, but main premise of the story is a revolving black hole near a planet that can be used to maintain contact with six other planets, forming the "Hegemony." The backstory is a galaxy wide empire that collapsed, and they haven't been able to figure out FTL travel again, the Hegemony only has access to solar systems near enough to these revolving black holes. And the black hole is closing for a hundred or so years, during which time planet Tiamat will descend into barbarism. The "Snow Queen" will be put to death and a "Summer Queen" raised to power. The current Snow Queen [Arienrhod] clones herself [Moon Dawntreader Summer] who becomes a Sibyl, with all the knowledge of the old empire, but with only access to it in a garbled fashion. Quite a bit of filler, and the science fiction seems to incline more and more to fantasy, but ultimately good triumphs over evil, the black hole closes and we set the stage for a bunch of sequels.
  • (5/5)
    I've owned this book for a very long time, and actually started reading it twice, only to get distracted. This time I finished it, and I was not disappointed. It starts off kind of slow, but then Vinge gets all of her different plots going and the thing sort of gathers this incredible momentum. It's an SF novel about a world called Tiamat, which orbits two stars and a stable black hole. Due its idiosyncratic orbit, every 150 years Tiamat's atmosphere radically changes. During the cold years, the Winters rule, and during the warm, the Summers have control. The Winters are technologically minded, whereas the Summers consider technology to be heresy. So basically, every 150 years, the world devolves back to a sort of primitive state, and all offworld contact ceases. The Winter queen of Tiamat is hatching a plot to maintain power after the changeover, and it centers around a young Summer named Moon...The complexity of the plot and politics brings to mind _Dune_ by Frank Herbert, although in many ways I actually preferred _The Snow Queen_ over Dune. The whole novel is more women-centered, which is interesting and welcome, but what I really enjoyed was the strength of Vinge's characterization -- there are a LOT of secondary characters, and she manages to make every one of them interesting. Even when a character had a relatively small role in the plot, I was able to get a feel for their motivations and who they were as a person. I look forward to reading the sequels.
  • (5/5)
    The book is a fast-paced, adventure-laden story of the contrasting lives of two 19th century girls, one raised in the "civilized" portion of Scandinavia, the other the daughter of a shaman and a robber-baron of Lapland. Together they must confront the Ice Queen, sorceress of the icy Northern wastes. When Gerda leaves home to track down Kai, the boy she wishes would return her love and who has gone North with a mysterious countess to study arcane subjects, she little expects to become the captive of a robber baron of Northern Finland and his daughter's pet plaything. Ritva, the shaman's headstrong daughter comes to realize that Gerda is not just a human pet, fit only to amuse her. Together they seek the Snow Queen's castle in the Northern fastness. Gerda's rational and common sense approach, along with Ritva's innate fey nature and her reindeer, Ba, allow them to release Kai and escape. Ultimately though, Gerda can see that Kai will never truly be interested in her. As a book for young adults The Snow Queen is just fine, proceeding quickly but in an exciting and page-turning manner. However, the best of childrens' literature reads well for both youngsters and adults, though obviously on different levels. For an older reader The Snow Queen lacks somewhat in depth and, in several instances, I would have liked a particular scene or narrative to continue longer and in more detail. The narrative often skipped forward several weeks or months. This to a certain extent is probably due to the fairy tale source/style, a genre which frequently uses such leaps in time or space, but in The Snow Queen this often precluded anything but the sketchiest details of the society and landscapes around the two young women.
  • (5/5)
    This is very special book for me. The story is wonderful and the illustrations are full of living art and beauty.The art in this book is truly breathtaking, the details are amazing! I just agreed with many readers about it. For example: "This is perhaps the most extraordinary children's book that I have ever seen.' - Paulo Coelho, Internationally selebrated writer. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil" Or: "The full page illustrations by the award winning Ukrainian artist, Vladyslav Yerko, are alone worth the price of the book. I recommend it to all ages." Robert Goldsborough, Writer and former Chicago Tribune Magazine editor* I found special edition of The Snow Queen book on the site snowqueen.us
  • (3/5)
    The text was lovely in Engelbreit's version but I don't know if she adapted that or not. The illustrations were cute, but *not* at all appropriate, in my opinion. I had wanted to find the edition illustrated by Vladyslav Yerko or the one by Naomi Lewis. I will have to find another text, maybe an older one, to compare, as there's no note here.
  • (4/5)
    The story of a little girl, and a little boy, and how they were separated and brought back together. This is a quaint story told in fairy tale fashion. The reader, Julia Whelan does a fine job. There were a few bits I found tedious, but that may be my impatient spirit at the moment. Brutal in some parts, a reminder that people didn't used to hide the evil or bad parts of life from children. I liked the allusion to the fragments of mirror distorting one's view of the world and all things good in the world, but I really didn't get the ending with the song of baby Jesus and the roses. An enjoyable story though, and just over an hour long.
  • (5/5)
    The Snow Queen was one of the spring books to read for the group, Into the Forest. I remembered the basic story from when I was young, but decided to refresh my memory with a reread. I?m so glad I did.

    The version that I read was barely 29 pages long, even with lovely illustrations taking up some of the space. It somehow managed to be charming, surprising, whimsical, lyrical, and a bit suspenseful all at the same time. I read it very slowly, even a few pages a day, just to let the phrases and images tumble about in my brain.

    I loved the matter-of-fact way that Gerda conversed with rivers, birds, and reindeer in her search for her missing friend. They were all guileless and helpful, which was not always the case with the humans in the story. Most of the humans were ultimately helpful, but not always guileless. Even so, no one in the story was evil as such. Like the story of the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden, an external force thrown into the world brings about hard-heartedness and cruelty.

    The natural world was firmly part of the fabric of the story. In fact, a few references made me wonder if Hans Christian Andersen was making sly pokes at rationality from time to time, particularly rationality that made one dismiss the mystical wonders of flora and fauna. The clever princess, who reads all the newspapers and then forgets them as proof of her intelligence, is a case in point.

    I had put off starting this book until the snow from the last storm melted. I?m glad I did. As I went on a long walk this morning, I saw snowdrops and crocus in brave little bunches. I couldn?t help but smile at them and asked them quietly what their story was.
  • (4/5)
    The Snow Queen, illustrated by Angela Barrett.Originally published in 1845, The Snow Queen (Sneedronningen) has always been one of my favorites, of Hans Christian Andersen's many original fairy-tales. It also happens to be one of his longest, divided into seven chapters, or stories (Historier), from the opening piece about the devil's looking glass, and its many splinters, to the final selection detailing what happened to the Snow Queen's palace, and to Gerda and Kai, after they escape. A powerful tale, of a love that never gives up, and is never defeated - not by hardship, or time, or even reason - it has all the hallmarks of great storytelling: a brave and persistent hero(ine), a quest into a strange and wondrous world, and a wellspring of deep emotion.This lovely edition, translated by Naomi Lewis and illustrated by Angela Barrett, does justice to Andersen's marvelous tale, and although it is not quite the equal of Vladyslav Yerko's version (and really, what is?), it ranks high among the many adaptations I have read. The narrative is true to the original, divided into seven parts, and including many details - the stories told by the flowers in the witch's garden, for instance - that are omitted in other retellings. I appreciated Lewis's introduction, in which she notes the fact that all the female characters in this tale are strong, and often good - a rarity, both in Andersen, and in the wider fairy-tale world! Barrett, whose version of Snow White is my favorite retelling of that tale, delivers a gorgeous visual landscape, full of the depth and mystery I have come to expect in her work.In sum: a wonderful retelling of The Snow Queen, well worth the time of any reader who loves this fairy-tale, or appreciates beautiful picture-books!