Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Nicht verfügbarGrabesruh: Die dunklen Fälle des Harry Dresden 3
Derzeit bei Scribd nicht verfügbar

Grabesruh: Die dunklen Fälle des Harry Dresden 3

Weiter stöbern

Derzeit bei Scribd nicht verfügbar

Grabesruh: Die dunklen Fälle des Harry Dresden 3

Bewertungen:
3/5 (2,375 Bewertungen)
Länge:
502 Seiten
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 3, 2012
ISBN:
9783867621236
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Wo die Polizei nicht weiterweiß, kommt er ins Spiel: Harry Dresden, der Privatdetektiv mit den besonderen Fähigkeiten. Er musste es schon mit einer ganzen Reihe unheimlicher Gegner aufnehmen - von skrupellosen Vampiren und düsteren Dämonen bis zu gigantischen Skorpionen. Doch nichts von alldem hat ihn auf die Gefahr vorbereitet, der er sich nun stellen muss: Überall in Chicago werden Menschen von Geistern attackiert, die nur ein Ziel kennen - Rache an allen Lebenden. Kann Harry sie aufhalten?
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 3, 2012
ISBN:
9783867621236
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


Ähnlich wie Grabesruh

Ähnliche Bücher


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Grabesruh denken

3.0
2375 Bewertungen / 145 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    This book gets a bit more fantastical than the first two, taking the focus away from real-world Chicago in order to reveal more of the supernatural elements of Harry's world. To that end, I was relatively disappointed. Still good, but I miss the real-life grounding of the first books.
  • (3/5)
    I really, really, really want to like this book more and rate it higher, but I just can't.

    I love that Jim Butcher has made urban fantasy interesting. There are different kinds of vampires with different councils and different motivations and backgrounds. There are different kinds of werewolves. There are different kinds of spirits. It's interesting and complex, and I love that.

    Harry is a decent character. Oh sure, he's over the top, has some sort of savior complex and is a chauvinist pig and I get that. I do get a wee bit tired that every. single. time. there's something going on, Harry is always on his last legs, with the last bit of power, barely able to hold on and figures things out at the last minute and scrapes through his battles in the end. He's always exhausted, weakened, etc. but I can accept that.

    I can accept that most the characters are also bigger than life/over the top, because it's a fantasy story, and a pretty decent/action packed one, and the characters are fine for that.

    What I get very tired of, and why I can't rate this book more stars, is Harry talking about every female character as a sex object first. When you first see any character, even long established ones, he has to talk about how a blouse cups a breast or how legs look or how many curves a girl has (and where) or how cute or sexy (or not) a woman is. It's tiring. It's cheap, and it's one of the reasons why I tend to shy away from male writers.

    Jim Butcher, you're better than that. I appreciate that you've gone as far as making women other than damsels in distress - bravo, but seriously, I hope you lay off the sexualizing of every woman, cheapening them all into sex-objects first, characters later. I can live with once in a while, but I get tired of it every time there's a female on deck. It's demeaning, please stop.

    Grave Peril has much better pacing (my complaint regarding the second book), and the society and spooks are interesting and pretty complex. This book is fairly dark, and Harry is pretty much a punching bag. The presence of Michael, a character that shows up full blown with no backstory to explain him at first is a little jarring, but Butcher did get around to fleshing out enough of what's going on with Michael that I'm not as thrown off by his larger than life sudden presence as I was at the beginning of the book. It's not a bad book overall, and it could be a great book, but the writing regarding women is starting to leave a bad taste in my mouth.
  • (3/5)
    I will keep reading these until I run out of them. Dresden may be a little bit of a do-gooder, but you can't help but like the guy. And God help you if you piss him off.
  • (4/5)
    So much better than the first two! I'm glad I gave this one a chance.
  • (5/5)
    This is my favorite of the series thus far! Harry is in a real fix this time as the threshold between the realms is being manipulated by some unknown demon or evil force. All kinds of baddies are coming through, one of which is so powerful that Harry begins to question his ability to take it on. Meanwhile his relationship with Susan is better than ever, adding a nice dose of sweetness between all the chaos and action.

    Right away we are introduced to Michael, a/k/a "The First of God" and Harry's battle partner. The two of them were a great ghost/demon/vampire fighting team and I really enjoyed the easy banter between them. The witty humor was top notch and made devouring this book all the more enjoyable. We also learn a little more about Harry's past and meet Lea...his fairy godmother. Right away we learn things aren't all warm and fuzzy between them.

    The series can really take flight at this point and I'm excited about reading the next book. These books are so hard to put down and once again I devoured this one in almost one setting. It's going on my All Time Favorites shelf!

    Second Read: Finished 9/2/15
  • (4/5)
    This series is fantastic!
  • (4/5)
    Book three of the Dresden files finds Harry with a new/old partner, new to us but one that has apparently been with him for a while. Michael in a very interesting character in that although he is on a mission from God, he still tolerates Harry's un-church sanctioned wizardry to pursue the better good. We also got to meet Harry's Godmother, who was rather surprising. Murphy didn't have as much page time in this one, which I kind of missed. In this story Harry goes up against a nasty demon and a number of really nasty vampires (and even meets one not so nasty one) The only down side to this fast moving mystery/adventure is that I do get a little tired of reading about Harry getting the stuffing beat out of him every couple pages. However, this isn't enough for me to miss out on reading the next story. I'm looking forward to it.
  • (5/5)
    "Wow," Bob said. "You're dying. What a great plan."Bob always knows how to put things.Still loving Harry Dresden. The third installment offers a broader picture of Harry Dresden's world, and like before, he starts playing with the line between good and bad magic.Jim Butcher is teaching me a lot about writing, about story, and storytelling. How to continue to make things worse for your character. Don't just put a time limit on him saving everyone. Make him take poison that puts a time limit on his life-saving! How to unfold backstory: in dribs and drabs. He mentions the Nevernever nearly immediately in the first book. But I don't think he ever outright explains it. Harry will mention, say, Faeries, and Bob will elaborate: "Either we get the Disney version of Faerie, with elves and tinkerbell pixies and who knows what sugary cuteness, or we get the wicked witch version, which is considerably more entertaining, but less healthy." He drops bits of information only when we need them. And sometimes even then we have to wait. It makes for a smoothly flowing story that seems to unfold effortlessly and keeps you turning the pages.I like the character of Michael, though I don't know exactly what he is. I don't know if we'll see him again, but I hope so.And Harry continues to make mistakes and pay the price for them. He loses people. He makes enemies. He starts wars. And he doesn't even get paid.And I love him even more for it.
  • (3/5)
    The ghosts are getting all riled up, with the help of an old friend, Michael (who happens to be a knight, or as Harry calls him a “Fist of God”) Harry is sending them back to the NeverNever, entering the NeverNever to chase one ghost killing babies they discover she has been tortured. We also meet Harry’s godmother, a Faerie of considerable that Harry entered into a bargain with, as he tries to find out who is torturing ghosts, then his friends, Harry realizes that he is the real target, then the Vampires get involved. Things go from bad to worse.We met Bianca, a vampire big-wig, in the first book. She makes an appearance in this book, and I’m trying to not give anything away, but the following may be a potential spoiler, there are 3 courts of vampires, Red, Black and White. We meet a sort of friendly vampire, and all these people are aligned to make things bad for Harry.He finds out who is tormenting the ghosts and ends up banishing him, that is not the end of his troubles but it certainly helps. He has new troubles though, this sets the stage for the next book.While I find these books to be enjoyable and quick reads, they are just that, a little addictive at first but I am also finding them to be a little repetitive. I have been told they get better with book 5 so I am hanging in there.
  • (3/5)
    Not nearly as good as the first two, but still enjoyable. I look forward to reading more. I'm not sure why this one seemed so slow to me. It really didn't grab my interest until it was almost over.
  • (4/5)
    Overall, a good mystery. Parts were quite spooky. Recommend.
  • (4/5)
    Third one down. Like predicted they are getting better. And more intense. Enough said, I've got the next book in my lap and I can't wait a second more.
  • (3/5)


    This one is really quite a bit better than the first two. Same character and set up, a wizard in modern Chicago working as a supernatural PI. He gets involved with the church, a paladin named Michael, a ghost and a bunch of vampires. The plot was well structured in that a critical set of scenes are only told of after the fact as the story moves forward. It worked well. After two, I was going to give up on this series. But this is promising, I think I'll go along a little further.
  • (3/5)
    Grave Peril
    3 Stars

    Many have stated that Grave Peril is the turning point in the series for the better. After considering the plot and the characters, I must confess that I found Fool Moon to be far more entertaining.

    Don't get me wrong. Harry and his quirks are very endearing but a number of issues irritated me in this installment. First, Murphy barely makes an appearance and the absence of a strong willed, take no prisoners, female character detracts from the overall effect of the story.

    Second, the criticism surrounding Harry's chauvinism finally makes sense. In the first two books, his attitude toward women comes across as gallant and even chivalrous, but the chauvinism is front and center in this one as Harry fixates on the breasts and luscious curves of virtually every female character - is this really necessary?

    Third, while the basic plot is compelling and the action scenes exciting, the execution is repetitive. How many times must Harry battle the Nightmare before he defeats it? How many times must he get round the machinations of his fairy Godmother? How many times must he be exposed to the lustful effects of vampire venom? How many times must his powers fail him precisely when he needs them the most? Come on already, get some new material.

    Finally, Harry constantly blames himself for the choices others make that get them into trouble. While this overdeveloped sense of guilt may have its place in the portrayal of Harry's internal struggle with his own conscience, it starts to grate on the nerves after a while.

    On a more positive note, the secondary characters both old and new are very engaging. Michael, a Knight of the Cross, constitutes an intriguing counterpoint to Harry's irreligious personality, and the manner in which Butcher depicts the power of Christian artifacts adds another layer of complexity to the world building. That said, Michael is a little too self-righteous and condescending for my tastes.

    There are also some poignant moments between Harry and his reporter girlfriend, Susan Rodriguez, although her misguided Lois Lane routine is getting old and she has never really appealed to me as Harry's love interest.

    The most interesting characters, however, are Lea, Harry's rather scary fairy Godmother, who serves as a cautionary tale about what happens when one makes ill advised bargains with the fae, and Thomas, the morally ambiguous vampire who plays a pivotal role in Harry's conflict with the various villains in the story.

    All in all, the world building is strong, the story has potential and the unanswered questions are interesting enough to keep on with the series.
  • (4/5)
    “I'm rolling thunder, pouring rain, I'm coming on like a hurricane…”AC/DC- Hell’s Bells Grab your staff and sword! Our favorite Chicago wizard/private detective returns for his 3rd outing. Here, he is assisted by his faithful friend Michael, a Knight of the Cross and they battle various demons and vampires. Plenty of thrills and action, (maybe to much for me), but if this is your cup of tea, it will go down perfectly. Butcher’s writing has really improved here and that is an added bonus. “Hell’s Bells” is Harry’s favorite utterance.
  • (5/5)
    we meet Michael for the first time in Grave Peril. or, officially for the first time. he's in some short stories that technically come before, but for the series, this is the first. Michael is a Fist of God, one of the knights who wields a sword made of the nails from the crucification. I love his sense of humor and the "coincidences" that happen so he can fulfill his duties.
    in grave peril michael and harry are chasing all over the city trying to lay ghosts to rest before they kill innocents. but, of course, things aren't what they seem, and what seems to be a moderately not super ridiculously difficult undertaking spins out of control.
  • (4/5)
    Harry's really gotten himself into a pickle this time. There's not much of Murphy and the cops in this one, but he manages to get himself into enough trouble anyway. And when it's all said and done, it's really just beginning -- I think this book really marks a gear change in the series.
  • (4/5)
    This one was absolutely a wild ride. The tension was up right from the start and so was the action and it never let go. We also got to see a few new characters that I found very interesting and I hope we see more of. The mystery of what was happening and why was thrilling from start to finish and there were definitely more than a few twists that I didn't see coming in the plot. I'm not sure you could call that ending happy, but it was hopeful and absolutely fitting and it definitely sets up the next big problem pretty well. I can't wait to start reading the next book in the series. The only problem I had with it was that this is just the third book in the series and already the second book so far where Harry has been at least partially, if not fully, de-powered for a portion of the book and I'm already starting to get bored with that.
  • (3/5)
    Unlike Fool Moon, I spent most of this book enjoying myself but still felt the conclusion to be one fight too many. I am hoping that the rest of the series continues to improve.
  • (5/5)
    AWESOME... CANT WAIT FOR THE NEXT BOOK TO READ....
  • (1/5)
    Why I won't be reading any more Dresden:
    The vampire's brother, Kyle, as blonde and pretty as she had been a moment before, landed in the space I had occupied. He too dropped to his knees with a drooling hiss, fangs showing, eyes bulging. He wore a white cat suit, clinging tight to his curves, along with white boots and gloves, and a short white cape with a deep hood. His clothing was smudged, imperfect, spotted with flecks of scarlet, and his blonde hair in disarray. Blood stained his mouth, like smeared lipstick, or a child with a big cup of juice. A blood mustache. Hells bells.

    I kept my blasting rod trained on Kyle, my left hand thrust out before me. "So you two are putting the snatch on Lydia, eh? Why?"

    "Let me kill him," moaned the male, his eyes all black, empty and hungry. "Kelly. I'm hungry."

    So sue me, I weird out when someone starts talking about eating me. I swung the blasting rod right at Kyle's face and started sending power into it, setting the tip to glowing. "Yeah, Kelly," I said. "Let him try."

    Kelly rippled, beneath her skin, and it was enough to make my stomach turn. Something like that just ain't right, even when you know what's underneath. "This affair is none of yours, wizard."

    "The girl is under my protection," I said. "You two clear out, now, and I won't have to get rough with you."

    "That will not happen," Kelly said, her voice deadly quiet.

    "Kelly," the male moaned again. More drool slithered out of his mouth, dripping to the floor. He started shaking, quivering, as if he were about to fly apart. Or at me. [...]

    He flung himself atop me, straddling my hips with his thighs, moaning in excitement. I thrust the blasting rod toward him, but he batted it aside, laughing in a wild, hysterical tone, throwing his smouldering cloak off with the other hand. He plunged toward my throat, but I lifted my hands to catch at his mane of hair. I knew it was a futile gesture - he was just too damned strong. I wouldn't be able to hold him off of me for long, a few seconds at most. My heart pounded in my burning chest, and I struggled, gasping in air.

    And then droplets of his spittle fell onto my throat, my cheek, into my mouth. And none of it mattered anymore.

    It was a glorious sensation, that spread over me - warmth, security, peace. Ecstasy began at my skin and spread through me, easing all the horrid tension from my muscles. My fingers slackened in Kyle's lovely hair, and he purred, his hips writhing against mine. He lowered his mouth toward me, and I felt his breath on my skin, his chest press against me through the thin material of his bodysuit.

    Something, some nagging thought, bothered me for a moment. Perhaps it was something about the perfect, lightless depths of his eyes, or the way his fangs rubbed against my throat - no matter how good it felt. But then I felt his lips on my skin, felt him draw in his breath in shivering anticipation, and it stopped mattering. I just wanted more.

    Haha, I wish! I just reassigned roles here for funsies, of course it's Kelly who's doing all the writhing and uncontrolled drooling, silly little me. I might have been able to finish the book if it had been my version, but yeah - I'm done with this shit.

    Oh, and by the way: I even gave the book more chances and 50 pages later learned this about his godmother, who "purrs" the first thing she says in that scene:
    Her golden cat-eyes studied me with their old, familiar warmth, her hair spilling around her in a mane that seemed unaffected by the rain. She didn't seem to mind it soaking her dress, though. It clung to the curves of her body, showed the perfection of her breasts, their tips clearly showing through the silken fabric as she knelt beside me.
    And this about Bianca another 50 pages later, who - surprisingly! - "purrs" the first thing she says in that scene:

    Bianca wasn't tall, but she was statuesque in a way you only find in erotic magazines and embarrassing dreams. Pale of skin, dark of hair and eye, full of sensuous curves, from her mouth to her hips, everything possessed of luscious ripeness coupled with slender strength that would have caught the eye of any man. She wore a gown of flickering flame. I don't mean that she wore a red dress - she wore flame, gathered about her in the shape of an evening gown, blue at its base fading through the colors of a candle to red as it cupped her full, gorgeous breasts.

    Most surprising is the fact that I finally gave up on the book only after Harry lets himself get poisoned by drinking wine served to him at his sworn enemy's party, dressep up in a ridiculous costume designed to enrage his deadly enemies even more. That's not gumption, it just makes Harry look like a mouthbreathing idiot who thinks he's funny, and I'm sick of this series.
  • (4/5)
    A very entertaining combination of detective fiction and fantasy/horror which shouldn't come off but does, not least because of the author's wry humour and knack for making us care about his protagonists. I came to this book part way through the series but found that it made a good introduction.
  • (4/5)
    Die Handlung von Grave Peril (Grabesruh) beginnt zunächst vielversprechend. Geister erheben sich aus ihren Gräbern, treiben in der Stadt ihr Unwesen, gefährden das Leben der Menschen und keiner kann sich ihr ungewöhnliches Auftauchen und ihr bedrohliches Verhalten erklären. Harry Dresden findet schließlich heraus, dass die Geister wie Marionetten von jemandem kontrolliert werden, und damit beginnt der Abstieg dieses interessanten Auftakts. Denn gerade als man denkt, es wird nun richtig geisterhaft, vielleicht ein bisschen gruselig, aber auf jeden Fall spannend, flaut die Story merklich ab und die Erzählung tropft eine Zeit lang zäh vor sich hin. Die Handlung selbst entwickelt sich außerdem plötzlich in eine gänzlich andere und nicht recht nachvollziehbare Richtung.Inhaltlich ist es ab und an schwer, den vielen verschiedenen Ansätzen des Autors zu folgen. Er hat sich in Grave Peril viel vorgenommen – zu viel. Besonders Verweise auf vergangene Ereignisse, die für den Leser nicht stattgefunden haben und lediglich im vorliegenden Band als Tatsachen präsentiert werden, lassen einen immer wieder im Lesefluss stolpern. Man fragt sich unweigerlich, ob einem in den beiden Vorgängerbänden etwas entgangen ist oder ob man sich gar vergriffen hat und statt Band drei vielleicht Band vier oder fünf in Händen hält. Vieles, was in Grave Peril als gegeben angesehen wird, kommt für den Leser völlig unvorhersehbar und ohne erklärende Herleitung. Es gibt unzählige verschiedene Handlungsstränge, die in diesem Roman aufgebaut werden und zwar einiges an Material für kommende Bücher liefern und einem den Mund wässrig machen, in ihrem geballten Auftreten aber zu viel für die Möglichkeiten eines einzigen Bandes sind. Bis zur Buchhälfte bleibt dementsprechend vieles sprunghaft; die Fülle an neuen Informationen verhindert eine Entwicklung der Handlung und erschwert es, das Buch genießen zu können.Die zweite Buchhälfte dagegen nimmt schließlich doch noch Fahrt auf und konzentriert sich etwas mehr auf den eigentlichen Plot von Grave Peril, auch wenn die Story nicht mehr ganz so ansprechend ist, wie sie eingangs zu werden versprach.Die Charaktere sind solide und gut gezeichnet wie auch in den beiden Vorgängern schon, vermögen aber in der Interaktion gelegentlich ebenfalls zu verwirren. Es werden außerdem verschiedene neue Charaktere eingeführt die bisher unerwähnt geblieben sind und sich nun etwas zu schnell in das bisher bekannte Bild einfügen, während Murphys Charakter in Grave Peril kaum auftaucht und eher zu Randfigur degradiert wird.Zusammengefasst lässt sich also sagen, dass Grave Peril im Vergleich zu seinen Vorgängern einige Schwächen aufweist und die Handlung stellenweise stark konstruiert und erzwungen wirkt. Trotzdem macht das Buch unter dem Strich Lust auf weitere Bände, in denen die vielen nebensächlich angedeuteten Handlungsstränge hoffentlich weiter ausgebaut werden und das etwas tragische Ende vielleicht nur der Anfang von etwas Größerem ist.
  • (5/5)
    *Book source ~ Purchased from AudibleHarry teams up with Michael Carpenter, a Knight of the Cross, when the ghost world starts going haywire. Something is stirring up the spirit world and Harry is determined to figure it out and put it to rights, if at all possible. Because nothing is worse than spirits gone wild.Guest reviewers:A ~ my 16-year-old daughterT ~ my 14-year-old sonK ~ my 13-year-old sonWe meet some new characters in this book, ones the kids hope will continue on in the series. Everyone loves Michael and his sword Amoracchius. Actually, I think they just like any swords, but Amoracchius does have special abilities since it has a nail from the crucifix in its handle and not just any Tom, Dick or Harry can wield Amoracchius. Thomas, a vampire of the White Court, is also turning out to be a cautious favorite. The kids do not like Harry’s faerie Godmother, Leanansidhe, who is a Sidhe of the Winter Court. T said she is a ‘B’ meaning bitch which I can say and he is not allowed until he’s older. Father Forthill is another favorite. A thought the Nightmare was a very interesting character and the barbwire spell was pretty cool if nasty. T & K thought the Nightmare was a badass baddie.The plot was twisty enough to keep them interested in the proceedings and the description of the Nevernever wasn’t quite what they expected. A said she thought it would be more like the Nether (from the game Minecraft), but overall it was pretty cool.Favorite part: When Harry goes to the Bianca’s Vampire Masquerade Ball dressed as a vampire including fake fangs. 2nd favorite: When Harry encounters the Nightmare in his dreams.Favorite quote: “Holy shit," I breathed. "Hellhounds.""Harry," Michael said sternly. "You know I hate it when you swear.""You're right. Sorry. Holy shit," I breathed, "heckhounds.” Bring on Summer Knight!
  • (3/5)
    I'm either getting used to his writing for sake of the story and characters, or the writing is better.
  • (4/5)
    Harry's under siege, the vamps, faeries, and the undead are threatening Chicago and only Harry can stop them. But in doing so he loses whats most precious to him.
  • (4/5)
    Yet another winning book in the Dresden Files series by Mr Butcher. I love his writing style and the humour he spreads through each story. This book was a shocker in many ways, some of what was done with the characters, the magic and the results of this story's events.The only thing I really don't like is how each of his books have numerous incorrect words (typos) and spelling errors that the publisher at Penguin Books missed. These a pretty glaring errors so that is getting me pretty ticked off with the publishing company. Maybe Mr. Butcher can have a word with them?? I have luckily borrowed them off a friend, but I would be taking these books back to the store with these errors if I was buying them. They're not acceptable as they're all through the book and each book in the series seems to have more that's missed. So Mr. Butcher, if you're reading this review, talk to your publisher because this is cheesing off your readers!!Other than that I rate this another 4/5 stars. Great writing, keep it up!! :)
  • (3/5)
    Not really liked it. A deus ex machina action which never worked for me. Dresden seems to just raise one hand and the Vampires are dead. The magic system is too 'harry potterish' type, where you just have to raise a wand or an arm and power flow will kill the antagonist.Though it still was readable i was not impressed with the story.
  • (5/5)
    The Third in the Dresden Files. I really enjoyed this read, Harry & sword wielding very Christian friend Michael, take on Bianca & the Vampires. Along the way he faces ghosts, demons and faeries & his faerie Godmother Lea. Quite a page turner.
  • (4/5)
    This third book in the Dresden Files series struck me as erroring more on the side of urban fantasy than detective novel: Harry Dresden, the only wizard in the Chicago yellow pages, is on the case before the book begins. In fact, unlike the first two in the series, this book starts in medias res. It quickly backtracks and then catches up with itself again, however at the point to which the narrative jumps back Dresden is still already investigating the strange increase in ghost activity. As a consequence, the pacing feels much faster than in the earlier novels.This book also gets points for illustrating well the balanced perspective on religion in the Dresden Files universe. Harry doesn't understand God, and feels a bit nervous about the Catholic church due to its history of burning wizards. However, not only do good Christian characters appear, but one of them, Michael, is a sort of paladin Knight with God at his back. More than any other fantasy novel that I have encountered, Dresden's universe seems to play by the rules of the real world when it comes to having good and bad in any religion, and on top of that the Powers-that-be behind each religion or belief system appear to be equally existant and capable of supplying magic.