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Der Graf von Monte Christo
Der Graf von Monte Christo
Der Graf von Monte Christo
eBook356 Seiten4 Stunden

Der Graf von Monte Christo

Bewertung: 4.5 von 5 Sternen

4.5/5

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Über dieses E-Book

"Der Graf von Monte Christo" (orig. "Le Comte de Monte-Cristo") ist ein Abenteuerroman von Alexandre Dumas.

Zwischen 1844 und 1846 veröffentlichte Dumas den "Graf von Monte Christo" als Fortsetzungsroman in der Zeitschrift "Le Journal des débats" und erzielte damit ungeahnten Erfolg. Noch bevor der Roman fertiggestellt war, erschienen bereits die ersten Nachdrucke.

Die Geschichte spielt in der Zeit nach der Französischen Revolution in den Jahren 1814 bis 1838. Napoleons Stern ist untergegangen, und die Restauration unter den Königen Ludwig XVIII. und Karl X. hat stattgefunden. Dann folgt die Julirevolution von 1830, durch die der "Bürgerkönig" Louis-Philippe I. auf den Thron kommt.
SpracheDeutsch
HerausgeberBooks on Demand
Erscheinungsdatum24. Aug. 2015
ISBN9783738637465
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Autor

Alexandre Dumas

Fils du célèbre écrivain Alexandre Dumas, il a abandonné ses études après un échec au baccalauréat pour devenir un écrivain et un dandy très remarqué dans le Paris du 19e siècle. Son premier roman, La Dame aux Camélias, obtient rapidement un grand succès à sa parution en 1848 et charme les lecteurs par son histoire amour fiévreuse. Il a eu une relation compliquée avec son père, laquelle une partie de son oeuvre mettant en scène des relations familiales complexes, notamment ses pièces de théâtre Le fils naturel et Un père prodigue. Il est reconnu pour son engagement pour l'émancipation des femmes.

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Rezensionen für Der Graf von Monte Christo

Bewertung: 4.375 von 5 Sternen
4.5/5

176 Bewertungen173 Rezensionen

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  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I so was not expecting this book to so... fun. It is a near perfect book for what it is - drama, love, action, revenge, kindness, absurdity. You should totally read this book.Don't be afraid of the label of classic! Or that it is about a man in prison who escapes and gets revenge on those who put him there. Its not a dark story at all. It reminds me an Errol Flynn movie - where everybody is exactly what they seem, the good guys win, the bad guys get punished, and everybody lives the life they deserve at the end.But, the book isn't perfect - there is some aspects that are quite a stretch to believe. For example, Dante become an educated man by talking to a priest in the next cell over. Or how a ship was completely recreated, cargo and all. Or how the Count has a seemingly unending supply of money. There are a few ethical issues that will cause modern audiences some trepidation. The Count has a few slaves, even though slavery is illegal in France. Or his treatment of Mercedes - was she really suppose to wait for him for all the years he was gone?
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    A flawed yet still worthwhile masterpiece that shows the prowess of Dumas in creating a character that seems, and feels, real.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Finally finished this, really good read much better than the three musketeers.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    The Count of Monte Cristo is a classic story of betrayal and revenge. Edmond Dantes has it all: a father he loves, a pending promotion, and a beautiful fiance. Unfortunately, others envy him his good fortune and conspire to have him sent to prison for a crime he didn’t commit. When a fellow prisoner informs him of a treasure located on the Isle of Monte Cristo, he determines to escape and use that treasure to enact his revenge.

    From the great introduction to this book, I learned that Dumas wrote this to be published in sections in newspapers and was paid by the line. Reading The Count of Monte Cristo with it’s convoluted plot and inclusion of mundane conversations, that incentive is clear. However unnecessarily complicated the count’s revenge may be, it was still a lot of fun to read about. While some sections dragged a little, there was always some part of the plot which made me want to read quickly because I couldn’t wait to find out what happened next. The events could be cliched at times, but I enjoy cliches and to be fair to the author, he may be the originator of some of these now-cliched plot devices.

    One small problem I had with this book was the dislikable nature of our protagonist. As time goes by he gets more and more arrogant, convinced that his revenge is the hand of God! Fortunately for us, a pair of young lovers shows up for us to root for instead, so I never found myself without a character to relate to. Overall, this was far from the best classic I’ve read. It gave little insight into human nature and wasn’t especially well written. Fortunately, these flaws didn’t stop if from being an amusing swashbuckling adventure which was a lot of fun to read. Given it’s success as a light adventure story, I might recommend searching for a well done abridged versions. While the idea of missing parts of a story makes me nervous, I don’t think anyone is going to want to pick up a 1000 page book for light entertainment.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    when I was younger I recall liking it. I wouldn't say 'loved' it. I did love 'The Three Muskateers'. this story was a little outlandish for me. OMG my roomate's last-night's-stand just woke up in his room. she makes good sex sounds. ive never seen her face. just heard her get off. strange.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    This book is one of my all-time favorites, and a classic story
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    The Count of Monte Cristo has been one of my favorite novels since my early teens. While it is a romance novel, the qualities that appealed to me upon first reading, and to this day, are its historical detail set as it is in the midst of the Napoleonic era and the portrayal of justice and injustice. Above all it is a tale of revenge and retribution that leads from historical detail to a world of magic, fabulous treasure buried on a deserted island, of bandits and dark intrigue, and of wizardry and splendors borrowed from the Arabian nights. I have been enamored of superheroes and the fearless Monte Cristo was one of the first I encountered as he overcomes all the odds. A master of disguise, he has the secret of all knowledge, immense physical strength, endless resourcefulness, and complete power to punish the wicked. There are few heroes outside of comic books that rival The Count of Monte Cristo. Writers as disparate as Swinburne and Thackeray were both enthralled reading the exploits of Dumas' famous count. Above all Dumas was a great story teller and this is perhaps the main reason that he was popular throughout Europe in his day and his stories continue to appeal to readers and moviegoers (the recent, 2002, film version with Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes is splendid and captures the essence of the revenge story).In addition to the above-listed qualities The Count of Monte Cristo is not just an exciting tale of adventure and revenge, not only an historical fiction. Edmond Dantes has been wrongfully accused, convicted, and imprisoned in the Chateau D'if, an infamous island prison. His story is a psychological portrayal of obsession of the highest order and at the same time a paean to the value of education. The last item is the one I remember the most from my many readings of this magnificent tale of precipitous decline, betrayal and ultimate rise with vengeance at hand. It is the "plan of education" that Edmond Dantes completes under the tutelage of the elderly Abbe while imprisoned in the Chateau d'If that impresses me more than any other aspect of this tale. The Abbe tells him that "to learn is not to know; there are the learners and the learned. Memory makes the one, philosophy the other." Dantes enters upon a regimen of learning and swiftly begins to learn principles of mathematics and to understand several different languages. That he does use this knowledge in a way that belies the notion that he was gaining true wisdom seems to be the case, but the reader must traverse many hundreds of pages of exciting adventure before he can judge one way or the other. Whatever Dantes' eventual fate, the story that provides the exhilarating ride for the reader makes this a great book to read, and if your mind is like mine, to reread.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    How I expected to hate this, believing it to be long and boring and probably packed with tedious description. But I was totally wrong - it was easy to read (probably thanks to the modern translation), got down to business straight away, and within a few pages I couldn't put it down.There are many things wrong with the book - the characters for example, whose personalities change to an unrealistic degree just to suit the storyline, and a traditional reliance on coincidence, but what the heck, this is such a brilliant adventure story that none of it matters a bit. I absolutely loved it, it's my favourite 'classic' of all time.