Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Nicht verfügbarAller Tage Abend: Geschichten aus der Nightside 11
Derzeit bei Scribd nicht verfügbar

Aller Tage Abend: Geschichten aus der Nightside 11

Weiter stöbern

Derzeit bei Scribd nicht verfügbar

Aller Tage Abend: Geschichten aus der Nightside 11

Bewertungen:
4/5 (144 Bewertungen)
Länge:
378 Seiten
5 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Feb 22, 2013
ISBN:
9783867621663
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Privatdetektiv John Taylor hat Walker, die frühere Stimme der Autoritäten, getötet und ist nun so etwas wie das inoffizielle Oberhaupt der Nightside. Dann wird ihm per Post das legendäre Schwer Excalibur zugestellt. Um herauszufinden, wie es dazu kam, muss er sich an die letzten Verteidiger Camelots wenden, eine Gruppe von Rittern, die von der Tafelrunde abstammen und an einem Ort leben, der weit furchterregender ist als die Nightside und an dem John aus gutem Grund seit Jahren nicht mehr war: In London ...

Blut fließt rot und golden, als Taylor sich mit König Artus zusammentut und mit Merlin, Elfenadligen, verräterischen Rittern, Söhnen des Teufels, der Dame vom See und verschiedenen Bewohnern der Nightside mit ausgesprochen wohlklingenden Namen aneinandergerät. Da hilft nur eins: John Taylors wohlbekannter, unerschütterlicher Sarkasmus.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Feb 22, 2013
ISBN:
9783867621663
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


Ähnlich wie Aller Tage Abend

Ähnliche Bücher


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Aller Tage Abend denken

4.0
144 Bewertungen / 13 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this one. I love the Arthurian legends. It was great to have King Arthur and John Taylor fighting side by side. I also liked the fairies as well. Great addition to the series.
  • (4/5)
    I love these books because they are a fun, quick read that is full of action and humor. I read them in between heavier books or just when I need a break from the other books I'm reading. In this one, the legendary Excalibur has come to the Nightside in a plain brown postage wrapper straight to John Taylor. It seems it has a "Destiny" for him that he just can't refuse and it includes elf battles and knights in shining armor.

    I felt this was one of the stronger Nightside books. There is a definite formula to these books, and it can get tedious if you read them all back to back. It's not the best book ever, but if you are looking for something light to read this series is a winner.

  • (3/5)
    Another fun adventure in the Nightside (and beyond!) With some heavy Arthurian plot-points!
  • (3/5)
    I had this recommended to me as a story similar to Jim Butcher's Dresden Files, but personally, I found the story somewhat disappointing. The world was fun and imaginative and the concept was engaging, but I couldn't relate to characters and found it simply impossible to suspend enough disbelief to get into the plot.

    John Taylor, from the Nightside, is the hero.
    You can tell.
    He has a magic sword and he wears a white trenchcoat.
    So what if he kills tons of people with no remorse in the first 30 pages and decides to use their bodies to grow fruit trees?
    White duster.
    Magic sword.
    Seriously worthy good guy, clearly.

    Although I was constantly told John and his homicidal honeybun, Susie Shooter, were the good guys, from the first few pages, where he gets hundreds of people murdered in his front yard (he has landmines buried there), I lost my ability to empathize with him. It seems to me that in hunting the monsters, Taylor has become one, writing his own rulebook and enforcing it with blood. This is a book late in the series, after John has apparently undergone character development. Although it's possible he started out with more humanity, I rather doubt it. When Taylor runs into old acquaintances, they pretty universally want to murder him. I can sympathize. My issue with him is not that he is an antihero, but that he seems to to totally lack introspection. Might seems to make right in both the world and the protagonist's moral compass. When the characters show no humanity and let others die without a second thought, why should I care about them?

    Since our good guy murders without compunction, our bad guys have to outdo him by (literally) bathing in blood, decorating their castles with flayed human bodies, running around stark naked with only blood and gore to cover them, threatening to destroy the world for fun, etc. I'm a wimp when it comes to gore, so I found the pages and pages of lovingly detailed descriptions of these atrocities absolutely repulsive and unreadable. Unfortunately, my disgust probably carried over in my evaluation of the characters. I found them unconvincing, from the knight who switches back and forth between fighting for God to making deals with the antichrist to the cheerful baddies who destroy universes for the giggles. I felt the story lacked subtlety and character development and could muster neither sympathy nor curiosity for the fate of the world. Part of the problem came from the ease with which Taylor defeated his opponents. Taylor is a complete badass and who can defeat any opponent without any trouble (although, unfortunately for my psyche, not without a great deal of graphically described mess). No villain lasts more than 30 pages after the first mention of them, and no battle is even particularly tough for him. Taylor takes on (and takes out) a couple of antichrists in the space of thirty pages. His opponents were simply too easy for him to defeat for the story to hold my interest.

    The world itself is quite entertaining and engaging. Basically, the Nightside is Terry Pratchett's Ankh Morpork on steroids. And maybe LSD. It's a mishmash of every sci-fi and fantasy trope out there, thrown together in a crass, crazy, urban maelstrom. The descriptions are fun and relatively creative, and although I'll pass on the "variety bar" where the vampire waiters eat the customers, I would absolutely love a bonsai dinosaur.

    Overall, I think my stomach was simply not strong enough for the series and my tastes were ill-fitted to the story. I felt that John Taylor, rather than being complex and sympathetic, was simply an action hero superman who ran around killing anyone who disagreed with him. Rather than messing around with all that soppy stuff like character development and moral ambiguity, the story tended to focus on bloodbaths, battle, and constant action. Perhaps I simply chose the wrong story in the series to try, but I think that I'll keep my fictional rambles out of the Nightside.
  • (4/5)
    I was consistently distracted and bored to tears with this one. Now don't get me wrong this series is fantastic in an uber sick way. This installment seemed forced yet necessary for the continuing plot. I was fairly amused with the door mouse in this story. I'm happy that his character appeared in the series again.
    I am starting to miss John Taylor taking on alternating partners; instead he's taking Suzy Shooter along for most of his cases. One thing that I certainly was expecting that John was going to take on Walker's position. It seems that it was one of those moments where Karma came back to bite him in the butt.
    Have fun reading!
    Cheers Pretties!
  • (4/5)
    A little deus ex machina at the end, as with all books in this series, but just as bloody and hideously delicious as one could want. Don't read it before bed.
  • (4/5)
    John Taylor is now the Walker. The personal responsable for fixing the Nightsides issues. The problem is he's just been given the sword excalber on top of his other issues and the responsibility of stopping an elf civil war as well as finding King Aurther. A fast fun read.
  • (4/5)
    A good entry for the series. Lots happens. He gets used by Excalibur, he saves the day, but have to watch out for the Spock escape clause.
  • (4/5)
    Welcome back to the Nightside...And we're back to everyone's favorite underside of London, where it's always three in the morning and love is always available -for a price. This time around, though, the stakes are higher and the characters are wilder.At the end of the last novel, The Good, the Bad, and the Uncanny, the Nightside was left without The Authorities, and our favorite private investigator, John Taylor, is left in charge of the Nightside. He's not alone though, along with his girlfriend, bounty hunter Suzie Shotgun, John is armed with Excalibur, the legendary sword of Arthurian myth. To discover the secrets behind the sword, John must track down the Last Defenders of Camelot, a group of Arthurian-style knights that live in London Proper -and hold the answers to what is next for the Nightside.Something of an improvement over the previous novel, Hard Day's Knight takes the Nightside into places readers never would have though possible. Green takes everything readers thought they knew about the Nightside and throws in a handful of unexpected elements that brings together characters and loose plot lines that have been floating around since the beginning.Most importantly, it's incredibly obvious that the end is coming, and the story is gearing up for an epic battle that will decide the fate of the Nightside.And I can't wait.
  • (5/5)
    This is the 11th book in the Nightside series by Green; last I heard there are thirteen books planned for this series. This book picks up just moments where the last left off and plunges us into a wonderful new Nightside mystery that is more epic than the last couple books and more, like novels mid-series.John Taylor and Shotgun Suzie discover that the sword-like package that showed up at the end of book 10 is indeed Excaliber and it is here for a purpose. If only John knew what that purpose was. Now John has to journey out of the Nightside to London Proper to visit the London Knights in hopes that they will have some insight into what the sword's return means.This was another great Nightside novel and it gets up back more to the style of the books mid-way through the series. We are back to a more epic storyline, where John is helping to save the Nightside (and maybe the whole world) from certain destruction. We get a lot of page space with John and Suzie, which was wonderful.The main characters dealt with in this novel focus around the London Knights so they are not as quirky as some of John's sidekicks in previous novels, this is balanced by the fact that Suzie is featured throughout the book. Many events in earlier books are tied in with this book. There is a lot of action and a lot of things going on. I enjoyed the evil alternate Earth with the evil Knights of the Round Table and the inclusion of the Arthurian legend throughout. A lot of events surrounding the Elves are dealt with and the Droods from Green's Secret Histories series are mentioned a few times in passing.I did miss some of my old favorite characters. Razor Eddie never shows, and neither do many of the other big players in the Nightside. They are mentioned in passing, but never given more page space then that.The book ends well and with a rather large surprise. It really makes me look forward to the next book in this series. The plot is engaging and the book moves at a fast paced, those familiar with this series will find it is similar in writing style to previous Nightside books.Overall a very satisfying addition to the series, fans of the Nightside won't be disappointed. I was happy that Green went back to a more epic storyline and that John and Suzie get so much page space. I was a little disappointed that we didn't see more of our other favorite characters, but was happy with how the storyline included a lot of Arthurian legend throughout. There are surprises in this book and I am excited to see what the next Nightside novel brings.
  • (5/5)
    Taking place right after the events of: "The Good, the Bad, and the Uncanny". John Taylor, our white trench-coat private eye finds a wrapped package, reviled to be Excalibur at his apartment. This leads him on a journey from the streets of London, to the hopeless world of Sinister Albion, and back to the Nightside. The story is an edge-on-your-seat thrill-ride with tons of action. The writing has some good lines, as well as whip-smart pacing. John Taylor, as narrator gives some good dialog as well as some dry humor. He also has great chemistry with Suzie Shooter also known as "Oh, Chist it's her, run!" The supporting characters are written well but tend to be flat. As well as one that dose stupid things just to make the story progress. The climax at the end however totally makes up for that as well as a surprise that will make you want read whats next. Another story worthy for the Nightside
  • (5/5)
    The Master of Wit and Sarcasm is back with a lark. A few people have commented that the past few Green books have been repetitive of what came before. And that has been true, though they still have been ghastly fun. This one is BRAND SPANKING NEW! The plot was set up at the end of the previous book "The Good, The Bad, The Uncanny" with the arrival of a package at John Taylor's residence that could only be Excalibur.A few old friends turn up in this book, Suzzie Shooter, Alex Morrisey, and Julian Advent. Though thats about it. A lot of names are dropped, from the Nightside, but also the Droods are mentioned many times, The Waking Beauty (from Drinking Midnight Wine) [not a plot point] was mentioned as being the Mother of Merlin's children, and a certain 1-eyed scoundrel and female (Hawk & Fisher) were unnamed but in Strangefellows.Through out this book, John has to go back into real London to find the descendants of the Knights of the Round Table, deal with King Artur and his Merlin from Sinister Albion, and stop the Elves from still going to war and using Earth as their battlefield. All this seems like a lot for even the great John Taylor. But he does get some help from an unexpected KING OF ENGLAND returned from his resting place.Mr. Green really has constructed a novel that is new and fresh, considering everything he has written before. He does not use any of his old lines. A few of them I do miss. John is totally put through his paces and can't always use his gift or his normal tricks in this book and has to think for him self. And the humor is just wonderful. I had to put the book down a few times because i was laughing so hard. If you are looking for a new book or new series this is for you. If you want something macabre and deviously funny this is for you. It is dark but there is always a human element to it. And there is something redeeming about our heroes even when the have to kill a bunch of people. I think there is only one more Nightside book coming out after this one. I could be wrong but I think Mr. Green has said he is winding it down. As this is book 11 of a fun series I can totally understand that. If you have missed the past few books pick this one up. You won't be disappointed or my name isn't Corey. If you are disappointed then my name is John Taylor and you can find me in the Nightside!
  • (5/5)
    “Hello, London Knights. I’m John Taylor. From the Nightside. I need to talk to you concerning something that’s a lot more in your line of work than mine. If it helps, Julien Advent vouches for me. If it doesn’t, I never met the man. Look, this really is something you want to know about. It’s Arthurian as all hell, and the words deep shit and approaching fan should be taken into consideration.” Still nothing. Arrogant bunch of pricks. I was considering the soothing properties of giving the wall another good hard kick when, almost without realising it, my hand rose and took a firm hold on the invisible hilt rising behind my shoulder. And the moment my bare flesh made contact with the ancient bone ... old, old words came to me. “I bear Excalibur, the Sword of Morning, the Hand of Albion. In the name of the Lady who has granted me her power, and in the name of the man who last wielded it, the once-and-future King, I demand audience with the last defenders of Camelot.” After a suspiciously sword-shaped parcel is delivered to his house, somehow bypassing the extremely thorough (not to say lethal) security system, John Taylor finds himself in possession of Excalibur, much to his surprise. As Merlin's death means that there is no-one left in the Nightside who can tell him what he is supposed to do with it, and Julien Advent suggests that he should leave the Nightside and go to London Proper to seek the advice of the London Knights, the spiritual descendents of the Knights of the Round Table. , where he meets someone he last met when he time-travelled 1500 years into the past in search of the origins of the Nightside. John Taylor and Suzie Shooter find themselves in the midst of an Arthurian adventure featuring Excalibur, Knights in armour, a civil war between the elves of two rival Unseelie Courts and the Merlin Satanspawn from a parallel world known as Sinister Albion, who has made his world a hell on Earth and intends to do the same to the Nightside. I liked the story a lot and would say that this is one of the most exciting books in the series.