Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Ausweitung der Kampfzone

Ausweitung der Kampfzone

Vorschau lesen

Ausweitung der Kampfzone

Bewertungen:
2.5/5 (11 Bewertungen)
Länge:
163 Seiten
2 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 30, 2015
ISBN:
9783803141828
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Sein erster heftig umstrittener Roman, mit dem er bereits zu Weltruhm gelangte und nicht nur in Frankreich die Öffentlichkeit polarisierte: Michel Houellebecq beschreibt die um Liebe reduzierte erotische Kampfzone der modernen Welt.

Kaum je hat ein Autor in der französischen Öffentlichkeit ein solches von leidenschaftlichen Diskussionen begleitetes Echo gefunden wie Michel Houellebecq mit seinem ersten Roman. Es wurde in Windeseile zum Kultbuch, rückhaltlos gepriesen und wütend geschmäht. Heute gilt es vielen als Houellebecqs bestes Buch, sein Titel ist bereits zum Sprichwort geworden.
Ein junger Informatiker, der für eine Pariser Software- Firma arbeitet, ist der Held der in einem straff gespannten Bogen erzählten Handlung. Seine betriebsame, aber kommunikationslose Umgebung versteht er meisterhaft zu sezieren. Dann unternimmt er eine Dienstreise in die Provinz, gemeinsam mit einem ebenso erotomanischen wie verklemmten Kollegen, einer Verkörperung all jener Eigenschaften, die er an seinen Mitmenschen verachtet. Am Weihnachtsabend, in einer Diskothek, drückt er ihm ein Messer in die Hand . . .
Freigegeben:
Jan 30, 2015
ISBN:
9783803141828
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


Ähnlich wie Ausweitung der Kampfzone

Ähnliche Bücher

Ähnliche Artikel


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Ausweitung der Kampfzone denken

2.7
11 Bewertungen / 12 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    The title fits the theme of the story perfectly. The narrator suffers from manic depression, and in turn has a completely apathetic and cynical world view. This was my first Houellebecq novel, so I won't be too quick to judge his storytelling capabilities. He has done a great job capturing the mindset and internal dialogue of a depressed man. The narrator depicts women in an obvious objectified male-gaze, and even reveals tendencies of racism. But such is the behavior of a man who undergoes daily bouts of incessant negativity. I did not like the narrator, and disagreed with everything he said and believed, but in order to truly simulate manic depression, Houellebecq had to delve so deep into pessimism that a glimmer of hope would surely be absurd.
  • (2/5)
    Dit was mijn eerste Houellebecq, tevens een van zijn eerste werken. Uit wat ik eerder al over hem gelezen heb, acht ik de kans niet groot dat hij ooit een van mijn favoriete schrijvers wordt. Cynisme, nihilisme, en cultuurpessimisme zijn over het algemeen niet aan mij besteed. De lectuur van ?De wereld als markt en strijd? riep in die zin vrij snel herinneringen op aan Sartre?s ?La Naus?e? en ook een beetje Camus? ?L?Etranger?, overgoten met de misantropische saus van Celine. Het is alsof Houellebecq die nihilistische meesterwerkjes naar onze tijd verplaatst heeft (nou ja, de jaren ?90). Met zeker 1 groot verschil: de ironische ondertoon. Bij Houellebecq krijg je er bovendien nog een hele maatschappelijke analyse bovenop, over het neoliberalisme en de vermarkting van onze samenleving. Interessant, maar erg eenzijdig, want de klemtoon blijft liggen op de zinloosheid en uitzichtloosheid van het leven. Op het eind verraste de auteur me wel (positief) met de po?tische beschrijving van een intense natuurervaring. Ik ben benieuwd naar zijn volgende werken, maar ik ben nog niet echt onder de indruk van dit kleinood.
  • (2/5)
    This isn't a bad book, it just isn't for me at this time. I really don't need a book that leaves me more depressed than when I began it.
  • (1/5)
    I am done and very glad, that it's over.
    What a bad, bad book.
    The protagonist is a sexist, pretentious prick, whose rambling is above all EXTREMELY BORING.
    I don't see anything remotely good about this book and will not ever again read something by this author.
  • (2/5)
    I have a collection of books I have been picking and choosing from, usually on the basis of, "what sounds good today?" and this was the most recent book I chose.The first thing that has to be said is that I did not really care. I did not care what happened to the protagonist; there was never a point where I connected with him on an intellectual level ("hey, maybe this guy has a point! I can see where he's coming from...") or an emotional level ("I hope things work out for this guy, I really want to see him find a way to resolve his struggle"). Like any criticism leveled at a book, it may say something about the quality of the book or something about the quality of the reader.I can't say that the ideas expressed in the book are totally off. Houellebecq's protagonist isn't the first to cast sex as a kind of economics, not only that but a kind of economics where (at least in a non-monogamous world) there are haves and have-nots. By the end, he has divided the world into Mars (fear, money, power, domination, masculinity) and Venus (sex, seduction) and seems vexed that there is nothing else in the world. I can sympathize, the idea that there is nothing in life except material and sexual hierarchy is very vexing, and when you find it difficult to escape the notion it can become maddening. When sex and resources cease to be cast as matters that enrich you life and instead become the only content of your life, the world seems very small indeed. This is interesting. This is an interesting concept that can be explored and wrestled with.But I still felt no intellectual connection with the protagonist. Maybe I am uncharitable, but I just don't see how two years without sex is cause for someone to lose their minds. If sex drought makes you sob intermittently throughout the day, your psyche probably was not built to last in the first place, and you don't make a very suitable model for a struggle that the modern human faces. I do say that some of his ideas have merit, but I would have to say that his reaction to his struggle smacks of someone trying to give their lives an existential flavor by portraying their petty struggles as existential crises that suck all the joy out of their lives. It worked in The Stranger, because the fact of death reasonably seems like the sort of thing that can suck the color out of life. That is a real struggle that anyone can face in their lives. Lack of sex is a reason to get a faster internet connection, not a reason to try to get your liquored-up friend to go kill people on a beach.Maybe if he had spent some time exploring what it means to live in a world that seems to be dominated by competition for resources and competition for sex - and how to move beyond such a life, I would have been interested. Maybe if he tried to live in defiance of a life. Hell, even if he decided that that was just how life is and decided to go with it, I would have been emotionally invested. But he apparently just decides to start losing control of his mind, and that is rather boring to me.So, he had some interesting ideas that are worth exploring; it just all gets lost in a very boring descent into madness.Oh well, it wasn't too long, no great loss. Whatever....
  • (2/5)
    Not among Houellebecq's best.
  • (3/5)
    Why is it so many of the '1001 books' are stream of consciousness, guilt ridden angst? This is well written ( and translated) and 'about' a depressive, introspective, social isolate, male geek, who finds it hard and/or impossible to relate to other people. He agonises a lot, drinks a lot, thinks about sex, gets depressed, gets treated and gets a bit better.Elegantly written.
  • (3/5)
    From my public library: So its not really mine, but I just gravitate towards this writer's sense of impropriety, so French, yet so naked of culture at the same time.
  • (4/5)
    This is Houellebecq's first novel, short, concise, and covers all his usual themes: sex, philosophy and general disgust at being human. Houellebecq is probably a great writer (or at least an important one), but he isn't a great storyteller - 'Possibilities of An Island' proved that. His limited story telling ability doesn't really matter here though - it's short, basically a series of episodes marking the narrators mental deterioration.If you only want to read one of his novels I'd probably go for Atomised or Platform instead.
  • (5/5)
    I like the Guardian's comment on the back cover: "This book slips down easily like a bad oyster.". And, indeed, I was amused reading the first half. How can this guy be so negative. But at the end, I was dragged down to that mood, and needed some time to recover. Dangerous read. :)
  • (2/5)
    Dit was mijn eerste Houellebecq, tevens een van zijn eerste werken. Uit wat ik eerder al over hem gelezen heb, acht ik de kans niet groot dat hij ooit een van mijn favoriete schrijvers wordt. Cynisme, nihilisme, en cultuurpessimisme zijn over het algemeen niet aan mij besteed. De lectuur van “De wereld als markt en strijd” riep in die zin vrij snel herinneringen op aan Sartre’s “La Nausée” en ook een beetje Camus’ “L’Etranger”, overgoten met de misantropische saus van Celine. Het is alsof Houellebecq die nihilistische meesterwerkjes naar onze tijd verplaatst heeft (nou ja, de jaren ’90). Met zeker 1 groot verschil: de ironische ondertoon. Bij Houellebecq krijg je er bovendien nog een hele maatschappelijke analyse bovenop, over het neoliberalisme en de vermarkting van onze samenleving. Interessant, maar erg eenzijdig, want de klemtoon blijft liggen op de zinloosheid en uitzichtloosheid van het leven. Op het eind verraste de auteur me wel (positief) met de poëtische beschrijving van een intense natuurervaring. Ik ben benieuwd naar zijn volgende werken, maar ik ben nog niet echt onder de indruk van dit kleinood.
  • (3/5)
    Appropriately for the topic of this short novel, I bought it in Geneva among the limited selection of an airport kiosk to kill some time. I hadn't read any Houellebecq prior, though I have seen and not particularly liked the German film interpretation of his The Elementary Particles. The English title of L'Extension du domaine de la lutte, Whatever, misses the original's aggressiveness of the narrator who is both depressed and filled with aggressive misogynistic and xenophobic resentment. A major reason why it took me so long to finish those few pages. The narrator is just a unsavory character whose company one not really seeks. He is decidedly not the enchanting monster type à la Humbert Humbert, Dexter or Grenouille (from The Parfume) but a sad little creep.The book's contemporary Generation X authors such as Douglas Coupland and Nick Hornby treat similar themes in a much lighter and humane way. I am not sure if I want to read another Houellebecq.