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La Belle et la bête

La Belle et la bête

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La Belle et la bête

Bewertungen:
4/5 (3 Bewertungen)
Länge:
23 Seiten
19 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
31. Jan. 2016
ISBN:
9783958640696
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Jeanne Marie Leprince de Beaumont, geborene Vaimboult (* 26. April 1711 in Rouen; † 8. September 1780 in Chavanod) war eine französische Romancière und Autorin zahlreicher zu Klassikern der Kinder- und Jugendliteratur gewordenen Märchen. Sie war als Erzieherin tätig und arbeitete ab 1746 als Gouvernante in verschiedenen adligen Haushalten in London. (Auszug aus Wikipedia)
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
31. Jan. 2016
ISBN:
9783958640696
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Jeanne Marie Leprince de Beaumont, geborene Vaimboult (* 26. April 1711 in Rouen; † 8. September 1780 in Chavanod) war eine französische Romancière und Autorin zahlreicher zu Klassikern der Kinder- und Jugendliteratur gewordenen Märchen. Sie war als Erzieherin tätig und arbeitete ab 1746 als Gouvernante in verschiedenen adligen Haushalten in London.(Wikipedia)


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Buchvorschau

La Belle et la bête - Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont

Fidorra

Die Schöne und das Tier

Es war einmal ein reicher Kaufmann, der hatte sechs Kinder, drei Söhne und drei Töchter.

Weil er ein kluger Mann war, sparte er nicht an ihrer Erziehung und ließ sie in den verschiedensten Fächern ausbilden. Seine Töchter waren alle sehr schön – besonders die Jüngste wurde sehr bewundert. Von Kindheit an nannte man sie nur ›die Schöne‹ und so behielt sie schließlich diesen Namen, sehr zum Ärger ihrer eifersüchtigen Schwestern. Die Jüngste war aber nicht nur schöner als ihre Schwestern, sie war auch von liebenswürdigem Wesen.

Die beiden Älteren dagegen waren sehr hochmütig, weil sie reich waren. Sie spielten die feinen Damen und weigerten sich, die anderen Kaufmannstöchter bei sich zu empfangen; nur Leute von Adel waren gut genug, ihnen Gesellschaft zu leisten.

Jeden Tag gingen sie auf Bälle, ins Theater, machten Spaziergänge und verspotteten ihre jüngere Schwester, die den größten Teil ihrer Zeit damit verbrachte, in ihren Lehrbüchern zu lesen.

Da man allgemein wusste, dass diese Mädchen sehr reich waren, baten mehrere wohlhabende Kaufleute um ihre Hand. Aber die beiden Älteren antworteten, dass es mindestens ein Herzog oder allenfalls ein Graf sein müsse, der für eine Heirat in Frage käme. Die Schöne aber dankte denen, die um sie anhielten, sehr freundlich, meinte jedoch, sie sei noch zu jung und wolle gerne noch einige Zeit bei ihrem Vater bleiben.

Eines Tages nun verlor der Kaufmann sein gesamtes Vermögen und ihm blieb nichts als ein kleines Landhaus draußen vor der Stadt. Schweren Herzens gestand er seinen Kindern, sie müssten künftig in diesem Haus wohnen und wie die Bauern für ihren Lebensunterhalt arbeiten.

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  • (4/5)
    I really liked this story. I liked it a lot more than the Disney version of Beauty and the Beast. I really liked how this story gave all of the background. I also like how the theme of the story is that virtue out weighs everything else. This would be a great book to compare with the Disney movies because there are many differences. I would really like to use this story in a future classroom.
  • (3/5)
    A classic French 18th century version (it's not the original) of the fairy tale. Beauty and the Beast is one of my favourites ever since I saw the Disney movie as a child. Classic versions and reworking alike are stories I want to read. This has to be one of the better versions I've read, which goes into more detail than most. I loved the sisters' punishment!

    Favourite Quotes

    The definition of a monster
    "Yes, yes, (said the Beast,) my heart is good, but still I am a monster."
    "Among mankind, (says Beauty,) there are many that deserve that name more than you, and I prefer you, just as you are, to those, who, under a human form, hide a treacherous, corrupt, and ungrateful heart."

    On the kindness of sisters
    "In what is this little creature better than us, that she should be so much happier?"
    "Sister, (said the eldest,) a thought has just strikes my mind; let us endeavour to detain her above a week, and perhaps the silly monster will be so enraged at her for breaking her word, that he will devour her."
    "Right, sister, (answered the other,) therefore we must show her as much kindness as possible."

    On the qualities of a perfect husband
    "Why did I refuse him? I should be happier with the monster than my sisters are with their husbands; it is neither wit nor a fine person in a husband, that makes a woman happy; but virtue, sweetness of temper, and complaisance, and Beast has all these valuable qualifications. It is true, I do no feel the tenderness of affection for him, but I find I have the highest gratitude, esteem, and friendship; and I will not make him miserable; were I to be so ungrateful, I should never forgive myself."

    You get what you deserve
    "Beauty. (said this lady,) come and receive the reward of your judicious choice; you have preferred virtue over wit or beauty, and deserve to find a person in whom all these qualifications are united: you are going to be a great Queen; I hope the throne will not lessen your virtue, or make you forget yourself."

    Is it possible to change a leopard's spots?
    "Pride, anger, gluttony, and idleness, are sometimes conquered, but the conversion of a malicious and envious mind is a kind of miracle."
  • (5/5)
    Wonderfully illustrated. A book you will enjoy for a lifetime.
  • (3/5)
    This was a short story, which most of us know probably from watching the movie. I think the book does a much better job with the story and I am disappointed in the movie now. I think most of us are familiar with the story line. A story of a once very rich man who had 6 children, who he gave everything to. Beauty, as she was called, was scorned by her sisters because she liked to read instead of party. The dad lost his riches, found himself stranded one night and sought shelter in a large house with no one home apparently. As the story goes, Beauty ends up living with the Beast in place of her father. Although they get along, Beauty could never say she would marry Beast. Until she finds herself back home with her family, missing the Beast and realizing that is wasn't his looks that was most important, but her love of who he was. That love is what will break the spell cast upon the Beast and they both will live happily ever after. This would make a good story to read with my grandchildren as they get older. It wasn't too long and taught a good lesson on many levels.
  • (4/5)
    'Beauty and the Beast' is a short and fun story to read, at least I think so. I enjoyed it very much. I love the characters, other than Belle's sisters. As someone has stated before me, it teaches you to not judge someone on the outside, but to judge them by what's on the inside. Overall, a great, short story.
  • (5/5)
    I love the fairy tale of Beauty of the Beast and I have read a number of variations on it, but I have never read the original story. So, I was eager to do so and since it was available for free on my Kindle I thought, why not? It is a good story, although pretty bare bones compared to some of the modern retellings I have had.Everyone should know the basic story so I am not going to provide a synopsis. Many parts of this story are represented in Disney's Beauty and the Beast; although Disney did change some of the things and add some. For example Belle's father is a merchant and Gaston is a figment of Disney's imagination.The basic parts of the fairy tale that I know and loved were present though. Belle is kind hearted and loves books. The Beast is kind but volatile. They both fall in love with each other for who they are and not what they look like. All in all it is a very romantic fairy tale and I enjoyed finally being able to read the original.I recommend reading this if you are a fairy tale fan or a fan of Beauty and the Beast; it is always wonderful to see where these stories came from. If you are a big Beauty and the Beast fan I also recommend Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast by Robin McKinley and by Alex Finn, both are excellent retellings of this wonderful fairy tale.
  • (3/5)
    This version of the classic fairy tale would be too hard to be read by children. However, it is a simple story that does little to entertain an adult. I really couldn't say where this story lies on the age scale and that is a problem. I would probably recommend it to be read TO children by an adult, and that solves the problems.On to the story. I do very much like the morality of this story. It is definably a major, if not thee major, theme of the story. The whole "don't judge a book by it's cover" would have been an outlandish concept among the educated of the late 18th century.Technicalities: I am glad that the lack of modern representations of dialogue (IE starting a new line when swapping the person speaking) has been kept. This novel also does the following; "blah blahdy (he said) blah." Which I found very interesting because in modern British English we would use; "Blah blady", he said, "blah."Overall, it was interesting but I wouldn't reread it.
  • (4/5)
    I love the different sort of ways they tell this story.
  • (3/5)
    I listed to this classic on audio for free thanks to audible.com. Obviously, this version is very different than the Disney version of the story. Beauty has siblings and there is no Gusto (sp?) or singing animals anywhere. However, what made this story for me was the narrator. He had a nice deep baritone voice that translated very well as the beast. He didn’t sound so good doing the Beauty’s voice, but it was still enjoyable enough to listen.
  • (3/5)
    Beauty and the Beast, illustrated by Hilary Knight.Originally published in 1756, as part of her Magasin des enfants, ou dialogues entre une sage gouvernante et plusieurs de ses élèves, which was then translated into English in 1757 ("The Young Misses Magazine, or, Dialogues Between a Discreet Governess and Several Young Ladies of the First Rank Under Her Education"), Mme. Le Prince de Beaumont's Beauty and the Beast is the version of this popular story with which most modern readers are familiar. Although not the first written version of the tale - Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve published a much lengthier version in 1740, as part of her La jeune ameriquaine, et les contes marins (translations of both versions can be found in Jack Zipes' excellent Beauties, Beasts and Enchantments: Classic French Fairy Tales) - it was the one to survive in the popular mind, the one that was most influential, in the evolution of the story over time.This picture-book contains the complete original story by Le Prince de Beaumont, translated by Richard Howard, and illustrated by the celebrated American artist, Hilary Knight. It also includes a brief afterword by French filmmaker Jean Cocteau, whose black and white film adaptation of this story is considered a classic of the genre. As always, I enjoyed the story, being struck, in the course of this reading, by the presence of Beauty's three loving brothers. I don't think I'd ever really considered them before (some retellings leave them out altogether), but suddenly I found myself wondering about them, and whether any revisionist take had ever concentrated on them...In any case, despite my enjoyment of the text - not the best translation ever, but readable enough - I wasn't that taken with Knight's illustrations. I was surprised by this, as I did appreciate his retelling of Cinderella, but somehow, this artwork just wasn't for me. I found the Beast here interesting - he had a sort of horned, "Green Man" appearance - but I can't say that the rest of it, from human figures to background settings, appealed to me greatly. In fact, I found some scenes rather repellent - not so much because they were grotesque, but because they departed so thoroughly from my own internal vision of the tale. Still, tastes vary, so fans of the illustrator might still want to peruse this particular illustrated edition. They might also want to seek out the versions (also fairly faithful to the original narrative) illustrated by Diane Goode or Binette Schroeder, to see how other artists have dealt with the same themes.