Genießen Sie von Millionen von eBooks, Hörbüchern, Zeitschriften und mehr - mit einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $11.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Das Muschelessen
Das Muschelessen
Das Muschelessen
eBook106 Seiten1 Stunde

Das Muschelessen

Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen

3/5

()

Vorschau lesen

Über dieses E-Book

Angespannt wartet die Familie am gedeckten Tisch auf den Vater. Mutter, Tochter und Sohn sitzen vor einem Berg Muscheln, die allein das Oberhaupt der Familie gerne isst. Um die zähe Wartezeit zu überbrücken, beginnen sie miteinander zu reden. Je mehr sich der Vater verspätet, desto offener wird das Gespräch, desto umbarmherziger der Blick auf den autoritären Patriarchen und desto tiefer der Riss, der die scheinbare Familienidylle schließlich zu zerstören droht.
SpracheDeutsch
HerausgeberRotbuch Verlag
Erscheinungsdatum15. Feb. 2013
ISBN9783867895507
Das Muschelessen
Vorschau lesen

Mehr von Birgit Vanderbeke lesen

Ähnlich wie Das Muschelessen

Ähnliche E-Books

Verwandte Kategorien

Rezensionen für Das Muschelessen

Bewertung: 3.0736842105263156 von 5 Sternen
3/5

95 Bewertungen9 Rezensionen

Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?

Zum Bewerten, tippen

Die Rezension muss mindestens 10 Wörter umfassen

  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I don't know what would have happened if we'd been able to eat at six o'clock as usual. It's astonishing how people react when the routine is disturbed, a tiny delay to the normal schedule and at once everything is different.This novella, which was originally published in 1990 and not translated into English until last year, is set in a home in West Berlin prior to the country's reunification. An unnamed woman and her teenaged son and daughter have prepared a feast of moules-frites (mussels with chips) for the head of the household, who promises to bring good news of a promotion to the top level of the company he works for. He does not appear at six o'clock, which is surprising given his usual promptness and rigidity, and instead of eating the sumptuous meal the three of them wait anxiously for his arrival. As time passes and as they become inebriated with drink they speak openly and critically about him, and slowly, in the manner of peeling away the layers of an onion, the man's tyrannical and monstrous behavior towards each of them is revealed. This story of a dysfunctional family is enriched with symbolism, presumably of German society in the 1980s, which includes the gruesome description of the death throes of the mussels as they are boiled alive, and their increasingly distasteful appearance as they sit, uneaten, for hours afterward. The Mussel Feast is a striking and powerful work, and one which undoubtedly would reveal more on subsequent readings.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    That was the longest and most exhilarating paragraph I've ever read.
    The teenage daughter unveils the architecture of her family, warped by her despotic father. She packs in all of the excuses, the hardships, the twisted explanations that decorate the miseries of his rule. It is psychologically astute, uncannily so. It stands on its own for that portrait of the family.
    But then when one considers the author's intention -- "I wrote this book in August 1989, just before the Fall of the Berlin Wall. I wanted to understand how revolutions start. It seemed logical to use the figure of a tyrannical father and turn the story into a German family saga." -- it becomes a fascinating account of the rise and fall of tyrannical regimes. Terrific.
    Loved the ending.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    In this slender novel by German author Birgit Vanderbeke, a son, daughter and their mother wait for the man of the house to return from a business trip. For this reunion dinner, the mother has prepared mussels. As they prepare the mussel feast and then wait for his arrival, they begin to talk to each other. Narrated by the daughter, the book begins by giving a picture of a household that relaxes a bit when the father is out of town, with informal mealtimes and an easier routine, but there are soon ominous hints that life with this man is maybe harsher than is usual. As they wait at the table around the bowl of mussels, the three unhappy family members finally begin to speak honestly with one another and as the hour grows later and later, and it becomes evident that something has happened, the mood grows more convivial as what life is like for them with their father and husband is slowly revealed to be worse and worse. The Mussel Feast reminds me of Herman Koch's The Dinner in its slowly rising level of unpleasantness. It's not over-blown, however, and the narrator is all too reliable. The story is told in one, breathless segment, with few paragraph breaks and enormous run-on sentences. This is a masterful work, with the sense of growing dread perfectly controlled right through the book's final sentences. The Mussel Feast was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, the winner of which will be announced later this month.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Written in Germany in August 1989 , just before the fall of the Berlin Wall, this entriguing monologue is simple in it's telling, but huge in it's comprehension and impact.One evening, a mother and her two teenage children are awaiting the anticipated return from work of the patriach of the family. Everything has been prepared and set out as usual on the dinner table, but tonight they are having mussels. Tonight is to be a celebration. A surefire promotion is expected and they are waiting for him to announce the wonderful "news." Uncharacteristically, of father there is no sign. Why is he late? Why no phone call explaining his delay? As the mussels are cooked and allowed to go cold and a bottle of Spatllese is opened and consumed by all three, the atmosphere subtly changes. Told from the daughter's perspective, the lives of these seemingly ordinary people are pulled apart and, glimpse by glimpse, the reader begins to realise that things are not what they seem. As expected from the wonderful Peirene, a justifiably respected publisher who go from strength to strength in their choice of impeccably translated European fiction, this is another jewel in their crown. This modern German classic by multi award winning Birgit Vanderbeke displays subtle storytelling, which suddenly delivers a virtual punch to the face to the unsuspecting reader, "The Mussel Feast" is a must read and highly recommended.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Supposedly a satire about a family who goes on living under the tyranny of a chauvinistic father - I also suppose it was meant to be as disgusting as the meal they were preparing - but I found the stereotypes totally dull. Maybe they were meant to be that way, but then, satires are not for me. The style reminded me of Thomas Bernhard, who excelled Vanderbeke by far.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    (Fiction, Literary, Translated)A mother and her two teen-aged children have fixed a ‘mess of mussels’ for dinner because it is their husband/father’s favourite meal. They sit at the table, waiting. But he is late.Written in 1989, just before the fall of the Berlin Wall, the father is meant to be an analogy of communism, the ultimate ‘tyrannical father’. Although this has been highly touted, I found it rather ponderous.3½ stars
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    We are in (West) Germany, just before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The father of the family is expected home from a business trip, with news of a long-awaited promotion. His dutiful wife has prepared a celebratory dinner - the mussel feast of the title. It is his favourite dish, but one that his wife, grown-up daughter and teenage son do not particularly like. The father, a slave to his idea of perfection, is uncharacteristically late. As they wait around the table, and the wine flows, the family members finally start to admit to each other that their "perfect household" is not so perfect after all. Narrated by the daughter in a conversational stream-of-consciousness style, this is an increasingly bleak and emotionally painful read, its mood slightly lightened by its irony and wry humour. A brilliant novella which is also a not-so-veiled allegory of the political situation at the time of its writing (1989).
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    It's a very short book — you can easily read it in two or three hours — but quite absorbing. It's written in a sort of Thomas Bernhard looping narrative style, with long run-on sentences and characters who don't have names, but are just identified by their relationship to the narrator ("mein Vater", "meine Mutter", "mein Bruder"). If you could imagine Thomas Bernhard as a teenage girl born in the fifties (scary thought!), this is how he might write. It's a pretty angry book too: probably only "mildly irritated" by Bernhard's demanding standards, but measured on any normal scale there's a serious quantity of anger built in to the narrator's slow dissection of what's wrong with the family she lives in.Given the time and the place, it's fairly clear that we are supposed to read it more broadly than as a simple attack on selfish and abusive fathers/husbands. It's very hard to find stories that can survive the weight of a load of political symbolism shovelled on top of them without either the story or the politics seeming crude and bolted-on, but Vanderbeke handles it very subtly and leaves us to do most of the work. We have to draw our own parallels to what was going on in Germany at the end of the eighties without any direct help from the author, and we're free to ignore the symbolism altogether if we want to. Very nicely done. And more than a slight echo of one or two German fathers I've met...
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    It’s astonishing how people react when the routine is disturbed, a tiny delay to the normal schedule and at once everything is different – and I mean everything: the moment a random event occurs, however insignificant, people who were once stuck together fall apart, all hell breaks loose and they tear each other’s heads off, still alive if possible; terrible violence and slaughter, the fiercest wars ensue because, by pure accident, not everything is normal. - from The Mussel Feast, page 34 -A woman toils over her tub, scrubbing mussels in cold water because it is her husband’s favorite meal even though she does not care for them. As she and her two teenage children – a boy and a girl – sit down with their pot of mussels, they await the father’s return home from work. The time passes and the father does not arrive. As the mussels grow cold in the pot, the reader discovers that all is not what it appears to be within this nuclear family.The unnamed daughter narrates the story of her family where the father takes center stage. Early on she gives clues to the dysfunction which lies below the surface.You see we all had to switch for my father, to become a proper family, as he called it, because he hadn’t had a family, but he had developed the most detailed notions of what a proper family should be like, and he could be extremely sensitive if you undermined these notions. – from The Mussel Feast, page 22 -As the tale unspools, the reader begins to see the unflinching control and brutality of the father who rules his family with an iron fist. The children are not allowed to enjoy the arts, since logic, math and science are all revered instead. The children wonder how many bones they will break if they leap from the window of their home. As the meal progresses, the mother and her children begin to express their true feelings about the father – and they only feel safe doing so in solidarity with each other.The Mussel Feast, translated from the German by Jamie Bulloch, was first penned in August of 1989 – just prior to the fall of the Berlin Wall, and it is the timing of the novella which gives the reader a clue into the symbolism found within its pages. East Germany severely restricted individual freedoms and the Berlin Wall symbolized the loss of freedom to many Germans. In Vanderbeke’s novella, the family has recently left East Germany and now live in the West but the atmosphere in their home continues to be defined by a tyrant who controls everything they do. In his absence, the family begins to recognize the power they may have if they unite against him – part of that is simply having the conversation. At one point, the mussels begin to shift in the pot and in dying, they begin to move, a unified group opening their shells and making noise. The narrator remarks:Can’t you hear anything, I asked. Listen! It’s the mussels, my mother said, and I remember saying, isn’t it awful, I mean I knew that they were still alive, it’s just that I’d never imagined that they would make that rattling noise with their shells. I’d imagined they’d be cooked, eaten, and that was it. And my mother said, they’re opening up and then the entire heap of mussels will start moving. – from The Mussel Feast, page 15 -This is a powerful, darkly comic novella about how revolutions begin and how change unfolds in the face of tyranny. Deftly crafted, the narrative feels circular in nature and subtle plot lines become more obvious as the story unfolds.Good literature is thought-provoking and esoteric in nature. I spent a couple of days thinking about this slim book after I turned the final page and found that I appreciated it more after giving it time to percolate in my mind. Readers who enjoy translated, metaphorical stories anchored in history will find a lot to love about this modern classic.Recommended.

Buchvorschau

Das Muschelessen - Birgit Vanderbeke

Muschelessen

DASS ES AN DIESEM ABEND zum Essen Muscheln geben sollte, war weder ein Zeichen noch ein Zufall, ein wenig ungewöhnlich war es, aber es ist natürlich kein Zeichen gewesen, wie wir hinterher manchmal gesagt haben, es ist ein ungutes Omen gewesen, haben wir hinterher manchmal gesagt, aber das ist es sicherlich nicht gewesen, und auch kein Zufall. Gerade an diesem Tag wollten wir Muscheln essen, ausgerechnet an diesem Abend, haben wir gesagt, aber so ist es wiederum auch nicht gewesen, keinesfalls kann man von Zufall sprechen, wir haben nachträglich nur versucht, dieses Muschelessen als Zeichen oder als Zufall zu nehmen, weil das, was auf dieses ausgefallene Muschelessen dann folgte, tatsächlich von solcher Ungeheuerlichkeit gewesen ist, daß sich am Ende keiner von uns mehr davon erholt hat, und schließlich haben wir immer Muscheln gegessen, wenn es etwas Besonderes sein sollte, und dies ist etwas Besonderes gewesen, allerdings in einem ganz anderen Sinne, als wir uns vorgestellt hatten.

Im Grunde ist das, was wir uns vorgestellt hatten, als wir das Muschelessen geplant hatten, im Verhältnis zu dem, was dann daraus geworden ist, von ziemlich geringfügiger Besonderheit, von einer untergeordneten jedenfalls, während das, was dann geworden ist, von erheblicher, ja, gewaltiger und außerordentlicher Besonderheit ist, aber keinesfalls kann man sagen, es ist ein Zeichen oder ein Zufall gewesen, daß es an dem Abend Muscheln hat geben sollen, was die Lieblingsspeise von meinem Vater gewesen ist, unsere ist es eigentlich nicht gewesen, nur mein Bruder hat Muscheln auch gern gegessen, die Mutter und ich haben uns nicht viel daraus gemacht.

Ich mache mir nicht viel daraus, hat meine Mutter immer gesagt, während sie über die Badewanne gebeugt stand und abwechselnd ein kleines Küchenmesser und die rote Wurzelbürste in der Hand hatte, beide Hände sind knallrot gewesen, weil sie sie beim Muschelputzen unters fließende kalte Wasser gehalten hat, und dann hat sie gründlich kratzen, schrubben, bürsten und mehrfach spülen müssen, weil mein Vater nichts mehr gehaßt hat, als wenn er beim Essen auf Sand in den Muscheln gebissen hat, daß es ihm zwischen den Zähnen geknirscht hat, das hat ihn förmlich gequält.

Ich mache mir eigentlich gar nicht so viel daraus, hat meine Mutter auch an dem Nachmittag gesagt und sich die eiskalten Hände gepustet, aber es ist eben doch etwas Besonderes gewesen, deshalb hat sie die vier Kilo Muscheln am Mittag auch eingekauft und gedacht, daß der Vater, wenn er am Abend von seiner Dienstreise heimkommen würde, seine Freude an einem Muschelessen haben würde, weil er das Kurzgebratene und Gegrillte, die Fleischklumpen, die es auf Dienstreisen gab, meistens satt hatte, und dann hat er sich etwas Anständiges von meiner Mutter bestellt, jedenfalls etwas Hausgemachtes, was es in diesen Tagungshotels nicht gab.

Wenn mein Vater dann heimgekommen ist, hat er von diesen Tagungshotels sowieso die Nase voll gehabt, sie sind komfortabel, aber doch ungemütlich, hat er gesagt, mein Vater ist überhaupt nicht gern auf Dienstreise gefahren, er ist am liebsten bei seiner Familie geblieben, und es ist immer etwas Besonderes gewesen, wenn er hernach wieder heimgekommen ist, traditionell hat es bei uns dann Pellkartoffeln mit Quark und Leinöl gegeben, manchmal auch Erbsensuppe, und mein Vater ist wegen seiner Jugend, in der es das auch gegeben hat statt der kurzgebratenen und gegrillten Fleischklumpen, wehmütig gewesen und hat es sich oft bestellt, aber Muscheln hat er sich eigentlich nie bestellt, weil sie Muscheln immer gemeinsam gemacht haben, mein Vater und meine Mutter, und es ist also von vornherein an diesem Tag eine besondere Ausnahme gewesen, daß meine Mutter allein, beide Hände knallrot unter dem fließenden kalten Wasser, die Muscheln geputzt hat, völlig normal dagegen ist es gewesen, daß sie dabei gesagt hat, ich mache mir nicht viel daraus, was sie immer gesagt hat, wenn meine Eltern zum Muschelputzen im Bad verschwunden sind, sie haben sich abgewechselt mit dem Überdie-Wanne-Beugen, damit sie nicht steif davon würden, und aus dem Badezimmer ist eine gute Stunde lang das Lachen von meinem Vater und ein Quietschen von meiner Mutter herausgeschallt, ganz früher haben sie manchmal »Brüder zur Sonne zur Freiheit« gesungen, was sie drüben gelernt hatten und immer haben singen müssen, »Völker hört die Signale« und all das, meine Mutter mit ihrem Sopran und mein Vater mit seinem Bariton, aber später dann, in der Firmensiedlung, haben sie nicht mehr gesungen.

Wenn sie beide mit hochroten Händen herausgekommen sind, ist ihnen wegen der übermütigen Laune, die sie dort drinnen gehabt hatten, etwas schamig zumute gewesen, aber in der Küche ist das Herumgealbere weitergegangen, und nach und nach haben wir herausbekommen, daß mein Onkel, zu dem sie ihre verspätete Hochzeitsreise gemacht hatten, ein Muschelessen für sie gekocht hatte, was sie nicht gekannt haben, weil es natürlich im Osten keine Miesmuscheln gab, daß das also etwas Fremdartiges für sie gewesen sein muß, und dann haben sie daran auch eine gewisse Anzüglichkeit entdeckt, etwas Frivoles, und immer geschäkert, wenn es Muscheln gab, wegen dieser verspäteten Hochzeitsreise ans Meer ist das Schäkern beim Muschelessen bei uns normal gewesen.

Und zwar bis zu diesem Tag, von dem es von vornherein feststand, daß er ein besonderer, sozusagen historischer Tag würde in der Familiengeschichte, weil die diesmalige Dienstreise meines Vaters der letzte Meilenstein auf dem Weg zur Beförderung gewesen sein sollte, keiner von uns hat daran gezweifelt, daß mein Vater Erfolg haben würde, wochenlang sind wir am Wochenende mucksmäuschenstill gewesen, weil mein Vater den Vortrag geschrieben und eigenhändig mehrfarbige Folien dazu gemalt hat, wir haben immer gesagt, wie schön diese Folien geworden sind, nun, wie findet ihr sie, hat mein Vater gefragt, und wir haben immer wieder gesagt, wie besonders schön wir sie finden, außerdem haben wir alle gewußt, daß mein Vater im Vorträgehalten brillant und stets außergewöhnlich erfolgreich gewesen ist, mein Vater hat bekanntermaßen außergewöhnliche didaktische Fähigkeiten in diesen Vorträgen entwickelt, auf die er sehr stolz gewesen ist, und dann hat er vor Publikum eine gewinnende und einnehmende Art gehabt, einen Charme, das ist zu seiner Kompetenz hinzugekommen, die er auf einem der schwierigsten und heikelsten Gebiete der Naturwissenschaften vorweisen konnte, aber durch diese einnehmende Art vor dem Publikum hat die Kompetenz nicht so streng gewirkt, und die Leute sind regelmäßig begeistert von seinen Vorträgen und meinem Vater im allgemeinen gewesen.

Daß mein Vater an dem Abend so gut wie befördert die Wohnung betreten würde – natürlich noch nicht offiziell, aber man hätte ihm das sofort von oben her signalisiert –, das war der besondere Anlaß, für den meine Mutter, das kleine Küchenmesser und die Wurzelbürste abwechselnd in der knallroten Hand, vier Kilo Muscheln Stück für Stück unter eiskaltes Wasser hielt und kratzte und schrubbte und mehrfach spülte, weil mein Vater es nicht gut leiden konnte, wenn ihm der Sand zwischen den Zähnen knirschte.

Dabei hat sie lustig geschimpft, daß sie sich nicht so viel daraus macht, und über ihr krummes Kreuz gejammert, aber helfen haben wir nicht dürfen, laßt nur, wenn hinterher Sand drin ist, seid jedenfalls ihr nicht schuld, hat meine Mutter gesagt, aber wir haben dafür die Pommes Frites schneiden dürfen, die immer zu Muscheln dazugehören und woraus nun wiederum ich mir nicht viel gemacht habe, obwohl meine Mutter die beste Pommes-Frites-Macherin ist, die ich kenne, mein Bruder mag für sein Leben gerne Pommes Frites, und er hat auch immer gesagt, die sind unübertroffen, einmal hat er sogar alle Freunde, die das bezweifelt und ihn deswegen verspottet haben, zu uns nach Hause eingeladen, was bei uns sonst nicht üblich war, und meine Mutter hat Pommes Frites für sie alle gemacht, sie haben begeistert und überzeugt alles aufgegessen, und mein Bruder ist sehr stolz auf meine Mutter gewesen; seitdem haben wir ihr manchmal schnippeln geholfen, und an dem Abend haben wir also Kartoffeln geschält und in Stäbchen geschnitten, und dabei sind wir allmählich aufgeregt geworden.

Hinterher haben wir gesagt, von da an sind wir unruhig gewesen, von da an haben wir etwas geahnt, man weiß ja hinterher erst, was kam; aber es kann genausogut sein, daß wir nur einfach aufgeregt waren, weil wir gewartet haben, wir sind immer aufgeregt gewesen, wenn wir auf meinen Vater gewartet haben, es ist immer eine Spannung dabei gewesen, im nachhinein übertreibt man vielleicht, vielleicht haben wir nichts geahnt, meinem Bruder zum Beispiel ist nichts davon aufgefallen, während uns beiden anderen mindestens unruhig zumute

Gefällt Ihnen die Vorschau?
Seite 1 von 1