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Des Nachts gehn wir im Kreis
Des Nachts gehn wir im Kreis
Des Nachts gehn wir im Kreis
eBook407 Seiten5 Stunden

Des Nachts gehn wir im Kreis

Bewertung: 3.5 von 5 Sternen

3.5/5

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Es läuft nicht gerade rund für Nelson. Sein Bruder hat die lateinamerikanische Heimat in Richtung USA verlassen, und seine Freundin trifft einen anderen, wird schwanger. Für den jungen Schauspieler ist es deshalb ein Lichtblick, als er vom legendären Theatermacher Henry Núñez für eine Rolle besetzt wird. Zusammen gehen sie auf Tournee und spielen in den Städten der Provinz, auf Marktplätzen und vor Bergleuten, ein Stück über Leben und Tod. Doch bei einem dieser Gastspiele kommt es zum Eklat: Nelson gibt seine Rolle im Stück auf und nimmt im echten Leben eine falsche Identität an, die ihn als tragischen Helden in die Irre führen wird. Mit diesem Roman hat sich Alarcón endgültig in die erste Reihe der bedeutendsten US- amerikanischen Autoren geschrieben. Vorsätzlich werden hier die Grenzen zwischen Kunst und Leben verwischt - wie schon in seinem großartigen, in zahlreiche Sprachen übersetzten Debütroman Lost City Radio gilt auch hier: Liebe ist immer politisch.
SpracheDeutsch
Erscheinungsdatum22. Aug. 2014
ISBN9783803141613
Des Nachts gehn wir im Kreis
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Rezensionen für Des Nachts gehn wir im Kreis

Bewertung: 3.5 von 5 Sternen
3.5/5

10 Bewertungen20 Rezensionen

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  • Bewertung: 1 von 5 Sternen
    1/5
    Slow, kept waiting for it, never happened, wasted my time, stupid ending
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Already looking forward to his next novel - the book fulfills the 'prodigious talent' blurbs on the back. At its simplest, for anybody who's ever been involved in putting on a play, the first two-thirds will be one of the best books about 'community theatre' you'll ever read. At its most complex, it spans politics, post-revolutionary culture, coming-of-age, travelogue, violence, and more. Why 3-and-a-half stars? Just didn't feel as if the energy carried all the way through to the end - given how much I enjoyed the first part, a really difficult task, but it sometimes felt like some easy-way-out choices were being made after the 'return to the city' from the travelling play. That said, I assume someone this good will only get better - I'll jump on the next book when it comes out.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    This book, as several other readers have mentioned, is difficult to assess. Nelson is eminently likeable, and the plot during the first half of the book is compelling, but it begins to drag after a while. The book is, in some ways, two books. The first half of the book and the second half are radically different in tone. I think this occurs mainly because the reader's expectations of Nelson dissipate somewhere during the middle part of the book. I give this book three and a half stars.I very much wanted to like this novel more.
  • Bewertung: 1 von 5 Sternen
    1/5
    Could not take the boredom any longer.Too much pointless pontificating and no plot development. Disjointed narration from whoever is framing the story. Just didn't care. Returned to audible.com. Only the second book I've ever returned.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    At Night We Walk in CirclesBy Daniel AlarconPerhaps a bit of historical perspective would be in order. For nearly three decades (1960's, 1970's, and 1980's) guerilla warfare was rampant in Latin America. The strategies for these movements were to destabilize governments and provoke a counter- reaction by the military. In general that strategy was successful; however in the process numerous atrocities were committed on both sides.In the midst of this conflict, in Daniel Alarcon's fictional South American nation, a theatrical company, called Dicembre was formed. It was theater for the people and "a time when theater was improvised in response to terrifying headlines, when a line of dialogue delivered with a chilling sense of dread did not even require acting." It was revolutionary theater.Fast forward twenty years and times have changed dramatically. The story of At Night We Walk in Circles has entered the 21st century and the aftermath of war. "No one cared about human rights anymore, not at home or abroad. They cared about growth." Dicembre's lead actor and playwright Henry Nunez and his friend, and fellow actor, Patalarga, plan a revival of Henry's most famous play to coincide with the fifteenth anniversary of its debut. The play is titled The Idiot President. Both men are now in their 40's and Henry is divorced and his age is showing. "These late middle years offended his vanity. He was looking forward to being old, when he would no longer be tormented by memories of youth." Perhaps one last hurrah might be attained performing for the people out in the provinces.Originally, back in 1986, Patalarga's wife Diana, was the third actor in the troupe, but she is not up for gallivanting about the provinces for weeks on end acting in this dated, farcical play. Instead she wants to have a baby. A young conservatory theater student named Nelson is hired on to play Diana's role of the president's son. The play consists of the president (Henry) and his son (Nelson) and the servant (Patalarga). The premise of the play is that every citizen of the country is afforded the privilege of attending to the president for one day. And at the end of that day the servant is sacrificed, his life is taken. Nelson is somewhat unmoored. It was long assumed that he would join his older brother, Francisco, in the United States. But Nelson's father died unexpectedly and he is now responsible for his widowed mother. And most significantly he is having an affair with his former girlfriend who is currently living with another man. Nelson cannot decide if he truly loves her. So Nelson thinks why not work on my craft under the tutelage of the celebrated, egomaniacal, revolutionary playwright, Henry Nunez. It would also give him the opportunity to sort his life out because "in the provinces time, we all knew, was a very relative concept. Such is the languorous nature of small town life. Thought slows, the need for conversation vanishes. You are prone to introspection. . ."Not yet mentioned, though significant, is the novel's structure. All of this information is being slowly revealed by an unnamed narrator who cryptically alludes to Nelson's eventual, and possibly, dire fate. I don't believe you would call him an "unreliable narrator", yet we ultimately discover his connection to the characters and the story and this helps to explain away occasional gaps and speculation as the novel has unfolded.While Dicembre puts on performances out in the countryside Alarcon shines with his vivid descriptions of the South American provinces and its compelling characters. It is also during these series of performances that aspects of Henry's and Nelson's lives emerge as somewhat of a soap opera. The true love of Henry's life was not the ex-wife who bore him a treasured daughter. It was his cellmate, Rogelio, from the notorious Collectors Prison where Henry was incarcerated for terrorist activities. Rogelio dies, along with 343 other inmates when the prison was assaulted by the army. It also comes to light that Nelson does, in fact, truly love his girlfriend Ixta and wants her back. He acknowledges this fact, before he finds out that she is pregnant.The troupe, quite coincidentally, finds its way to the home town of Henry's deceased lover Rogelio. It is at this point that the novel amps up to a frantic pace. There is a theatrical ruse, an unanticipated death and a murder. What ultimately happens to Nelson I will leave for you to discover. I will give you this one hint which is hidden deep within the text, "That's what I wanted. To enter the world of the play, and escape my life."I have read all of Daniel Alarcon's books, but I believe At Night We Walk in Circles to be his finest effort to date. I love his descriptions, whether atmospheric "Night had brought with it a blanket of wet, heavy fog, and the streetlights above flowered in hazy yellow bursts." Or, observational "Midday streets are very different from early morning streets--different in character, different in sound. There are more people, but they're less harried somehow; they're the late risers, the men and women escaping from work, not racing toward it." And the interesting aspects of South American life revealed. I loved the fact, I assume it is a fact, that bus company officials video tape passengers prior to treacherous mountain trips. If there is an accident, resulting in death, these video tapes are sent to the deceased 's family. If no accident occurs, then those tapes are merely taped over. Another, interesting item is that prison cells, in certain South American countries, have to be purchased. If you don't have funds to purchase a cell while you are in prison you are condemned to roam the grounds with no shelter.There is so much in this book to intellectually consider, aside from the entertaining storyline. There are a myriad of important concepts sprinkled throughout the novel. Not the least of which is personal identity and one's varied roles in life. One could even go deeper and explore Latin palindromes or mirror metaphors. But ultimately there is the novel's "crowning jewel" which is the surrealistic, indeterminate conclusion. I defy anyone, be it Harold Bloom or Michael Silverblatt not to re-read the final page.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    I just finished reading At Night We Walk In Circles. It was written by Daniel Alarcon. It's about a man who goes to uncover a story about an actor that he idolizes in a way. This actor had everything he wanted in life, or so it would seem. The only thing he didn't have was the woman he loved. In trying to win her back, something happens that ultimately leads to his downfall. I really enjoyed this book. I highly recommend it to anybody who likes to read books of this particular genre. I especially loved how the author chose to write about everybody's background stories and not just the main characters. I feel like it gave more understanding to the overall story. It made one understand how everything coincided with each other and fit. It made it understandable why the characters were in the book at all. I'm glad I had the opportunity to read this book. It was truly amazing and moving.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    "...the play is different every time."First -- thanks to LT early reviewers and to the publisher for my copy. Some time ago I read this author's Lost City Radio, and loved it. Absolutely. Now he's back with At Night We Walk in Circles, and I loved this one even more. The blurb describing what's on the inside doesn't even come close to describing what actually happens in this character-based novel, which I would say focuses largely on identity, how past events come to be re-imagined, and the effects of blurring the line between reality and artificiality. Without going into plot so much, the main thread of this story focuses on a journalist narrator who is trying to "decipher the mystery" around a "brief encounter" between himself and the main character Nelson, by interviewing "his confidantes, his lovers, his classmates, people who'd seen fit to trust me, as if by sharing their various recollections, w