Genießen Sie von Millionen von eBooks, Hörbüchern, Zeitschriften und mehr - mit einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $11.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Der Duft des Regens
Der Duft des Regens
Der Duft des Regens
eBook391 Seiten7 Stunden

Der Duft des Regens

Bewertung: 3.5 von 5 Sternen

3.5/5

()

Vorschau lesen

Über dieses E-Book

In den Wäldern im Westen Kanadas ist die Welt noch in Ordnung - zumindest für die Schwestern Maggie und Jenny. Sie lieben ihre Ausflüge zu den Seen, sammeln Pilze und Beeren, die Eltern spielen abends Karten. Doch Maggie ist eine geborene "Sorgenmacherin", sie kann nicht anders, sie fürchtet um das Wohl ihrer Liebsten. Als der Vater bei einem Unfall ums Leben kommt, fühlt sie sich in ihren tiefsten Ängsten bestätigt, schlimmer noch: Es scheint sich die im Dorf vorherrschende Überzeugung zu bewahrheiten, dass ein Unglück selten allein kommt. Auf der Suche nach einem Lebensunterhalt lässt die Mutter die Mädchen bei einer fremden Familie zurück, vorübergehend, sagt sie. Doch Tage werden zu Wochen, Wochen zu Monaten und dann zu Jahren - Irene bleibt verschwunden. Schließlich macht Maggie sich auf, die Mutter zu finden. Ihre Reise führt sie in Irenes Vergangenheit, bis an die Küste, zu einem alten Boot namens "Elsa"...

Einfühlsam hinterfragt Frances Greenslade unsere Erwartungen an die Menschen, die unsere Eltern sind. Dass Maggie ihre Mutter nicht nur finden, sondern vor allem verstehen will, wie sie und ihre Schwester dem Leben trotzen und zu starken jungen Frauen heranwachsen, davon erzählt dieser Roman in anrührender und mitreißender Weise. Die mystische Welt der kanadischen Wildnis wird so intensiv beschrieben, dass man zwischen den Seiten den Duft von Regen, Zedern und Meer in der Nase hat.
SpracheDeutsch
Herausgebermareverlag
Erscheinungsdatum4. Juli 2014
ISBN9783866483026
Der Duft des Regens
Vorschau lesen

Ähnlich wie Der Duft des Regens

Ähnliche E-Books

Ähnliche Artikel

Verwandte Kategorien

Rezensionen für Der Duft des Regens

Bewertung: 3.625 von 5 Sternen
3.5/5

8 Bewertungen8 Rezensionen

Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?

Zum Bewerten, tippen

Die Rezension muss mindestens 10 Wörter umfassen

  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    This was a beautiful story about the relationship between sisters and about the relationship between daughters and their mother. This was beautifully written and I connected so well with the characters that I couldn't put it down. The relationship between Maggie and Jenny reminded me of my sister and I. I can't say that the relationship between Irene and her daughters reminded me of my mom and my sister and I though. I enjoyed the complexities in all the relationships in this book. I have to say that I was completely hooked on the book and so attached to it up until a point. That point being when Rita tells Maggie the story that Irene told her. For some reason while reading that part I just felt less connected with the characters and the story and my interest in it dropped off a little. I did enjoy the ending though and I would recommend this book to others. I feel like this would be a great read for mothers and daughters and sisters to enjoy together.[I received an ARC from the publisher, which in no way affects the content of my review]
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Shelter by Frances GreensladeISBN: 9781451661101Starts out when Maggie was being told from her dad how to build a shelter. He used to work in Oregon but traveled north to BC to live off the land and avoid the Korean draft. He had come over from Ireland and had enough battles.He knew many ways to make a shelter and she watched.Scene at the homefront reminded me of when we first moved to the island-we had to carry our 5 gallon buckets of water up the hill 300 yards and we had no heat for the first several months, outdoor bushes for the bathroom.After their fathers death they move to a camp where Irene, the mother cooks for those who come to camp. After summer they move in with a local woman who can do/fix anything. After a time they have to leave there and Irene puts thekids in a home with friends of the family-The Edwards while she goes to the logging camps to cook. no kids allowed but her kids will be able to attend school.When Ted develops cancer she spends time with him in the hospital where he's on morphine for the pain. He tells her all about her father. She and her sister now work after school and their mother's last letter stated she wasn't feeling very well.They stopped receiving money after that.Maddie plans a weekend trip to try to find her mother, along with her sister and meet up with some crazy people while hitchhiking.When Jennie gets pregnant from a boy who's left the area. Bea makes a call and ships her out to a home for unwed mothers run by nuns.She finally tracks down someone who knows Irene's past and divulges secrets to her in hopes it will lead her to find her mother...Love all the descriptions about the meadows of flowers and other nature. Also learning what they used to keep the deer out of the garden, gonna have to try it.Canasta talk is cool to read about. Quilt making and the patterns from the Indian tribe women.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Read from Aug 14-16, 2012It's interesting how what you choose to read works with or against what you just read. I read Among Others a couple of books ago -- also about sisters in the 70s. Of course, these two books aren't terribly similar, but when it comes to relationships, the sisterly dynamic is one I like to read about most.Shelter's main character, Maggie, is a worrier. I immediately liked her! One that worries, I can always relate to that. We meet her family -- her mom, her dad, her sister -- and then things go bad. Her father dies and her mom abandons her daughters, but Maggie is tough.I enjoyed the sense of place created by Greenslade -- rural British Columbia isn't really an area I knew anything about. And I definitely think this is a great book for discussion (especially for moms!).
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    I thought this was extremely well written, and the characters were quite good. However, the ending felt rushed and abrupt, and spoiled much of the impact of the novel for me.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Every now and then I find a book that I can’t put down. Equally infrequently I find a book that is painful to read, either because it is so realistic and the material is difficult for me to get through or because the book is not very well written. Shelter: A Novel by Frances Greenslade was painful for me to read and it fell into the realistic category. There is no doubt about it that Greenslade is a talented writer, but a book written about two girls who have what seems to them like a happy family that implodes within a year is gritty and you keep wanting something to change for them. There is little redemptive value or a-ha moment coming from the clouds and throughout the novel I found myself wishing that I could quit the book because it just didn’t seem fair that so much could happen to two people.Maggie and Jenny are two sisters whose parents do not have much, but there is a lot of love in the family. Their father is a logger and dies in a freak logging accident, which sends their mother into a tailspin. In her unsuccessful attempt to keep them together, she gives them to friends of their father’s and makes some decisions that affect all of their lives forever. When she suddenly stops writing to them and sending money to their foster parents, Maggie and Jenny are left wondering what happened to her and, worst of all, was it their fault? Shelter takes us through their brief journey to discover what happened during those years and to learn where their mother went when she abandoned them. Most of all, their journey to discover why is one that is fraught with emotion. This is a dramatic novel and, with such well done writing, I found it difficult to look upon the characters with detachment. It is not for the faint of heart.I received a copy of this book for free in order to review it on my blog. All thoughts on this book are honest and my own.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Greenslade’s beautiful debut novel (after the memoir By a Secret Ladder) chronicles the struggles of sisters Maggie and Jenny as they attempt to make sense of a life without parents in rural Duchess Creek, Canada, in the 1970s. Summary BPLI read this one—perhaps too quickly—in almost one sitting. Maggie and Jenny are like people you’re related to, and the characters they interact with are as familiar as family stories. On a literal level, it’s easy to connect with this one. But there’s another level below and it’s much bigger….Shelter talks about different kinds of love and different kinds of shelter in an engaging, true way. The title refers ostensibly to Maggie’s father: he teaches her how to stay alive in the woods by making a shelter from whatever materials are to hand….an important life lesson as well as theme.8 out 10. For readers who enjoy Canadian settings, domestic fiction and something to think about.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Maggie and her slightly older sister Jenny live pretty happily, if a bit unorthodox, with their parents in the Pacific mountains. A logging accident takes the life of their father and that is when everything changes. The mother eventually leaves the girls with friends of the fathers, promising to pick them up after she finishes working as a cook at the logging camps. Although in the beginning she sends money and short letters to the girls eventually they hear nothing further from her. At one point, Jenny asks Maggie if they should find her, but Maggie says "She's the mother." Implying it was her job to keep her word and take care of them. Than she says, "Up to than she had been the best kind of mother." With these words she grabbed a hold of my heart and didn't let go. This is a wonderful, heartbreaking novel of mothers and daughter, sisters, secret lives and family ties. It is a poignant read and the author does a great job with the characters of Jenny and Maggie. Really feel like I was right there with them, searching for their mother and suffering all their heartbreaks and fears along the way.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    :I would say that the title Shelter appropriately sums up what this book is about. It's the search for physical shelter, monetary shelter, emotional shelter. Maggie, Jennie, their mother, and many of the other characters are all searching for it in different ways. Will they find it? You have to read the book to find out.This book was beautiful in many ways but I found myself having a hard time with the narrative coming from a preteen girl. It just never rang quite true to me. The story it self never became a completely cohesive work for me. I still think that the book has interesting things to say. I especially liked the peek into the life of a logger and the interactions we see with the Indian community in the area. The beautiful friendship between Maggie and Vern is a heart melting coming of age tale.I'm left with the feeling that I missed something in my reading of this story. A link, an event, a remark that tied it all together. I didn't find it but the book, was still worth the read. Many of the sub-stories made for good stories. I would love to hear others' thought after they've read it.

Buchvorschau

Der Duft des Regens - Frances Greenslade

mareverlag

Nahrung

1

Jenny hat mich gebeten, das Ganze aufzuschreiben. Sie wollte, dass ich es für sie sortiere, auffädele, Perle um Perle, eine Geschichte daraus mache, wie einen Rosenkranz, den sie abzählen und immer wieder aufsagen kann. Aber ich habe es auch für sie geschrieben. Für Mom, oder Irene, wie die anderen sie nannten, denn den Teil von sich, der »Mom« war, hatte sie schon vor langer Zeit hinter sich gelassen. Selbst jetzt steigen immer noch Schuldgefühle in uns auf, wenn wir an sie denken. Wir haben nicht versucht, unsere Mutter zu finden. Sie war fort, wie eine Katze, die eines Abends durch die Hintertür verschwindet und nicht mehr wiederkommt, und du weißt nicht, ob ein Kojote sie sich geschnappt hat oder ein Raubvogel oder ob sie krank geworden ist und es nicht mehr nach Hause geschafft hat. Wir ließen die Zeit vergehen, wir warteten voll Vertrauen, denn sie war immer eine wunderbare Mutter gewesen. Sie ist die Mutter, sagten wir uns wieder und wieder, zumindest in der ersten Zeit. Ich weiß nicht mehr, wer damit angefangen hat.

Nein, das stimmt nicht. Ich war es. Jenny sagte: »Wir sollten sie suchen.« Und ich sagte: »Sie ist die Mutter.« Als ich das sagte, ahnte ich nicht, welche Macht diese paar Worte in unserem Leben bekommen würden. Sie hatten den bedeutungsvollen, unantastbaren Klang der Wahrheit, aber sie wurden zu einem Anker, der uns von unseren ureigensten Impulsen zurückzerrte. Wir warteten darauf, dass sie kam und uns holte, aber sie tat es nicht.

Es gab keine Anzeichen dafür, dass dies passieren würde. Ich weiß, die Leute suchen immer nach Anzeichen, weil sie dann sagen können, Wir gehören nicht zu den Leuten, denen so etwas passiert – als würden wir dazugehören, als hätten wir es wissen müssen. Aber es gab keine Anzeichen. Nichts außer meiner ständigen Sorge, mit der ich wahrscheinlich schon auf die Welt gekommen bin, falls man als Sorgenmacherin geboren werden kann. Jenny glaubt, man kann.

Sorgen waren in jede Nische rund um mein Herz gestopft wie Zeitungspapier in die Ritzen einer Hüttenwand, und sie erdrückten die Leichtigkeit, die dort hätte sein sollen. Ich bin jetzt alt genug, um zu wissen, dass es Menschen gibt, die sich nicht ständig vom Schatten der Katastrophe bedroht fühlen, die überzeugt sind, dass ihr Leben immer eine wohlgeordnete, offene Ebene ohne Hindernisse sein wird, mit blauem Himmel und klar erkennbarem Weg. Meine Besorgnis führte dazu, dass ich mich zurückzog. Ich konnte nicht wie Jenny sein, die so offen war wie ein sonniger Tag, an dem es nichts anderes zu tun gab, als auf der Wiese zu liegen, den warmen Boden und den leichten Wind zu spüren und dem Summen der Insekten zu lauschen. Bald, demnächst, nie – diese Wörter existierten für sie nicht. Jenny war immer und ja.

Wie ich schon sagte, es gab keinerlei Anzeichen dafür, dass an den kleinen, vertrauten Orten, aus denen unsere Welt bestand, irgendetwas schiefgehen könnte. Das Zimmer, in dem Jenny und ich schliefen, war türkisblau gestrichen, und wenn die Morgensonne hereinschien, kam man sich vor wie im Innern eines Vogeleis. Ich sah zu, wie das Licht wanderte, und nach einer Weile bildeten sich auf der gemaserten Oberfläche der Holzwand winzige Hügel und Täler. Der Morgen in diesem Land kam langsam, durchzogen von dunstigem Licht, das sich nur allmählich in den hellen Schein des Tages verwandelte.

Unser Haus in Duchess Creek hatte einen ganz eigenen Geruch, der mich schon an der Haustür begrüßte, eine Mischung aus gekochten Rüben, Tomatensuppe und gebratenem Hackfleisch, die in den Vorhängen hing, in den dünnen Wänden und Decken oder im Zeitungspapier, das als Isolierung diente. Es war ein warmes Haus, sagte Mom, aber von Leuten gebaut, die nicht vorhatten zu bleiben. Die Küchenschränke hatten keine Türen, und das Bad war nur durch einen schweren, geblümten Vorhang vom Hauptraum abgetrennt. Die Elektrizität hielt 1967 Einzug in Duchess Creek, in dem Jahr, als ich sieben wurde und Jenny acht. Ein paar Monate später wurde ein schlaffes Kabel durch die Bäume auch zu unserem Haus verlegt. Doch wir hatten nur ab und zu Strom, und nur für die Lampen.

Wir hatten einen kleinen elektrischen Herd, den einer von Dads Freunden auf der Müllhalde in Williams Lake gefunden und uns mitgebracht hatte, aber er wurde nie angeschlossen. Mom störte das nicht, obwohl ihre Freundin Glenna sie alle paar Tage fragte, wann sie endlich den Herd in Betrieb nehmen würde. Glenna sagte: »Bist du denn nicht froh, dass wir endlich im zwanzigsten Jahrhundert angekommen sind?« Darauf meinte Mom, wenn sie im zwanzigsten Jahrhundert leben wollte, würde sie nach Vancouver ziehen. Glenna schüttelte lachend den Kopf und sagte: »Tja, du bist anscheinend nicht die Einzige, die so denkt. Es gibt Leute, die finden es toll, dass Williams Lake weit und breit die größte Stadt ist.«

Im Chilcotin, wo wir lebten, gab es Indianer, die Chilcotin und die Carrier, die schon lange vor den Weißen dort gewesen waren. Ihre Wege und Handelsrouten zogen sich immer noch kreuz und quer durch das Land. Dann gab es die weißen Siedler, deren Geschichte aus Erkunden und Niederlassen und Straßenbauen bestand. Und dann gab es die Nachzügler wie unsere Familie, die Dillons.

Dad hatte 1949 Irland verlassen mit dem Ziel Amerika, war in Oregon gelandet und dann weiter nach Norden gekommen. Andere kamen, um nicht an Kriegen teilnehmen zu müssen, an die sie nicht glaubten, oder einer Lebensweise zu entgehen, die ihnen widerstrebte. Manche kamen aus Städten, ihren gesamten Besitz im Auto, und suchten einen Ort in der Wildnis, der ihnen Zuflucht bieten würde. Sie waren eine neue Art von Pionieren, die ihr Leben nach ihren eigenen Vorstellungen gestalten wollten. Dad hatte einen Freund namens Teepee Fred und einen anderen namens Panbread. Als ich ihn fragte, wie die beiden mit Nachnamen hießen, sagte er, er hätte sie nie danach gefragt.

Mom legte keinen großen Wert auf den Elektroherd, weil sie gelernt hatte, auf dem Holzofen zu kochen. Sie kochte aus Notwendigkeit, nicht weil es ihr Spaß machte, und hielt sich meist an Eintopfgerichte, bei denen sie nichts backen oder braten musste. Wir hatten auch keinen elektrischen Kühlschrank, sondern nur eine zerkratzte alte Eiskiste, in der eine einsame Milchflasche und ein Pfund Butter residierten.

Hinter dem Haus war eine Pumpe, aus der wir unser Wasser holten. Einer unserer Vorgänger hatte offenbar einmal vorgehabt, einen Wasseranschluss ins Haus zu legen. Im Bad gab es eine Dusche und ein Waschbecken und ein mit Lumpen zugestopftes Loch im Fußboden, wo man eine Toilette anschließen konnte, aber nichts davon funktionierte. Wir pumpten unser Wasser in einen Zwanziglitereimer, den wir auf die Arbeitsfläche in der Küche stellten. Wir hatten ein Plumpsklo, aber nachts legten wir einen Klodeckel über einen Blecheimer, den Dad dann morgens leerte.

Direkt am Waldrand hinter dem Haus hatte Dad extra für Mom eine schwere alte Badewanne mit Füßen aufgestellt. Darunter hatte er ein Loch ausgehoben, in dem er ein kleines Feuer machte. Dann füllte er die Wanne mit einem Schlauch, den er an die Pumpe anschloss. Wenn das Wasser schön warm war, setzte Mom sich hinein, und zwar auf einen Einsatz aus Zedernholz, den er gezimmert hatte, damit sie sich nicht verbrannte. An manchen Abenden hörten wir sie da draußen singen. Ihre Stimme schwebte durch die Dunkelheit, getragen vom Dampf, der hinter dem von Dad gebastelten Sichtschutz aus Tannenzweigen aufstieg. Manchmal saß ich neben ihr auf einem Baumstumpf und ließ den Arm im warmen Wasser treiben. Fledermäuse schwirrten um uns herum, lautlose Schatten, nur eine Bewegung im Augenwinkel. Die Sterne wurden immer heller und so dicht wie eine Mückenwolke, während das Wasser abkühlte. Und ich dachte, falls sie einen Beweis brauchte, dass Dad sie liebte, dann war es die Badewanne.

Es muss eine Zeit gegeben haben, als ich sing