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Sturmnacht: Die dunklen Fälle des Harry Dresden 1

Sturmnacht: Die dunklen Fälle des Harry Dresden 1

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Sturmnacht: Die dunklen Fälle des Harry Dresden 1

Bewertungen:
3/5 (4,149 Bewertungen)
Länge:
362 Seiten
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 3, 2012
ISBN:
9783867621212
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Immer häufiger wird die Polizei von Chicago mit bizarren Morden konfrontiert. Wenn man mit modernsten Ermittlungsmethoden nicht weiter kommt, gibt es nur einen, der helfen kann: Harry Dresden, Profiler der besonderen Art. Er verfügt über einen ausgezeichneten Spürsinn - und ungewöhnliche Fähigkeiten. Doch wer in der Lage ist, die Dunkelheit hinter unserer Realität zu sehen, lebt gefährlich! Harrys neuer Fall: Ein Liebespaar wird tot aufgefunden. Nackt. Im Bett. Buchstäblich zerrissen, als hätte ein Blitz zugeschlagen. Doch kann so etwas möglich sein? Harry beginnt zu ermitteln - und hat es bald nicht nur mit der Polizei und einem skrupellosen Drogenboss zu tun, sondern auch mit blutdurstigen Dämonen ...
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 3, 2012
ISBN:
9783867621212
Format:
Buch

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3.0
4149 Bewertungen / 296 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (2/5)
    Tepid is the best way to describe my feelings after finishing this book. It wasn't bad. It wasn't all that good either.

    Harry Dresden comes off as an homage (or rip off) of classic noir detectives rather than following in his footsteps. There's the bad taste of wish fulfillment in the fact that he's grumpy and unkempt while still being chivalrous and romantic at heart.

    As for his actually detective skills... they are more than a little lacking. He never actually makes a break in his own case. Instead he relies on the "wait-and-see" method where he reacts to a situation, broods for a while and then has someone tell him everything he needs to know in one big data dump.

    As an homage it's thin but passable. As an original story it leaves me wanting a better detective and details about the magic world Harry only hints at as part of his past. There might be a great, entertaining story in the world that Harry Dresden lives in but this certainly isn't it.
  • (4/5)
    The Dresden Files Book #1...

    Harry Dresden- the wizard with many tricks up his sleeve and weapons at his disposal-some magical & some not. He wears sweatpants, cowboy boots, old ratty t-shirts & tops it off with his infamous duster. He works with the police on occasion solving cases of a supernatural nature. He may not sound like much but he's a pretty cool character. In this first book, Storm Front, we learned a little bit about his background and got a taste of his magical abilities while he was on the hunt for someone using dark magic for nefarious purposes...

    While I'm definitely not a fan of the sweatpants & cowboy boots, I am a fan of Harry Dresden now. I really enjoyed the mix of magic & mystery together and I thought his magical abilities were pretty neat & creative. The series reminded me of a more adult version of The Last Apprentice series by Joseph Delaney so if you liked that one, you'll probably like this one too. I listened to the audio book (sped up to 1.3 as always) and I really liked the narrator a lot so I'm definitely going to continue the series -in audio. I'm looking forward to seeing what else Harry can do.

    *I read this for my 2016 Halloween Bingo: ~Supernatural~ square

  • (3/5)
    [Cross-posted to Knite Writes]Lots of thoughts on this one. One, it’s the most fun I’ve had reading in a very long time. Jim Butcher has the perfect blend of comedy, drama, and action. There’s a comedic lightness to the story that balances out what could very easily morph into a morbid urban fantasy tale about a doomed wizard whose life pretty much sucks because he tries to be the good guy.Two, Butcher brings a great host of interesting characters to life, and most of them aren’t even magical. I love a good urban fantasy that incorporates a few badass normals into the plot line. I have a tendency to roll my eyes at urban fantasy stories that ignore the non-magical and pretend they’re entirely ineffectual in the grand scheme of the world despite being the majority.Three, his world-building is fantastic. We learn just enough to keep us chugging smoothly through the plot, and there’s a few generous hints at Harry’s backstory and current status in the magical world that are woven cleanly into the current plot line. No humongous fantasy info-dumps. No long-winded backstory flashbacks. The book has a moderate to fast pace and doesn’t really lose steam at any point in time.Four — and here’s where I get to the negative — Butcher portrays Dresden as a huge sexist. Now, I don’t necessarily have a problem with a sexist character. He’s a character. And like people in real life, he has his biases and prejudices and misguided beliefs in stereotypes. That’s how people are, and the traits of people are taken and molded into representations of people within fiction. No problem whatsoever with a sexist character. Seen them in plenty of books. See them all the time. Butcher even goes out of his way to make sure that Harry gets criticized for the flaw, which means that Harry’s design was purely intentional. And that’s a lot more than I can say for many authors, some of whom appear to unintentionally write blatant sexism into their stories.So, no, I don’t have a problem with the “sexist hero” concept, especially the “sexist hero who always get berated for his sexism” concept. What I have a problem with is that the story is told in the first person, so I have to sit there and listen to Harry go on and on and on and on and on about boobs and butts and the other many “fine features” that women tend to possess. Now, don’t get me wrong, descriptions of men finding aspects of women attractive aren’t necessarily a detriment in and of themselves. In fact, such descriptions and their opposite sex counterparts make up a hefty amount of sexual and romantic descriptions in many, many books.My real problem is that Harry has an awful tendency to describe said “fine features” at the most distracting and inappropriate times. To the point where it started to grate on my nerves. Once I was able to pick up the cues of an upcoming “woman spiel,” I would very consciously skip over it to get back to the story. I know what women look like; you don’t need to tell me everything. Just says she’s pretty, hot, sexy, good-looking, gifted, busty, physically blessed, whatever and get on with it. Save the sensual, steamy descriptions for the bedroom scenes and get back to the butt kicking and spell casting.Anyway, that’s my annoyed rant for the day.Besides that, Storm Front was great.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not sure why, but recently I've seen Jim Butcher mentioned quite frequently and have had his books recommended to me on a fairly regular basis--in particular, The Dresden Files, which is the series he is probably best known for. So, I was bound to pick up a copy of the first book, Storm Front, eventually. Luckily, it was readily available at my local library branch as a mass market paperback, and it immediately became my "bus book."Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden (conjure at your own risk) is a private investigator living in and working out of Chicago. He also happens to be wizard of some skill. Currently however, he is down on his luck, behind on his rent, and just a little bit worried about making ends meet. But then, almost simultaneously, a missing person case falls into his lap and he is called in by the police to consult on an investigation of a gruesome double murder. Unfortunately for Harry, as one of the only powerful magic users in the area, he quickly becomes suspect. Already on the outs with the White Council (the governing body of wizards, etc), he must work fast to track down the real culprit in order to prove his innocence. Oh, yeah--and did I mention that not only a few people want him dead?I really liked Harry, dubious past and all, as the protagonist (although he was slightly exasperating at times) and he is supported by a good handful of decent secondary characters who I look forward to seeing again in subsequent books. Storm Front is an odd mix of fantasy and hard boiled detective fiction, but Butcher pulls it off surprisingly well. I particularly enjoyed the magic system which is based more on intent, concentration, and the focusing and directing of energies more than anything else. It also has a habit of making more modern technology go haywire, which I find to be immensely appropriate. There were a couple of very minor inconsistencies in the book in addition to it being a bit repetitive, but this wasn't enough to really detract from the story overall. Harry's (well, technically Butcher's) style contains quite a bit of dry humor which I found to be greatly amusing, but others might not appreciate it nearly as much. Occasionally the whole thing is utterly ridiculous, but in a good way. The working title of the book was Semiautomagic, which gives a pretty good idea of what it is all about. The book is a lot of fun.Storm Front was a great introduction to The Dresden Files and works fairly well on its own, too. Enough detail is given to understand the world and what is going on without relying on info-dumps or explaining everything in depth, making it a lighter, less complicated read than expected. But, there is certainly plenty of material to be expanded upon in further volumes. I was never desperate to find out what was going to happen next in the story, but I always looked forward to reading it. Storm Front was a blast and I really enjoyed the book. The Dresden Files isn't a series that I personally need to own (yet), but I will definitely be picking up the next volume, Fool Moon, at the library.Experiments in Reading
  • (4/5)
    So I finally got around to reading the ever-infamous debut of The Dresden Files. It's a good read, but it didn't grab me, and I think it's more due to fact it's just been built up so much that it was almost impossible for me to really sit down and relax with this sucker. That said, the book (series) is a staple in the urban fantasy genre, and I'm glad I read it. It's worth reading, hyped up or not. :)The premise: Harry Dresden is a wizard for hire. Only he lives in modern day Chicago, and no one takes him seriously. The ones who do are either crazy or simply don't trust him, even when they need his help. And he gets more than he can chew when the police call him in on a double-homicide, one committed with black magic. It wouldn't be so bad, if everyone around him didn't think he was the killer.The full review, with spoilers, can be found in my LJ. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome.REVIEW: Jim Butcher's STORM FRONTHappy Reading! :)
  • (3/5)
    While it was not as good as the Codex Alera Series by the same author, I did not feel reading this book was a waste of time either. I was not overwhelmed by the book, but I'll give the series at least another book to grow on me before I decide if I want to keep reading it. As it is, it was pretty much the definition of a three star book for me: Interesting to read, but will not leave a lasting memory.
  • (3/5)
    It was a good first book! I enjoyed it
  • (4/5)
    Harry Dresden is a private detective who consults for the Chicago P.D. And he's a wizard. He gets pulled into a particularly nasty murder case involving black magic, mobs, prostitutes, and a new illegal drug that promises wizard's sight when taken.Noir crime novel meets wizard fantasy. A cool idea, and the plot was interesting enough, but I've never been a fan of the misogyny inherent in noir fiction and it's here in spades (the way Butcher has Dresden describe female character made my skin crawl in places, and Dresden's 'old-fashioned good guy' routine is tiresome). That, coupled with the clunky writing of a seemingly not-yet-mature writer makes this one not really a winner for me.
  • (3/5)
    Well, I tried this one. I've heard a lot of people like this series. A story of a Wizard, private detective working with the police to solve crimes. I don't like series much especially long ones so probably won't read any more.
  • (4/5)
    Quick read, but enjoyable. Haven't dabbled in urban fantasy much but I'd heard of the this one via fandom interaction.
  • (2/5)
    I was underwhelmed. I've read detective books, and I've read urban fantasy. There was nothing particularly special about any elements of the story, setting, characters, or plot. When the first book of a series seems formulaic, that's not a good sign.

    If Goodreads allowed it, I'd give it 2.5 out of 5. It's just exactly right in the middle for me. Average, average, average.
  • (3/5)
    A fun and undemanding read. A contemporary Chicago based fantasy vaguely similar to the Rivers of London, written in a first person, hard boiled private eye style, that works well.Some of it is cliched and some might be taken as sexist, although I think more cliche than sexist, but not sufficiently to spoil the story for me.
  • (3/5)
    HARRY DRESDEN—WIZARD

    Lost items found. Paranormal Investigations. Consulting. Advice. Reasonable Rates. No Love Potions, Endless Purses, Or Other Entertainment

    Harry Dresden is the best at what he does. Well, technically, he's the only at what he does. So when the Chicago P.D. has a case that transcends mortal creativity or capability, they come to him for answers. For the "everyday" world is actually full of strange and magical things—and most of them don't play well with humans. That's where Harry comes in. Takes a wizard to catch a—well, whatever.

    There's just one problem. Business, to put it mildly, stinks. So when the police bring him in to consult on a grisly double murder committed with black magic, Harry's seeing dollar signs. But where there's black magic, there's a black mage behind it. And now that mage knows Harry's name. And that's when things start to get...interesting.

    Magic. It can get a guy killed.


    This book was ok, I was told that the series gets better. I'm glad it does cause I did like Harry.
  • (5/5)
    I first came to this series through the unfortunately short-lived television show, which did color my interpretation of the character a bit (I kept picturing Paul Blackthorne as Harry, hearing that voice in my head). Also, knowing about the Nic Cage connection, I couldn't keep the occasional image of him from Sorcerer's Apprentice out of my head (he based the look on Harry because he REALLY wants to play the part).Very satisfying page-turner that captures the essence of the hard-boiled detective in the realm of the supernatural, and an excellent introduction to a great character.I really like the world that Butcher has built here, the way that magic is described (especially when Harry opens his Third Eye and sees the world as it truly is). I like the idea of the White Council, and while I hate the character of Morgan, I love his characterization, especially his infuriating antagonism towards Harry (though, through his simple lens of chaos versus order, it's understandable). I like the way vampires work in this world, the true face behind the facade. It's all just really captivating.Anyway, I've been meaning to get into this series for a while, and even have several of the later books, but I wanted to start at the beginning, and now I finally have. I'll definitely be reading more of Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: Harry Dresden is America’s only Wizard. In addition to doing small occult detective jobs on the side, he is a consultant for the special division of the Chicago Police. When someone is brutally murdered, he must find out who the culprit is – making some enemies in the process.My Thoughts: This is my second time reading this book. I started the series over for my Dresden Files Group Read that I started hosting in November. (Anybody is welcome to hop in whenever they please, even if they have not joined us for the first few books in the series). I enjoyed this book as the pinnacle of Occult Detective series beginnings. Harry is likable, yet makes stupid mistakes all the time. The other characters are weak in comparison, but I know from experience that they will develop with time. The plot is solid, and mostly not predictable. It’s a fun book, suggested for anyone who likes urban fantasy.
  • (5/5)
    I was surprised by how much I liked this book. The audio narration really meshed nicely with the character. The book had some nice surprises when it came to the story.

    My favorite thing though is the world. It's a world ruled by science where magic suddenly exists. Most people are against magic, but Harry Dresden is ballsy enough to be an openly practicing wizard. We follow his misadventures solving quite a few terrible murders in the first book.

    Overall if you like urban paranormals this is right up your alley! Also a great option if you want a change of pace from the female led ones!
  • (3/5)
    This book wasn't really what I expected. The main character is a wizard who does work for the local police department as an investigator. The story relies heavily upon the supernatural. I didn't really enjoy it but I didn't mind finishing it, I guess.
  • (4/5)
    Harry Dresden shares a first name and a profession (wizard) with Harry Potter, but the resemblance ends there. Dresden lives and works in Chicago, where he is a special consultant to the police force when they are faced with an “unusual” crime. Can’t get more unusual than two people killed “in the act” when their hearts exploded out of their chests. He also has problems with the White Council. He’s on “probation” for violations of the laws of magic and his “warden” suspects that Harry’s the one who committed the murder. To further complicate matters, one of the victims was the right-hand-man for Chicago’s crime boss, who would prefer that Harry stay out of the investigation.I have to admit that this kind of novel is out of my usual comfort zone. Yes, I read mysteries, but wizards, and demons and vampires? Just not my thing. But I can suspend disbelief with the best of them – especially when the author is as talented as Butcher is in creating a world that is logical, a plot that flows, tension that adds to the drama, and just enough humor to keep my stomach from turning at the gore. And there IS gore – it’s a dark world that Dresden inhabits and Butcher is not shy about exploring it. I’d be willing to read more of this series.
  • (5/5)
    It was a fast read, not the deepest and most philosophical book out there, but still amusing, witty and engaging throughout. Exposition was well integrated and it flowed very nicely overall.
  • (5/5)
    I had been meaning to read some of the Dresden Files books for a while now as I had heard good things through the grapevine. I was not disappointed, a decent detective story with a likable protagonist and a magic system that is interesting and well integrated. If you prefer a rougher protagonist maybe look at Richard Kadrey's Sandman Slim series.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first Jim Butcher book I have read - and it certainly won't be the last! A great central charcter and a gripping plot make this a must read.I hope the rest of the series maintains this high standard.
  • (5/5)
    The first book of the Dresden files totally convinced me. Basically nothing new here we haven't seen in a Hamilton or Shadowrun novel but Butcher simply knows how to write urban fantasy. This is how an Anita Blake book should look like after the first few books. I've already ordered the next volume.
  • (4/5)
    First book in the Dresden Files. The series starts out well but really starts to gain its strength by about book 3. Enjoyable hero always put into an impossible situation.
  • (1/5)
    I listened to part of this book on CDs but chose to stop after the first one. The Wizard Dresden is charmingly sexist. He calls female vampires vampiresses, being an old fashioned gentleman he insists on opening doors for women even if he has to race his lieutenant to the door in order to do it when she has expressed a strong desire not to have this service. Isn't that cute? Even more adorably he pronounces that the person who committed the most recent heinous magical murder had to be a woman because only a woman could hate so completely and direct that hatred so forcefully. Storm Front was written before Columbine issued in an epidemic of young male perpetuated mass murders, but I would think Butcher could have reviewed eons of human history to determine just which sex is most competent at violently expressing its hatred. How clever he was to choose to ignore all that. I don't find sexism charming or racism humorous or homophobia quaint, and I think I'm old enough now not to subject myself to this sort of insult in my reading material. I'll just scratch this series off my to read list.
  • (4/5)
    After seeing a display for The Dresdent Files at my local B&N, I decided maybe I should read the first book and see if I liked it. B&N didn't have it, so I ordered it from amazon.com and pretty much devoured the book once it arrived. If the idea of a wizard working as a PI in the present day US interests you, book 1 of The Dresden Files, at least, won't disappoint. Now I'm thinking I need to get book 2. I will say that the review I saw that said that fans of Laurell K. Hamilton would like this book did it a disservice. After having her books come up as recommendations numerous times, I got one from the library, I couldn't get into it. I tried, but I don't think I got past the first chapter. I almost passed up on this book because of that review - glad I didn't.
  • (4/5)
    This is a terrific mystery, great relistic fantasy read and it has a believable main character. The latter is difficult to find in this genre. It's definitely worth starting this series if you enjoy mysteries with a twist of fantasy and magic.
  • (3/5)
    I found Harry Dresden to be wildly cautious as a wizard, as the hero. Heroes tend to vanquish their foes in any way that's intrinsic to their customs or nature. The cautious will triumph against all the odds despite their cautiousness, and the reckless will triumph because of their recklessness. Harry Dresden is in the book, you can check him out. The book is tailor made for Harry Dresden. Dresden traps the faeries, almost goes bow chicka wow wow with one of the lustily described females in the book, fries up a demon, the usual stuff wizards are bound to go through. But as deep in danger as he is, I had no fear for Harry Dresden, and that's because he's in - (count them...)at the time of writing - thirteen more Dresden file books.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first Jim Butcher. I liked the familiar and fresh writing style and voice. I don't know Chicago but the world building felt right for USA though I didn't feel any 'color' in the characters so seemed default 'white'. Did I miss something? I like to have a stronger sense of the people in contemporary stories as well as historical or fantasy worlds . . .

    It took me a little while to warm up to Harry but when I did, the book took off for me. I can see how this series could be addictive. Good read!
  • (3/5)
    3.5 stars. I like this much better than Butcher's epic fantasy series. Harry Dresden has a great voice.
  • (5/5)
    A quick read, and really enjoyable. I devoured this book pretty much in one sitting and find myself a strong fan of Jim Butcher. I can't wait to read the rest of the Dresden novels.