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Moll Flanders
Moll Flanders
Moll Flanders
eBook314 Seiten4 Stunden

Moll Flanders

Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen

3/5

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Über dieses E-Book

Moll Flanders, im englischen Originaltitel (The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous) Moll Flanders ist ein von Daniel Defoe verfasster und 1722 erschienener Roman.

Er beschreibt in der Form einer Ich-Erzählung das Leben von Moll Flanders, einer fiktiven Figur, in der sich aber Teile von realen Persönlichkeiten (unter anderem der des Autors) wiederfinden.

(aus wikipedia.de)
SpracheDeutsch
HerausgeberBooks on Demand
Erscheinungsdatum15. Juni 2015
ISBN9783734777295
Moll Flanders
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Autor

Daniel Defoe

Born c. 1660, Daniel Defoe is acknowledged as being one of the founders of the English novel. Growing up in London and surviving the Great Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire in 1666, he went on to become a trader, journalist and spy. He also wrote more than 500 books, pamphlets and journals on topics as varied as politics, crime, religion, marriage and the supernatural.

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Bewertung: 3.0338827838827838 von 5 Sternen
3/5

1.092 Bewertungen42 Rezensionen

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  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I first read MOLL FLANDERS in 2001, in the midst of an “I’ll Read Classic Lit So's I Can Be Cultured And Stuff” phase. So far as I was concerned, classic novels were Good For You, but they weren’t necessarily enjoyable. I read them to give myself a sense of the wider literary tradition, not for entertainment.Imagine my surprise when I devoured MOLL FLANDERS in three sittings, one of which took me through nearly a hundred and fifty pages.The book is almost indecently fun. Moll schemes her way through the England of the 1600s, rising and falling at irregular intervals as her illegal undertakings bear fruit or go awry. She marries often, bears a multitude of children, turns to robbery whenever the need arises (or the opportunity presents itself), and deceives very nearly everyone she encounters. Her wild life must have seemed the height of debauchery to eighteenth century readers, many of whom I'm sure gloried in it anyway.I suppose it’s possible to read MOLL FLANDERS as the chronicle of a woman forced into an indecent life of which she repents most ardently, but I find that a terribly boring take on the situation. I much prefer to view Moll as someone who’s ever in charge of her own destiny. She’s born into fairly low circumstances which she contrives to improve upon by any means necessary. Whether she's talking her way into a rich man’s bed or persuading an elderly fence to help her become London’s most successful pickpocket, she’s always in charge. She caters her lies to each individual, playing on their peculiar vanities in such a way that they can’t help but give in to her whims. Poor luck may set her back a step or two, but she never lets it keep her down for long. As soon as one scheme grows stale, she turns her hand to another. No matter what life throws at her, she finds a way to turn it to her advantage and come out on top.The narrative conventions of the time dictate that she must deny receiving any satisfaction from her actions, but it’s obvious she enjoys herself immensely. The novel is full of moments where she vows to lead a somber and discreet life... right after she’s finished committing such-and-such a sin, and maybe one more for good measure. And hey, she’s never been involved in that line of illegal work, so she might as well give it a go before she throws in the towel. If it leads to another opportunity of a similar nature... well, so much the better.Oh, Moll. I frickin’ love you.Of course, I’m not an eighteenth century reader. It’s entirely possible that the original target audience would’ve been so scandalized by Moll’s doings that they took her cautions and lamentations at face value. Hell, maybe Defoe even intends them that way.Me, I remain unconvinced of her penitence. She's an adept liar, after all; it's difficult to believe she'd restrain herself from practicing this skill upon the reader. I like to hope she keeps on scheming after the novel’s end, albeit in a wealthier sphere than was previously possible and with a willing partner in her final (or maybe just latest?) husband.Godspeed to you, Moll, and good luck.(This review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina.)
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
     Moll Flanders is a strange book. It's a cautionary tale, but it also feels like a sermon on promiscuity and greed. The book follows the life of Moll Flanders from her infancy, being born to a criminal in prison, all the way through her life which also ends in crime. She grows into a beautiful woman and ends up marrying one man after another. Her horrible circumstances move her from one bad situation to another. One husband dies, another ditches her, and another turns out to be her half-brother! I enjoyed the first half much more than the second. The story’s moralistic tone echoes that in the author’s other famous work, Robinson Crusoe.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Moll Flanders led a scandalous life back when that was a bad thing. In this book she relates her life from her inauspicious birth in the Newgate prison, to her industrious rise in society as a young woman, and through her years as a thief and whore. Her words, not mine. OK, maybe mine, too.I found the first part of the book entertaining as Moll always seems to find herself associated with the wrong type of men. About halfway through the book she is forced into thievery and at that point I thought the book really slowed. There seemed to be a non-stop catalog of all the things she stole and how. The final part of the book, which Moll herself will be less interesting to the reader, was indeed less interesting, but Defoe does a nice job of tying up all the loose ends before the end. There are better classics, but I'm glad I read this one.Used Whispersync to both read and listen to this book via Audible. The technology worked better for me this time than last, but there were still a view glitches.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    I adore Moll. She's a fascinating, dynamic character: full of depth, verve, and joi de vivre. She's as flawed as characters come (an amoral whore that frequently uses people to suit her own ends, while placing all her love and trust (and fortune) in people who inevitably abandon her or let her down). And yet, she's completely aware of her flaws and acknowledges that they are flaws. The change and growth in Moll is progressive, logical, and exceedingly realistic.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    I was certainly not happy to hear Defoe insist at length, in the preface, that he'd taken all the dirty parts out.

    Defoe was many things as a writer, but "fun" isn't high up the list.

    Also, check out this sentence: "She asked him if he thought she was so at her last shift that she could or ought to bear such treatment, and if he did not see that she did not want those who thought it worth their while to come farther to her than he did, meaning the gentleman she had brought to visit her by way of sham." I actually can't figure out if that sentence means anything or not. Is she saying she doesn't want the dude who was willing to travel to hit on her? Why not? Sure, he's actually like her cousin or whatever, but the dude she's talking to isn't supposed to know that...

    Dude writes some over complicated sentences, is what I'm saying. I don't remember Crusoe being this convoluted.

    Ah! I've been trying to figure out how Defoe writes a book with no women in it, and then a book from a woman's point of view; the similarity is that they both work from desperate places. Places of necessity.

    I still need a while to process this book. Around halfway through I thought that not only did I not like it, but it made me like Robinson Crusoe less too. Now having finished it, I feel like it's a five-star book. I might bump it down to four. Defoe is sortof a humorless bastard, and he doesn't particularly get inside his characters' heads. But Moll Flanders, particularly, feels like a very subversive book to me. Moll insists on taking control of her life. Men certainly come off as insignificant at best.

    I didn't love the Signet Classic edition I read; it was sorta...little. I like my books to be weightier and more important looking. (And, incidentally, the used copy I ordered came with random passages underlined, which drives me nuts.) Did have a fairly good afterword, though. Although it threatened to spoil like six other 18-century books I'm about to read, so I had to skip whole paragraphs.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Better than John Bunyan's Grace abounding to the Chief of Sinners; more detailed a portrait than the Wife of Bath, who also, remember, had 5 wives (EDIT: by which of course I mean five HUSBANDS); hell, it's probably the best book of its kind. But how in god's name am I going to teach it?

    This edition interesting for its Virginia Woolf introduction, which is mainly about Robinson Crusoe, about which she has more interesting things to say than she does Moll Flanders. The Woolf is also a nice record of a particular kind of criticism that discovered the value of a work of art in its tranhistorical truths about Human Nature. I can see easily how this same period--Woolf's that is--produced The Waste Land and Finnegans Wake, all of which also make the same profoundly ahistorical, profoundly appropriative, profoundly unethical mistake.
  • Bewertung: 2 von 5 Sternen
    2/5
    Story has sad, but honest beginning which moves into Moll's willing seduction by the elder son of her kind and generous patrons. Character has little to recommend and plot quickly becomes repetitive, tedious, and too boring to continue...
  • Bewertung: 2 von 5 Sternen
    2/5
    “If a young women once thinks herself handsome, she never doubts the truth of any man that tells her he is in love with her; for if she believes herself charming charming enough to captive him, 'tis natural to expect the effects of it.”The full title of this classic novel is 'The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders' and this in many respects an apt summary of this book. It tells the life story of the titular character.Moll Flanders was born in Newgate Prison, London, the daughter of a convicted felon who is subsequently transported to America shortly after Moll's birth. Moll is initially brought up by the state and later taken by benefactors. She grows up to be a beautiful woman determined to be someone other than a servant. This she attempts to do by marrying a variety of wealthy man, one of whom she later learns to her horror after bearing him several children, is actually her half-brother. As various marriages fail for various reasons, her fear of poverty leads her to commit many forms of theft. This way of life she later finds impossible to give up so that even when she became relatively wealthy, she continued stealing.Through a variety of guises and some quick thinking Moll manages to evade prison for many years, unlike a number of her accomplices who are caught then hung or transported to the colonies, until she became the richest thief in London. Perhaps inevitably, she was finally arrested and taken to Newgate Prison whereupon she is sentenced to transportation to the American colonies. In prison Moll chances upon her most recent living husband, himself a highwayman awaiting sentencing. Whereupon both are transported to Virginia before moving on to Maryland where they become successful plantation owners in their own right.At the age of almost seventy, Moll returned to London with her husband, where they planned to live out their lives in repentance for their past crimes.There are several themes that run through this book but perhaps the most prominent one is Greed. The author seems to take great efforts to paint Moll as covetous. Moll sees people in particular her husbands as commodities — they appear little more than business transactions. Then when here first husband dies she seems happy to abandon her children to the care of their paternal grandparents. Then later in life even when she becomes relatively wealthy as a thief she is unable to forsake her criminal ways despite the main initial driving force, notably poverty, no longer applies. She continually raises the financial target where she states she will go on the straight and narrow. After her arrest repentance then becomes a major theme but even here Defoe seems to aim to paint Moll in a poor light. She repents about not giving up her criminal ways earlier rather than than the actual crimes themselves. She never seems to feel sorry for the people that she wronged.Now initially I must admit that I found the early years of Moll's life rather tedious and I was tempted on more than one occasion to throw in the towel. However, I persevered and as she re-counted her criminal career I found it much more entertaining. On the whole I found this a little laborious but ultimately am pleased that I managed to finish it but may leave it a while before I challenge another classic.
  • Bewertung: 2 von 5 Sternen
    2/5
    With the novel's title you know what's going to happen: The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders who was Twelve Year a Whore, five times a Wife (whereof once to her own Brother), Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon in Virginia, at last grew Rich, liv'd Honest, and died a Penitent. Written from her own Memorandums.Sounds all very exciting, but to me it was a tedious account by a very annoying person. I didn't like her at all, and it goes on forever describing various husbands, lovers and money-worries - the latter is preeminent - the children she have we hear little or nothing about - as if they were just some play dolls. From a historic point of view of course it's interesting to read as a precursor to the modern novel.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    kinda ridiculous, but also kinda funny. It's interesting to see Defoe's stance on religion basically undermine the entire story at the end. or does it?
  • Bewertung: 2 von 5 Sternen
    2/5
    Moll Flanders (by Daniel Defoe) was the first book I've had to read for class now I'm at university. This is for my "introduction to the novel" module, and it's considered to be one of the earliest English novels, and is part of the canon as my university sees it. In my opinion, it's not quite there -- Defoe "marketed" it as a true story, and in terms of style or plotting like a novel, there's little. It's just the straight, stream-of-consciousness tale of a woman in the seventeenth century who has loose morals. There are no chapters, the story is entirely linear, and it doesn't follow the same conventions as what we'd now consider a novel.

    Which is not to say I don't see where it comes into the canon: it's clearly fictional, and reminds me quite a lot of books like Go Ask Alice, only for the seventeenth century! It's interesting to observe how different things were then: the weird punctuation, random capitalisation and italicisation, the lack of chapter breaks, the lack of speech marks. Very strange to think how much the novel has evolved.

    In terms of plot, it's not as shocking as I was expecting it to be given the blurb: "Moll Flanders follows the life of its eponymous heroine through its many vicissitudes which include her early seduction, careers in crime and prostitution, conviction for theft and transportation to the plantations of Virginia", etc. There's not honestly much prostitution, although she has lots of husbands, and the sex stuff is all skipped over quickly. One of the stories within the story is quite weird: the story of how she marries her brother. The theft part doesn't show up until later on, although that isn't half-hearted and a lot of her clever heists are described.

    As a character, Moll gets quite a lot of depth; but at the same time, you expect that from a novel of this length that is written entirely in her head! I didn't really feel any emotional connection to her, though, and she didn't feel 'real' to me, really. I found the whole book quite boring and difficult to read. Worth a look, though, if you're interested in early novels. I could probably do a better, fuller review of this after my lecture next week -- heck, I might come back and edit some more interesting stuff in. Right now, though, I need to go off and make notes on the portrayal of women in it, before I forget!
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    A masterpiece, I thoroughly enjoyed Defoe's, Moll Flander's. It would be interesting to do a comparative study of the various heroines in classic fiction; Nana, Lady Chatterley, Madame Bovary, and Anna Karenina, to name a few. I look forward to reading Samuel Richardson's Clarissa/The History of a Young Life (which is an 18th century creation, like Moll Flanders’) this summer to add to my increasing repertoire of fascinating female heroines.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I continued my current re-reading of the classics with this one, first read 40 years ago, and I was pleased to have my fond memories of it refreshed. One of the earliest British novels, this masquerades as a memoir, with Defoe handling the female perspective of the eponymous heroine just as well as he did Robinson Crusoe. I call her 'heroine' though Moll's adventures as sometime prostitute and recidivist thief would seem to disqualify her from such a status but for her late redemption and reform. In any case, we never think of her as a real villain, rather one who is forced by circumstances to make her way in life the best she can. She does admit to being an easy prey to temptation, and she is her own best apologist. As Moll says herself, her 'wicked' life is a lot more interesting to read than her return to virtue and prosperity. We learn a good deal along the way about the harsh conditions of living in late 17th Century England, and of the brutal treatment wrong-doers might expect, both from the courts and, if they catch you, from the mob. Humour and romance help to alleviate the gloom which, along with Moll's winning narrative, always keep us on her side even while she commits her more outrageous sins.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    I've been trying to read early English 'novels' (and related things), and this is a distant fourth so far, behind Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver's Travels and Joseph Andrews. On the upside, there are some memorable scenes and characters. But it doesn't really cohere too well, and there's a little hint of paid-per-word about the whole criminal activities section. Supposedly most people are really into Moll's thieving, but frankly I found her whoring and intra-familial reproduction much more gripping.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Two things stood out for me:
    It's a first-hand look at the underside of early 18th-century life in England and the American colonies, particularly the economic constraints on women.
    Defoe was a skillful writer: compare Robinson Crusoe, Journal of the Plague Year, and Moll Flanders. Each differs from the others in the handling of how Defoe presents himself as the author, how he creates a supposed narrator, and how the characters speak (or not) about themselves.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    It's delightful when a book you have been hearing about your whole life lives up to expectation. Dear Moll, or whatever your real name was, what a pleasure it was to sit by your side. What is remarkable is that a book told to us entirely in summary could be so rich and deep and satisfying. Moll has the mic, everything we learn is filtered through her unreliable filter and yet because she is so utterly human you are charmed. I loved how Moll would advise us that she couldn't possibly tell someone something just before she does. Apparently the lives of criminals in her day and age were very popular and that Defoe was working in a popular genre, maybe even basing Moll on an actual woman. The tragedy of the book occurs when Moll announces that she hopes to be a gentlewoman and is laughed at. What she means is independent, self sufficient, what they mean is aristocratic. But however much Defoe based it on a person his hand is there. Whenever something good happens to Moll, like she married an upright decent guy, he's killed off quickly. Most frightening at least from the sociological standpoint is Moll's relationship to her many children. With one exception - the child born of incest in Virginia - there is none. They don't even receive names. So we are very much looking at the world during a period in which one didn't become too attached because of the frequency with which they died.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Moll Flanders by Daniel DefoeConsidered one of the great classic novels, Defoe's book follows Moll Flanders as she struggles to avoid the deadly poverty of 17th-century England. From a prison birth to final prosperity Moll considers love, theft and prostitution in terms of profit and loss. She emerges as an extraordinary character.This is the vivid saga of an irresistible and notorious heroine. Her high misdemeanors and delinquencies, her varied careers as a prostitute, a charming and faithful wife, a thief, and a convict endures today as one of the liveliest and most candid records of a woman's progress through the hypercritical walks of society ever recorded.Moll isn't the most proper of women. She isn't the cleanest. She isn't the most trust worthy. She isn't a lot of things. But what Moll Flanders is; is an exceptional character of literature. I loved Moll! I can't wait to give this one a reread.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Moll Flanders was a surprisingly good read considering it was written in the 17th century and thought to be one of the first novels ever written. It wouldn't make my favorites list, but the story definitely never got boring. All of Moll's story is pretty much summed up in the paragraph-long title. She gets married five times (once to her brother! Unknowingly, of course), becomes an infamous criminal, and then settles down for a quiet life in rural Carolina where she inherits a fortune from her mother. I admit, the fact that my copy had no chapter breaks whatsoever, had every noun capitalized, and had no quotation marks for the dialogue made this book a little tedious to read at times, but otherwise it was an entertaining story. If Moll Flanders was ever rewritten as a contemporary novel, I believe that it could be a favorite.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I am sometimes afraid that we will have nothing to say to each other at our reader discussion groups. Hah! We talked for over an hour and a half about this picaresque classic. How much was to be considered 'true', considering that it was supposedly a memoir of a repentant woman? How could she say so little about her children? Did she exploit her sexuality or just make the best of the society? She confessed to liking the thrill of theft even after she no longer needed more money, trimmed her stories to her circumstances and her audience, barely mentioned the hardships of crossing the Atlantic (I wonder if Defoe ever did?), learned to make and manage money, and in general navigated a society that was not kind to women without status and means. Was Defoe as tuned in to the hardships of women as this book suggests? Or was he more interested in writing a sly, picaresque adventure with the allure of a female protagonist? Did we believe the 'woman's voice'?Defoe shows us the society of the time, the narrow path between servant and master class in the late 17th century in an urbanizing country as well as a new world. The book is filled with incident - in fact, when Moll has achieved, however temporarily, a quiet life, we hear nothing about it except how it ends. Moll ('not my real name') tells us at the beginning that she ends up in London, secure, married, content, mature, repentant of her sinful life. So the traditional suspense is absent - it was all about how it happened. But it was fun to read, watching her journey and learning about the times.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    This book seemed a lot longer than it actually was. It's not exactly boring - a lot happens. However, Defoe tends to simply list events so it's a little like reading someone's flat and colorless diary. The novel follows Moll Flanders as she moves from poor orphan to wife, mistress, thief, convict and penitent. She's involved in multiple melodramas but generally extracts herself and is on to the next adventure. Moll marries several times, but a lot of her husbands don't even rate a name. In one case, she appears to care about one of her children, then forgets it a few pages later and it is never mentioned again. When Defoe does choose to focus on a subject, however, the book is quite interesting.He spends a lot of time describing Moll's initial fall from grace, why women should be choosy in picking a partner and Moll's exploits as a thief. Throughout all of Moll's adventures, her main goal is simply to make a living. While married, she was generally a good wife but her husbands keep dying or going on the run. Desperation drives her to steal or become someone's mistress. Wouldn't say it wasn't worth reading, but you have to pick through a lot of all-plot-no-development to get to the good parts.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    What if there were a drunken Chatty Cathy sitting next to you at a dinner party and wanted to tell you her life story? That's what Moll Flanders reads like. In the end, it became the same thing over and over again. I would have liked it a lot more if it had been about half as long.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    like having a conversation with someone who never lets you get a word in
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Moll Flanders describes how she fell into whoring (her words) and thievery. Basically it's a long rambling tale of her life as she moves from one husband to the next, sometimes marrying one husband while still "technically" married to the last, and leaving a litany of children in her wake (whom she seems to have little interest in at all, despite assurances otherwise).The point of the story is that this is supposed to be a tale of the misfortunate, as tales about thieves, murders, and other miscreants were very popular at the time period. It had enough to it that I was able to keep trudging through it, as she fell into one misfortune after another (kind of like watching a train wreck). But I have to admit that I was severely disappointed in the book, because I so loved the movie. True, the movie had been Hollywood-zed big time, but in my opinion this is one of the very rare cases where this was a good thing. Moll was more naive in the movie, not so much trying to con her way through live but falling into the necessity so as to survive, which is part of what appealed to me. The book's Moll lacked that innocence, and was openly deceptive and conned many men (from fear of poverty, true), and there was very little to redeem her. Tar and feather me, if you like, but in my opinion the movie was more enjoyable than the book.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    What can I say about Moll Flanders? This book really makes you look at the life of women in the past. Moll does a lot of things that will make you go what!? I enjoyed it because it is a book that can be analyzed and interpreted in so many ways. Moll becomes a survivor in a world that she was made to fail in.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    "Moll Flanders" is the tale of an innovative woman who will stoop to the lowest of trades in order to be a "lady." Married five times, Moll is at varying times a thief, a whore, a convict, and a prisoner. This book was interesting, though not exactly a page turner. Defoe, as is to be expected, is quite fond of rambling on about every little detail, which is accentuated due to a lack of chapters or page breaks.Few characters are given a name, which can also make the book a bit confusing. Even Moll never reveals her true name, always insisting to the reader that Moll Flanders is just a nick name she is given later in life. I got more than a few of Moll's many husbands confused at different points, because they were all "him." Eventually everyone just became "that guy" in my mind.I liked the character of Moll, because she was different, and certainly unique for a book written in Defoe's time. She seems shameless and unscrupulous from the very beginning, which she seems to justify in her mind as a way of survival.When her friends and comrades in crime are hung, Moll voices no sorrow over their deaths, only fear that she may soon share the same fate.There is no doubt that Moll is not exactly a blameless character. She uses her beauty to snare potentially rich husbands, and she mentions a few times having children and then they are never mentioned again. In fact, I remember her saying that she had "gotten rid of" her children, or some similar phrasing, by giving them to a friend or family member. She has a few very low moments, such as when she steals a piece of jewelry from a young child, or when she steals a family's things while their house is burning down. However, there is something likable to Moll, and I would never classify her as one of those hero-villain types. Perhaps it is how clever and innovative she is, just trying her best to make her way in the world the best that she knows how.Her schemes becoming increasingly creative as the book progresses, and I loved when she began her disguises - a man, a lady, a begger, a widow, a foreigner. Though Moll is always calling herself "wicked" or "sinful," she seems unwilling to fully acknowledge it. Such as, just after she has stolen something, she says: "I confess the inhumanity of this action moved me very much, and made me relent exceedingly, and tears stood in my eyes..., but I could never find in my heart to make any restitution."When Moll is at least caught in her schemes and locked in Newgate Prison, I felt that I knew her for the first time in the story. Defoe's writing style doesn't exactly allow you to become all that close to Moll through out the story, but we feel that we have seen her entire life leading up to this point when at last she is thrown into the jail.She seems to fear Newgate more than anything, perhaps because it forces her to think of herself as not a great lady, like she always strove to be - but a common criminal. I loved how even after thrown in jail and sentenced to death, Moll never ceased her scheming, and rather than sink into despair over the verdict, she immediately begins planning a way out of it.*Mild spoilers in the next paragraph*The ending surprised me a little, as I had honestly expected Moll to meet as unfortunate an end as the rest of her life reflected. But the ending was, instead, a happy one, and I closed the book smiling."Moll Flanders" is a good character study about a very interesting, notorious woman.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    I did not love this book but I was fascinated by it. Defoe paints a clear picture of what life was like for a female without means in the17th century. Written as autobiography, the narrator never reveals her true name, taking several names and becoming known as Moll Flanders. She is born of a convicted criminal in Newgate Prison, who was spared execution because of her pregnancy. Mother's sentence is commuted and she is "transported" to America, while her baby is sent to be raised by a foster mother. She tells her foster mother that she wishes to be a gentlewoman, having no idea what the term actually means. She believes that a gentlewoman is one who has the means and abilities to care for herself without being attached to anyone as a servant. (she calls a seamstress by that term becuase she is able to earn her own keep and have her own place) Our narrator is eventually sent to live with a family as their servant. She becomes a target for the affections of the two sons in the home. The first cajoles her into believing that he will marry her and coaxes her into an affair. The second tells her that he is in love with her and does not care that she is of low station. She does what is necessary to survive. She marries the younger son, at the request of the elder. He gets drunk and passes out on their wedding night and never knows that his bride was not pure. He does not live long and she is thrust into a world that values only those of means. She faces many obstacles and more than one moral dilemma. And she survives... using any and all means she possesses. Although I did not particularly like Moll, I am struck by her tenacious will to live. I am glad that I read it.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    I'm not sure what i can say about this classic book that hasn't already been said. It is the fictional story of Moll Flanders, a pseudonym because of the scandalous life she'd led. She is a 17th century woman who was born in Newgate prison where her mother was incarcerated. Raised in orphanages, she made a life for herself as best she could by latching on to various families and men, marrying several times, not always legally. With one of her husbands, she sailed to Virginia where she had two children and then discovered that her mother-in-law was in fact her mother and her husband was her brother. Later in her life she became a notorious thief, escaping capture many times aside from once. The style of writing is of course 17th century so does not flow as easily as modern fiction and i found the second part of the book where she became a thief more interesting than the first. There was apparently a movie made of it but for the most part is bears little resemblence to the book. It could be a good romp if made into a short series.
  • Bewertung: 1 von 5 Sternen
    1/5
    Loved this on PBS, but couldn't stand reading it. Quit before 100 pages
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Audiobook on CD. Book written detailing the adventures of Moll Flanders who lives by her wits and her body. Her fortune is made several times by herself, but is lost again, mostly due to her poor choice in men (drunks, womanisers, already married etc). Narrative is bawdy, jolly etc. It is both a serious (about a world where a woman can rarely survive on her own and with few rights to even her own money) and not-serious tale (she goes through husbands with almost every chapter). As a result of these dalliances, she has plenty of children, of which little is heard off once they are packed off somewhere else, to ensure that Moll isn’t hindered by a flock of children following her. I dont know if a woman would really do this, or whether this is Defoe's "wishful thinking" of fertile women not actually having children in tow. Overall an enjoyable lighthearted 18th century romp
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Great novel about how rough it was to be a woman alone in the world. Moll is pious when she can afford to be, lawless and wicked when she can't. A great book if you enjoy dramatic irony, and I do.

Buchvorschau

Moll Flanders - Daniel Defoe

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Moll Flanders

Des Autors Vorrede

Inhalt

Des Autors Nachschrift zur vierten Auflage

Impressum

Moll Flanders

Des Autors Vorrede

Die Welt ist in unsern Tagen überschwemmt mit Romanen und spannenden Begebenheiten, dass es schwer sein wird, für die Geschichte einer aus dem Volke Aufmerksamkeit zu erlangen, zumal noch Name und andere Umstände dieser Person verschwiegen werden, so dass ich nichts anderes tun kann, als dem Leser seine Meinung zu belassen über den Bericht auf den nachfolgenden Blättern, er mag ihn halten für was er mag.

Der Autor wird hier eingeführt, als ob er ihre Geschichte aufzeichne, und gibt in den ersten Zeilen die Gründe an, warum er es für passend erachtet ihren Namen zu verschweigen, in der Folge wird es kaum nötig sein, über diesen Punkt noch ein Wort zu verlieren.

Der Wahrheit die Ehre zu geben habe ich den ursprünglichen Bericht der verrufenen Frau, welche ihn hier erzählt, neu gefasst und den Ausdruck an einigen Stellen verändert, insbesondere ist es meine Mühe gewesen, dass sie ihre Geschichte nunmehr in geziemenderen Worten erzählt, als sie es in ihrer eigenen Niederschrift getan, wo ihre Sprache viel mehr die Zuchthäuslerin verrät denn die reuige und zurückhaltende Ehrbare, die sie später nach ihrem Bericht geworden ist. Die Feder, welche diese Geschichte zu Ende gebracht und sie so gestaltet hat, wie sie jetzt zu lesen ist, hat nicht wenig Fleiß verwendet ihr das Kleid zu geben, in welchem sie nunmehr zu sehen ist, denn wenn ein von Jugend auf verdorbenes Weib, ja die Frucht von Laster und Verderbtheit, dazu schreitet, einen Bericht ihres lasterhaften Lebens zu geben, das sie geführt hat, und auf die besonderen Gelegenheiten und Umstände eingeht, durch welche sie auf Abwege und in einen völligen Abgrund geriet, so muss der Verfasser aufs angelegentlichste Bedacht nehmen, dass er die Gewandung so rein wählt, dass kein Schaden gestiftet werde, insbesondere damit das Laster nicht für seine Zwecke daraus Vorteil ziehe.

Alle erdenkliche Sorgfalt ist auch getragen worden, dass eine angesteckte Einbildungskraft nicht neue Nahrung bekomme, dass in die jetzige Aufmachung der Erzählung sich nicht Schlüpfrigkeiten einschleichen und keine allzu gemeinen Ausdrücke aus ihrer schlechten Umgebung. Zu diesem Ende ist ein gewisser Abschnitt ihres Luderlebens, der die Zartheit verletzte, ausgelassen und verschiedene andere Teile um ein Merkliches verkürzt worden. Von dem, was übrig geblieben, wird erhofft, dass es den keuschen Leser oder die züchtige Zuhörerin nicht verletze. Aber da auch die ärgste Erzählung den besten Nutzen zu stiften vermag, so erwartet der Verfasser mit Zuversicht von dem Leser, dass die Moral ihn in dem nötigen Ernst erhalte auch da, wo die Erzählung sich ihm nach einer bedenklichen Seite zu neigen scheint.

Wenn die Geschichte eines verabscheuenswerten Lebens erzählt werden soll, so muss sie mit Notwendigkeit verabscheuenswerte Begebenheiten enthalten, wie sie eben jenes wirkliche Leben enthielt, um dem späteren Abschnitt jenen Hintergrund zu geben, auf dem die Schönheit der Reue am besten und leuchtendsten erstrahlen kann, wie überhaupt in einer Wiedergabe immer derselbe Wind wehen muss wie in der Wirklichkeit.

Es wird gesagt, dass in der Erzählung eines reuigen Lebens nicht dieselbe Lebendigkeit, dieselbe Farbigkeit und dieselbe Anziehungskraft herrschen kann wie in einem Bericht von Schandtaten. Wenn diese Annahme einigen Grund haben soll, so muss mir auch verstattet sein zu sagen, dass es nicht einerlei Geschmack und Neigung beim Lesen gibt und es nur allzu wahr ist, dass die Verschiedenheit nicht in der Beurteilung des wirklichen Wertes des Gegenstandes liegt als vielmehr am Gaumen und Gelüste des Lesers.

Allein da dieses Werk vor allem in die Hände derjenigen kommen soll, welche zu lesen und den besten Gebrauch aus dem zu machen verstehen, was diese Erzählung ihnen in die Hände gibt, so ist zu erhoffen, dass solche Leser mehr befriedigt sein werden von der Moral als von der Fabel, mehr von der Nutzanwendung als von der Darstellung, mehr von dem Endzweck, den der Autor im Sinne hatte, als von dem Leben der Person, das hier erzählt wird.

Es sind in dieser Geschichte ergötzliche Vorfälle in großer Zahl, von denen sich in jedem Falle ein Nutzen ziehen lässt, und da sie in angenehmer und wohlgestalteter Form dem Leser vorgeführt werden, so mag er auf die eine o