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System Identification: Tutorials Presented at the 5th IFAC Symposium on Identification and System Parameter Estimation, F.R. Germany, September 1979

System Identification: Tutorials Presented at the 5th IFAC Symposium on Identification and System Parameter Estimation, F.R. Germany, September 1979

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System Identification: Tutorials Presented at the 5th IFAC Symposium on Identification and System Parameter Estimation, F.R. Germany, September 1979

Bewertungen:
4/5 (60 Bewertungen)
Länge:
67 Seiten
3 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
May 23, 2014
ISBN:
9781483139456
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

System Identification is a special section of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC)-Journal Automatica that contains tutorial papers regarding the basic methods and procedures utilized for system identification. Topics include modeling and identification; step response and frequency response methods; correlation methods; least squares parameter estimation; and maximum likelihood and prediction error methods.
After analyzing the basic ideas concerning the parameter estimation methods, the book elaborates on the asymptotic properties of these methods, and then investigates the application of the methods to particular model structures. The text then discusses the practical aspects of process identification, which includes the usual, general procedures for process identification; selection of input signals and sampling time; offline and on-line identification; comparison of parameter estimation methods; data filtering; model order testing; and model verification. Computer program packages are also discussed.
This compilation of tutorial papers aims to introduce the newcomers and non-specialists in this field to some of the basic methods and procedures used for system identification.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
May 23, 2014
ISBN:
9781483139456
Format:
Buch

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  • (4/5)
    A lone envoy from a loose federation of worlds has been sent down to a cold and snowy planet to establish diplomatic relations, with the goal of getting its leaders to join the alliance. It’s top-notch science fiction, and a groundbreaking look at human sexuality via this alien society whose members are androgynous and asexual, until they are in a mating period, at which point they can assume either female or male characteristics. Le Guin is masterful at creating the ice world of Gethen and the nuances of its culture and religions. She’s quite philosophical, as well as poetic in weaving myths and creation stories, giving the book real depth. Le Guin writes with great insight into the dynamics of power, which of course apply to our own world. Especially timely are her cautions against nationalism that is based on “fear of the other”, of leaders who rule by using anger and fear, and of nationalism enhanced by “rapid communication devices.” (I’m looking at you, Tweeter-in-Chief) One country on this world is rule by a “mad king”, and its rival is one that is ostensibly more egalitarian, with communal living areas, communal childraising after one year of age, state employment, and no inherited wealth. It’s a pretty clear allusion to America/Soviet Union, and she’s certainly cautionary of the latter as well. Information is much more tightly controlled there, and the envoy soon finds himself in a Siberia-like prison, suffering brutal conditions and torture. While sex is not a huge part of the story, I was fascinated by her consideration of the implications of sex in this society. Androgyny implied the absence of a set of privileged citizens and another set of second-class citizens based on the burden of childbirth or the division into strong/weak, dominant/submissive halves. Asexuality in the daily condition implied not only the absence of rape, but also the absence of war, which is pondered as a “masculine displacement-activity, a vast Rape.” It’s not to say Le Guin creates a utopian world, far from it – there is betrayal, inhumanity, and violence as the envoy tries to navigate through political intrigue - but she provocatively makes us think about these things, imagining if they were so for us, and she makes us think about how we think about women and those with non-binary sexuality. With an interesting perspective, it’s the envoy to the world, a “normal male” who is now sometimes referred to as the “pervert”. What sets the novel apart is the breadth of Le Guin’s intelligence and creativity. The Introduction alone, written in 1976 and seven years after the first edition, is a fantastic bit of writing. Great read.Quotes:On acceptance, and love:“And I saw then again, and for good, what I had always been afraid to see, and had pretended not to see in him: that he was a woman as well as a man. Any need to explain the sources of that fear vanished with the fear; what I was left with was, at last, acceptance of him as he was. Until then I had rejected him, refused him his own reality.”On duality:“Light is the left hand of darknessand darkness the right hand of light.Two are one, life and death, lyingtogether like lovers in kemmer,like hands joined together,like the end and the way.”
  • (4/5)
    This science fiction classic is beautifully written and beautifully constructed. It's world-driven and character-driven, so the experience of the book builds up over time as you get to know both. It took me a little while to feel at home in the narrative as it switched from the visiting Terran's report to the native Gethenian's diary, but once I got my bearings I enjoyed it a great deal, especially the bright, hard-edged folk tales that are larded throughout.The Terran narrator's gender essentialism -- his need to define himself by traditional masculinity, his rather stereotyped descriptions of Terran women -- was jarring to me, especially in the context of a far future narrative. However, the book is forty years old, and in Le Guin's words "the rather naive male narrator is a deliberate authorial outreach to male readers" [interview with Guernica magazine]. Perhaps I took him too literally.The Gethenian cultures are fascinating, not only for the androgyny of the people, but the societal results of living in such a bleak environment, with so few animals and so many hardships. The world has been carefully thought out, and the results are fascinating.The book is moving and thought-provoking, and succeeds in creating a powerful sense of place and landscape. Not only do I guess that the spaces visited in the book will linger in my mind, but I find that many of the cover illustrations I've seen look familiar -- the artist and I have both been to Karhide.
  • (4/5)
    At times the plot bogged down in a long journey over ice, but in general I loved the world building and political drama of the tale. I'd recommend this read even for non-sci fi readers.
  • (5/5)
    This was the first Le Guin book I read, and I had my doubts for the first few chapters, but as the main character embarks on his journey it picks up and after that, I couldn't put it down. The exploration of gender and climate in relation to culture is completely fascinating. A classic of progressive science fiction.

    .........

    I read it for the second time in December 2010, savoring the book a lot more, and it's just as excellent, having read much more of her work this time around. The use of "he" I find very difficult in immersing myself, so I actually did a "find-replace" and replaced "he" with "heshe" in the file ('cause I was reading it on my kindle), (and "his/her" "him/her") which kind of worked except of course when it was talking about Genly. i know it's a reflection of when she wrote it, and that she's given it a lot of thought, because in the Gethen story in "Birthday of the World", she uses "heshe".
  • (4/5)
    Just a good story. Had a lot of themes that I thought were worth exploring, and never once stepped over the boundary from exploration into preachiness. Even though the narrator was male, the story was set up so that you couldn't help but identify with both him and several other characters, despite their gaping differences. The pacing was a little erratic, but it's a book worth reading. I can see why it's a SF classic.
  • (4/5)
    A human amassador named Genly Ai comes to the planet of Winter, where gender is nonexistent.I want to start off by saying that I’m glad I read this book. I got a lot out of it, and I found Le Guin’s writing as lovely as always. However, the book made me think rather than feel, so I fear my review may seem rather critical. I don't intend to nitpick; this is just me engaging with the text.THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS isn't really about the plot or the characters; rather, Le Guin takes an idea and runs with it. She uses the entire book to explore notions of gender as a social construct, and I don’t think she does a bad job of it. I did, however, find her conception of gender a bit dated. The Gethenians are supposedly both male and female, with no predisposition towards behaviors we consider either masculine or feminine, but Le Guin still treats male as the default. Everyone is ‘he.’ There are Lords and Kings and brothers and sons. Furthermore, Ai attributes stereotypically masculine behaviors to almost everyone he comes across. When he does recognize stereotypical femininity in his acquaintances, he treats it as a negative because he views these people as male, above all else.I was willing to overlook this, given that Ai is a foreigner who comes from a culture that holds particular views on masculinity and femininity. He can’t help but impose his own worldview on everything he encounters, and his views do evolve as the book progresses. The terminology is all in translation, too, within the context of the novel; Ai may say King and son and he, but those are just his (loaded) translations of the terms the Gethenians use.But a couple of chapters in in, Le Guin begins showing us events from a local's perspective… and ‘he’ seems to hold similar views. Estraven (the local) is certainly not as extreme as Ai, but ‘he’ still displays many of the same attitudes. ‘He’ attributes many stereotypically masculine behaviors to ‘his’ fellows, and ‘he’ describes them using the same masculine terminology (which we’ve already established is in translation, if still heavily loaded towards the masculine norm).Hmmm.Now, I’ve only read this book once, and I don't hold it near and dear to my heart. I know many of you do. That said, my one-timer’s opinion is that THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS isn’t so much about a society divorced from gender-based behavioral patterns as it is about a society in which male individuals are in no way penalized or looked down upon for embracing female sexuality.It does make for some interesting reading, and Le Guin’s writing is just beautiful. But, as is almost always the case with her work, I felt too distanced from it to really commit to the ideas. I rarely feel strongly about books where the characters are just a vehicle for a concept. I want to believe in these people. I want to get caught up in their struggles. I want to bawl my eyes out when things go badly for them.I couldn’t do so here. I didn’t really care about either Ai or Estraven. The ideas in play are interesting, yes. I got a lot out of them, and out of this book. I enjoyed it. But I was never really engaged; I never felt the story.I’m glad I read this, but I don't think I'll feel the need to revisit it.(A slightly different version of this review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • (4/5)
    I consider myself an avid SF reader, but have recently found myself being drawn more towards the fantasy end of the spectrum. In order to correct this trend, I decided to make more of an effort to seek out some science fiction. The Left Hand of Darkness seemed to be an ideal choice since it won both a Nebula and a Hugo when it was first published and more recently won a Gaylactic Spectrum Award with a Tiptree Award on top of that.I must admit though, it took me a little while to get into the book. But once I did, it was marvelous. Genly Ai has been sent to the planet Gethen, also known as "Winter" due to its harsh arctic climate, to persuade its inhabitants to join the Ekumen, an intergalactic federation of planets. Gethenians are physiologically unique among humans--for most of the month, they are sexless. Only during the few days in which they are in kemmer do they become male or female. The book mostly follows Genly Ai and his struggle to complete his mission, despite political intrigue and his own discomfort in a genderless world. His best hope, whether he knows it or not, is Estraven--the one person he distrusts the most.The novel's strong points are its ideas and concepts, the underlying philosophy and spirituality, human nature and politics; plot and characterization are a bit weaker, at least towards the beginning. The prose can be a bit ponderous as well. The chapters that push the plot (the little that there is) are punctuated with chapters of folklore, mythology, and field notes. Some might feel these are distracting and unnecessary, but I believe they add a significant amount of depth to the book. I loved the ice crossing (I think it was the best part) and by the end I loved Estraven (I really wish we got to know more about him, although quite a bit is implied). Even though it was slow to start, it was worth it in the end.Experiments in Reading
  • (4/5)
    Fantastic little book about the nature of gender, and the differences it might make in a society of androgynous people.

    I have to say that the journey the main character goes through, as he comes to grips with how his gender has shaped his identity, and the general loss of that aspect has shook his foundation of how he views himself was one of the best images I've found in science fiction. I much prefer these character driven pieces as opposed to the GIANT SPACESHIP WITH THE-OH CRAP REVERSE POLARITY ON THE MACGUFFIN DYLITHO-FLORICA-HERORIDE WARP DRIVE space babble.
  • (4/5)
    Ce sixième roman du cycle de l'Ekumen écrit par l'Américaine Ursula K. Le Guin aborde une nouvelle fois la thématique de l'autre et des rapports humains, traités comme toujours avec beaucoup d'humanisme et de bienveillance. L'auteur y fait preuve d'une originalité qui perdure cinquante ans ans après sa parution, ce qui est plus que notable. Une très belle réussite et sûrement le meilleur roman de son cycle de l'Ekumen.
  • (4/5)
    Genly Ai, An envoy from planet Terra comes to Gethen with the mission of inviting it to join the Ekumen, a sort of confederation of planets, each with its own laws. The Gethenians differ from humans as we know them by being androgynous, or ambisexual - functioning on a 26-day cycle that includes two days when they become sexually active and can become male or female (thus at one point the king of the country Karhide becomes pregnant). The action is heavily steeped in politics but also includes a heart-stopping escape on skis over a glacier lasting several months (that seems worse than the Worst Journey in the World) where the two protagonists (Genly Ai and a Gethenian, I will not say who to keep suspense) become more than friends and reveal aspects of life in their alien worlds. I found the book very moving and well-written, but there were some aspects that were too familiar, too earthly: there are no winged creatures on Gethen so the inhabitants have never invented aircraft yet they have motorized or electric vehicles, sledges, skis, plastics, polymers, aluminium; they divide their day into ten hours but measure weight in pounds, distances in feet, yards and miles, temperatures in °C; they communicate by telephone, record on tapes and listen to the radio. And Estrevan writes things down in his little notebook - what alphabet does he use, I wonder?Many illustrations in this Folio Society edition that made me feel the cold through to my bones.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best scifi novels ever. A very insightful story of characters in a scifi setting.
  • (4/5)
    Really enjoyed this book! The Gethenian tales interspersed through the book were really interesting. Le Guin did an awesome job, as always.
  • (4/5)
    With the recent death of Ursula Le Guin, a friend urged me to read The Left Hand of Darkness. At first I found it difficult to relate to the world of the story, but very soon was drawn into the setting and the characters. This is a world of space travel and new countries where there is no gender differentiation, and gender fluidity is the norm. It shines a bright light on the questions of what makes a male or a female. These are questions as relevant today as when the book was published almost five decades ago.I found that the questions of patriotism and what it means to 'love' a country are especially timely in the present political climate.
  • (4/5)
    The book deserves better than four stars. It s quite a masterpiece and has thrilling scenes. But, I was disconnected at a few parts, and didn't really appreciate all of the side lore. Some pieces were introduced too early for me and took me out of the story.

    I think reviews and description of the novel led me to believe it to be more sexually and gender - wise enlightened. My expectations were not met. Honestly, it seemed rather sexist. Female kemmer as seductor; Genly's description of women reminded me of the decade in which the book was written; and generally the overuse of male pronouns and overlay of feminine features on men. One could argue that the male protagonist/narrator simply defaults others to his own sex, but it is weird to me since female features seem to dominate human sexes (E.g. nipples). X chromosomes suggest that female pronouns would make more sense.
  • (3/5)
    This was a very interesting book. The world that Le Guin created was so different and intriguing and I really enjoyed the intricacies of the planet and it's nations. The writing was complex, yet easy to understand and follow and really sucked you in. She created this atmosphere of mystery and intrigue and I wanted to know how things would turn out. The characters we also fascinating. I enjoyed seeing their different perspectives - that of the "alien" and that of the native to the planet.

    I enjoyed the subtle themes in this novel as well. That of acceptance and change, I enjoyed the fluidity of gender and identity and how it explored the sexuality of the characters.

    Overall, I enjoyed this, but I felt like I read it at the wrong time. It was not a fast read and I had a bit of a hard time getting into it, but I can definitely appreciate this work for what it is.
  • (5/5)
    One of my all-time favorite books. I reread it every few years.
  • (4/5)
    I decided to read this book again- I did so 30 years ago when I was in college, and didn't remember anything about it except that I liked it back then. At that time, I read a bunch of Leguin's books, and liked them all; my memory is that her stories all center on arduous physical journeys, and this book certainly has that.Genly Ai is an envoy of the Ekumen, a loose confederation of worlds, and he is the lone envoy on a cold humanoid world nicknamed "Winter" by his people due to its unpleasant climate. Winter is populated by people who have somehow evolved as sexually neutral; they are generally asexual, but when "in kemmer" (kind of like being in heat) they develop either male or female genitalia and can either sire or carry a child depending on with whom they couple. The sexual life of the people on Winter obviously has lots of implications for their culture, which Leguin threshes out to a degree, but which could have been fleshed out even more.The world is divided into a few distinct countries; Ai starts off in Karhide, a monarchy in which the king replaces his prime minister, Estraven, early in the book, and banishes him. Estraven and Ai both go to the neighboring country, which seems like a communist place based on the Soviet Union (the book was written in 1969). There, Estraven is safe but Ai falls victim to political intrigue and ends up in peril.The rest of the book consists of a lengthy and perilous journey that I won't spoil.This book won the Hugo and Nebula awards, and is a classic in the genre. Leguin is great at world-building, and the characters are interesting. Sometimes she goes a little heavy on foreign (made up) words with explanations that are a bit vague (though I don't doubt they're not vague in her mind), making it difficult to follow.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first introduction to LeGuin. I enjoyed her writing style and her efforts for portraying the dual world of the Cold War. The parallels were clear which made it an interesting reflection. I did find some passages lengthy although, surprisingly not the long trek through the ice which I found compelling thanks to her mastery of the language.I'm glad I stuck it through but not sure I will read another since I'm not usually drawn to political satires.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book, it's a classic for reasons. Loved the story, the adventure, the political intrigue and the corruption, the icyness of the world that gets mirrored in the people, the incredible prison escape and the journey over the ice. It has everything that makes it a thrilling story.And so much more. The characters were fascinating, Ai as a stranger in a really strange land, and Estraven, the native in this genderless, ambisexual society where sex only becomes relevant during kemmer, a few days per month, when people become men or women. The consequences for Ai who is a "normal" male, his confrontation with his own sex, his relationship to women, his relationship to people who don't fit into the established human pattern, the anthropoligical, psychological and sociological implications, all this gets dealt with. And its fascinating, especially in light of the fact that the book is 50 years old.Today's criticism that it is still too gendered, that Le Guin wasn't radical enough in her exploration of the influence of gender and sexuality on society, is at least partially justified - as she admitted herself. That doesn't make it less a milestone for SF as a whole, for the topic of feminism in SF and for the acceptance of female authors in that testosterone-saturated genre.
  • (4/5)
    There's something about Le Guin's writing which I find hypnotic, and her characters & narrators normally pull me in almost immediately, so that I feel a story as it unfolds and can't look away. For some reason, though, I found it hard to move into this particular book. As always, the concept, writing, and world drew me in... but I just couldn't stay involved, to the extent that I kept find myself having to re-read pages because my mind had wandered away--which almost never happens when I'm reading, truth be told. About halfway through the book, I found myself more engaged and not wanting to put the book down, but it did take that long.I've read from a few reviews that this can be one of Le Guin's slower works or take re-reads, so I may read it again one of these days. Meanwhile, though, I'd certainly recommend it to her fans, and to fans of classic sci-fi. But, for readers who haven't already fallen in love with Le Guin, I'd probably recommend them starting somewhere else.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book - after a slow start it increasingly engaged me and I started to care about Ai and Estraven.
    Overall, to me, the story was about relationships. Despite their differences Ai and Estraven find a mutual understanding and come to a friendship based on their individual qualities. This is highlighted by the asexuality of the Gethenians.
    A clever, slow burning, insightful story.
  • (4/5)
    My first Ursula K. Le Guin book and I thought it was fantastic! Tipped to the book from watching "The Jane Austin Book Club" on cable, it's probably one of the reasons the 70s is considered the heyday of sci-fi novels.

    Highly recommended for sci-fi lovers and novices and anyone who hasn't read any Le Guin yet.
  • (4/5)
    My second foray into Le Guin's works after the Earthsea Quartet, and I quite enjoyed it. This reminded me in a few very welcome ways of Islandia, what with the envoy going to a different place and confronting very different ways of doing things, &c. Looking forward to my next adventure into Le Guin's fascinating worlds ...
  • (3/5)
    Ehh... it's okay. There's a lot of prose thick with 'heavy ideas' to chew on. The language has a rhythm to it, which I like, but I couldn't connect with the story.
  • (4/5)
    Male ambassador explores androgynous society, calls everyone "he/him".
  • (4/5)
    Very complex, thoughtful book. It took a while to force myself into it but it was well worth it.
  • (5/5)
    My audio re-read of Le Guin's very fine first Hugo winner was a very great pleasure. The years since its publication have not dimmed its brilliance.

  • (5/5)
    It's a great thing when your main criticism of a book is that it didn't do more of the excellent stuff that it did. The central theme here of an androgynous humanity that goes into heat ("kemmer") and takes on gender characteristics briefly is explored fulsomely in terms of its physiology and psychology (both within the people of Gethen and between them and the "Envoy" Genly Ai, a traditional male who comes from space to inaugurate them into the interstellar order. The jump to sociology is made, though imperfectly--we think of sexual difference as something that breeds difficulty, mars-and-venus stuff, but the machinations of all against all and the extreme concern with a kind of inverse face ("shifgrethor")--not one's own concern with one's own prestige, but one's careful concern to avoid impinging on the prestigelessness of the other (while still living on a planet full of social injustice etc.)--make you realize with, yes, a bit of a chill ("Gethen" means "Winter" and it is a planet of ice) what it might mean not to be purpose-built to love each other physically--what it might mean for anyone to be equally a potential lover or foe, but only the latter role (barring a kind of pairbonding they do do, but that seems a largely private rather than social institution) being a permanent one. This then leading into trying to really grapple with a society that operates without our concern for binaries, where unity is their permanent obsession (a kind of felt Taoism, but really something far far more pervasive and mundane to those who live it)--"the right hand is the left hand of darkness, the left the right of light."And all of this on a planet where working together is non-negotiable for survival, and where Ai and his Gethenian friend Estraven (who he doesn't even recognize is his friend for tragically long, since the latter is trying to patiently, toughly work to make Ai's mission a success and effect the contact between planets within the constraints of shifgrethor, and Ai doesn't get it at all and just sees him as a cold, ambitious politico and a user) take their epic trek across the ice (Le Guin missing her chance to make sexy SF history by not having them sleep together, but they do talk about it and maybe I'm not getting how discouraging her choice would have been to young queer and trans SF readers in the seventies looking to find reading, finally, that tries to speak, in a way, to that part of them, or just to invent not only "soft" SF but intergalactic slash fiction.That's all great, and if the nationalist plot leaves me cold--a planet of androgynous unity fanatics/suspicious monads is not where I want to go to get my story of two mighty nations divided by a mutual hatred--we can let that pass. No, what I wanted was more culture--to visit the other nations of Gethen, learn not only about their religion (a cultural phenomenon sure but one so supersaturated with psychosocial significance that it gets deployed in the service of the main big themes, directly--we end up with the Taoist-analogue future predictors and the weird Jesus-style monopositivist cult, which plays into the plot of nations but seems basically irrelevant and out of place given the book's themes) but about their, oh, classical dance, pop music, philosophy of science (like, Ai's comment on how it's so amazing that the Gethenians came up with a concept of evolution being the only mammals on the planet is a great start, but then it just goes back to the big theme of their aloneness), publishing industry, websites. Gethen is a low-wealth place focused on survival, but it is an advanced society, and I just wanted to see Le Guin make it sing. She may not have intended to, per se--this is like an essay in fiction--but she does such a good job at that essay that it makes you want to see Gethen given a life in full.
  • (4/5)
    Science fiction novel exploring the relationship between men and women and its impact on society through the plot of a man from Earth visiting a planet where people are androgynous. More exciting than it sounds. Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    I am probably not giving this book the credit that it is due as far as number of stars is concerned. This is chiefly because it's taken me the better part of a month to read a well-crafted story so that by the end, some of the key plot points I had lost. However, when looking at the Left Hand of Darkness from the perspective of 1969 when it was written, there are many elements that reflect the tumultuous society that the US was at that time. A tale of allegory, so to speak with ideas that would've been so far from the social norms that they would have been considered revelatory at that time.Genly Ai comes to Karhide alone from a distant galaxy to pave the way for the planet to become part of the Ekumen. However, nothing goes as plans, his supporter Estraven is declared a traitor and banished. Genly leaves Karhide to go to the other country on Winter, a planet perpetually cold and ends up imprisoned. Thanks to Estraven, who breaks him out of the Pulafen Farm Rehabilitation Center, they end up crossing 800 miles of frozen land to return to Karhide and signal Genly's Ekumen. Of course, things do not go as planned.