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Bewertungen:
4/5 (74 Bewertungen)
Länge:
144 Seiten
2 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Aug 30, 2016
ISBN:
9781481450171
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Written by Scribd Editors

Ghost, Lu, Patina, and Sunny are four young athletes with just one thing in common: they were chosen for an elite middle school track team. They come from different backgrounds and have wildly different personalities, which can lead to explosive arguments. But when they work together, they are amazing. On track to qualify for the Junior Olympics, they have a lot to lose if they can’t figure out how to be a team.

Ghost has been running his whole life, but not just for the love of the sport. When he was a child, his father chased him and his mother through their apartment and down the street with a loaded gun. He was aiming to kill. Ever since, Ghost has focused all of his energy on running — literally and figuratively.

With the help of Coach, an ex-Olympic Medalist, Ghost learns the pain of seeing your chance slip away. Ghost has all of the natural talent to become legendary, but can he get his mind on track?

Written by award-winning author Jason Reynolds, Ghost was a National Book Award Finalist for Young People’s Literature and was nominated one of America’s Best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Aug 30, 2016
ISBN:
9781481450171
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Jason Reynolds is a #1 New York Times bestselling author, a Newbery Award Honoree, a Printz Award Honoree, a two-time National Book Award finalist, a Kirkus Award winner, a two-time Walter Dean Myers Award winner, an NAACP Image Award Winner, and the recipient of multiple Coretta Scott King honors. He’s also the 2020–2021 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. His many books include Stamped, When I Was the Greatest, The Boy in the Black Suit, All American Boys (cowritten with Brendan Kiely), As Brave as You, For Every One, the Track series (Ghost, Patina, Sunny, and Lu), Look Both Ways, and Long Way Down, which received a Newbery Honor, a Printz Honor, and a Coretta Scott King Honor. He lives in Washington, DC. You can find his ramblings at JasonWritesBooks.com.

Ähnlich wie Ghost

Buchvorschau

Ghost - Jason Reynolds

runners

1

WORLD RECORDS

CHECK THIS OUT. This dude named Andrew Dahl holds the world record for blowing up the most balloons . . . with his nose. Yeah. That’s true. Not sure how he found out that was some kinda special talent, and I can’t even imagine how much snot be in those balloons, but hey, it’s a thing and Andrew’s the best at it. There’s also this lady named Charlotte Lee who holds the record for owning the most rubber ducks. No lie. Here’s what’s weird about that: Why would you even want one rubber duck, let alone 5,631? I mean, come on. And me, well, I probably hold the world record for knowing about the most world records. That, and for eating the most sunflower seeds.

Let me guess, sunflower seeds, Mr. Charles practically shouts from behind the counter of what he calls his country store, even though we live in a city. Mr. Charles, who, by the way, looks just like James Brown if James Brown were white, has been ringing me up for sunflower seeds five days a week for about, let me think . . . since the fourth grade, which is when Ma took the hospital job. So for about three years now. He’s also hard of hearing, which when my mom used to say this, I always thought she was saying harder hearing, which made no sense at all to me. I don’t know why she just didn’t say almost deaf. Maybe because hard of hearing is more like hospital talk, which was probably rubbing off on her. But, yeah, Mr. Charles can barely hear a thing, which is why he’s always yelling at everybody and everybody’s always yelling at him. His store is a straight-up scream fest, not to mention the extra sound effects from the loud TV he keeps behind the counter—cowboy movies on repeat. Mr. Charles is also the guy who gave me this book, Guinness World Records, which is where I found out about Andrew Dahl and Charlotte Lee. He tells me I can set a record one day. A real record. Be one of the world’s greatest somethings. Maybe. But I know one thing, Mr. Charles has to hold the record for saying, Let me guess, sunflower seeds, because he says that every single time I come in, which means I probably also already hold the record for responding, loudly, the exact same way.

Lemme guess, one dollar. That’s my comeback. Said it a gazillion times. Then I slap a buck in the palm of his wrinkly hand, and he puts the bag of seeds in mine.

After that, I continue on my slow-motion journey, pausing again only when I get to the bus stop. But this bus stop ain’t just any bus stop. It’s the one that’s directly across the street from the gym. I just sit there with the other people waiting for the bus, except I’m never actually waiting for it. The bus gets you home fast, and I don’t want that. I just go there to look at the people working out. See, the gym across the street has this big window—like the whole wall is a window—and they have those machines that make you feel like you walking up steps and so everybody just be facing the bus stop, looking all crazy like they’re about to pass out. And trust me, there ain’t nothing funnier than that. So I check that out for a little while like it’s some kind of movie: The About to Pass Out Show, starring stair-stepper person one through ten. I know this all probably sounds kinda weird, maybe even creepy, but it’s something to do when you’re bored. Best part about sitting there is tearing into my sunflower seeds like they’re theater popcorn.

About the sunflower seeds. I used to just put a whole bunch of them in my mouth at the same time, suck all the salt off, then spit them all out machine-gun-style. I could’ve probably set a world record in that, too. But now, I’ve matured. Now I take my time, moving them around, positioning them for the perfect bite to pop open the shell, then carefully separating the seed from it with my tongue, then—and this is the hard part—keeping the little seed safe in the space between my teeth and tongue, I spit the shells out. And finally, after all that, I chew the seed up. I’m like a master at it, even though, honestly, sunflower seeds don’t taste like nothing. I’m not even sure they’re really worth all the hassle. But I like the process anyway.

My dad used to eat sunflower seeds too. That’s where I get it from. But he used to chew the whole thing up. The shells, the seeds, everything. Just devour them like some kind of beast. When I was really young, I used to ask him if a sunflower was going to grow inside of him since he ate the seeds so much. He was always watching some kind of game, like football or basketball, and he’d turn to me just for a second, just long enough to not miss a play, and say, Sunflowers are all up in me, kid. Then he’d shake up the seeds in his palm like dice, before throwing another bunch in his grill to chomp down on.

But let me tell you, my dad was lying. Wasn’t no sunflowers growing in him. Couldn’t have been. I don’t know a whole lot about sunflowers, but I know they’re pretty and girls like them, and I know the word sunflower is made up of two good words, and that man ain’t got two good words in him, or anything that any girl would like, because girls don’t like men who try to shoot them and their son. And that’s the kind of man he was.

It was three years ago when my dad lost it. When the liquor made him meaner than he’d ever been. Every other night he would become a different person, like he’d morph into someone crazy, but this one night my mother decided to finally fight back. This one night everything went worse. I had my head sandwiched between the mattress and my pillow, something I got used to doing whenever they were going at it, when my mom crashed into my bedroom.

We gotta go, she said, yanking the covers off the bed. And when I didn’t move fast enough, she yelled, Come on!

Next thing I knew, she was dragging me down the hallway, my feet tripping over themselves. And that’s when I looked back and saw him, my dad, staggering from the bedroom, his lips bloody, a pistol in his hand.

Don’t make me do this, Terri! he angry-begged, but me and my mom kept rolling. The sound of the gun cocking. The sound of the door unlocking. As soon as she swung the door open, my dad fired a shot. He was shooting at us! My dad! My dad was actually shooting . . . at . . . US! His wife and his boy! I didn’t look to see what he hit, mainly because I was scared it was gonna be me. Or Ma. The sound was big, and sharp enough to make me feel like my brain was gonna pop in my head, enough to make my heart hiccup. But the craziest thing was, I felt like the shot—loudest sound I ever heard—made my legs move even faster. I don’t know if that’s possible, but that’s definitely what it seemed like.

My mom and I kept running, down the staircase into the street, breaking into the darkness with death chasing behind us. We ran and ran and ran, until finally we came up on Mr. Charles’s store, which, luckily for us, stays open 24/7. Mr. Charles took one look at me and my mom, out of breath, crying, barefoot in our pajamas, and hid us in his storage room while he called the cops. We stayed there all night.

I haven’t seen my dad since. Ma said the cops said that when they got to the house, he was sitting outside on the steps, shirtless, with the pistol beside him, guzzling beer, eating sunflower seeds, waiting. Like he wanted to get caught. Like it was no big deal. They gave him ten years in prison, and to be honest, I don’t know if I’m happy about that or not. Sometimes, I wish he would’ve gotten forever in jail. Other times, I wish he was home on the couch, watching the game, shaking seeds in his hand. Either way, one thing is for sure: that was the night I learned how to run. So when I was done sitting at the bus stop in front of the gym, and came across all those kids on the track at the park, practicing, I had to go see what was going on, because running ain’t nothing I ever had to practice. It’s just something I knew how to do.

2

WORLD RECORD FOR THE FASTEST TRYOUT EVER

AT FIRST I watched through the gate. I was gonna keep moving, but then I saw that there were other people down closer to the track, hanging out, watching the practice. Like moms and stuff. So I joined them. Well, I didn’t sit with them, because that would’ve been weird, but I grabbed a seat on one of the other benches. My school didn’t have a track team, not that I would’ve tried out for it if it did. I was more into basketball. That was my sport, even though I had never really played. Sometimes on my walk home I would stop at the court and see if I could get a pickup game, but no one ever picked me, mainly because the old heads didn’t like running with kids my age. But I always had this feeling that if I could just get on, I’d be the next LeBron. But I never wanted to be the next . . . whoever the most famous runner is. I never even thought about it. I looked in the world records book and it says some dude named Usain Bolt is the fastest, but I had never heard of him. My dad never watched running on TV. Are there even any famous runners? Like, seriously? I never heard of none, but judging from the way these kids were stretching and jumping around on the track, some of them probably had.

Okay, let’s get some high knees! the coach was commanding. He was short, and bald, but I could tell that his baldy didn’t come from all his hair falling out. He was one of those guys who shaved it. Actually, he was one of those guys who shaved all the hair on his face except his eyebrows, which wasn’t a good look. He looked like a turtle. A turtle with a chipped tooth, wearing a hoop earring and a black whistle around his neck. Up! Up! Up!

There were boys and girls—around my age—everybody dressed in shorts and T-shirts, holding their arms out in front of them, doing a jump-march kind of thing, slapping their knees to their hands.

Come on, Sunny! It’s only the second day of practice and you’re already slackin’! the coach barked at the tallest boy out there. He was holding a clipboard and smacked it against his leg. Get ’em up!

I sat with my feet spread apart so I could spit the sunflower-seed shells on the ground between them. The salt was making me so thirsty, but I just couldn’t stop eating them. On the track, the high-knee things were followed by jumping jacks, and some warm-up laps around the track, which seemed like a really bad idea to me. I mean, why would you run to warm up? You’d be tired before it’s even time to race. Duh. Then all the runners gathered around the turtle-faced coach.

"Listen

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Was die anderen über Ghost denken

4.1
74 Bewertungen / 65 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this story for a number of reasons. There were a lot of meaningful messages and themes in this story that makes it a really appropriate book for young adult readers. The overall theme was the importance of facing your fears, with smaller messages scattered throughout the story. The main character is constantly trying to figure out his life, and eventually he realizes that he's trying to make a new life for himself, instead of living his old life. The plot of this story was really well organized and flowed really nicely. I like how the story ended right before an important even in Ghosts life, instead of the event being the end of the story. I feel like this made the whole story more about Ghosts journey, and once he had achieved his goal, the story could end. Overall this story was written well, and the language made the reader feel as though they were talking to an old friend. I enjoyed this story.
  • (4/5)
    I love the author's voice. It's a very natural, authentic way of speaking and shows pretty genuine feelings. Ghost is a sympathetic character, in spite of all his flaws.
  • (5/5)
    LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this book!! This small middle grade book is impossible to put down, even for a adults! Castle is your not so average seventh grader. His mom is raising him the best she can after his violent father was locked up and Castle can get himself into trouble. One day killing time after school, he stumbles on a track team practicing near his house and next thing he knows he's drafted on the team. He's a black kid from the wrong part of a town and he's trying to prove himself.... to himself. But even though he can outrun a lot of his problems, he can't outrun himself. A wonderful novel and I can't wait to read the rest in this series!
  • (5/5)
    I love Jason Reynolds- he could rewrite the phone book and I would be first in line to read it. This new series focusing on a running team is a great, younger addition to his work.
  • (4/5)
    Ghost is angry. That anger gets him in trouble. He's been through some serious trauma and lives in a run down area where there is never enough money. When he joins the track team and finds a new mentor in his coach, he starts to feel himself change as he builds his discipline, is embraced by his teammates, and takes responsibility for his choices. A quick, engaging read.
  • (4/5)
    This very fresh story is about Castle (who likes to be called Ghost) and is looking for his place. His dad is in jail (for trying to shoot his mom) and Castle was very traumatized by this event. He finds a running team that helps to focus his energy and give him structure.
  • (5/5)
    Simply outstanding middle grade novel! Hits on big ideas without seeming didactic or preachy. Slim and catching for reluctant readers. Nearly perfect, can't wait for more!
  • (5/5)
    When I was done with this book, I was so sad it was over. The writing and story are incredible. Loved every page.
  • (5/5)
    I have read several books by this author and have enjoyed each one. He really knows how to write for teens. In this tale we meet teenager Castle Cranshaw, a/k/a Ghost, who comes from the poor section of town and seems to get into trouble wherever he turns. He lives alone with his mom after his father tried to shoot both of them one night while drunk. One day Castle happens to meet Coach and his track team practicing in the park. He becomes intrigued with the sport and the team, eventually becoming a member. This is a timely look at friendship, honest, respect, trust, working as a team and setting goals.
  • (5/5)
    As we know in this world now, people are kind and need supported
  • (5/5)
    i loved it . it was the best book ever. my family and friends loved it to .
  • (2/5)
    Why would you end the book like that ? . You pulled me in , anticipating to read about how each person did and then to get cut off. NOTHING !!! What a horrible thing to do.
  • (5/5)
    It was so awesome, the fact about racing, and how the book ended with the starting of the race
  • (4/5)
    I liked how it was creative and not like other books :D
  • (5/5)
    I like how the book was about sports. The back stories on the characters pasts were interesting. The character changed greatly within the story, despite his previous troubles and setbacks. Its an all around good book.
  • (4/5)
    Although I don't have a favorite part of the book, I did enjoy it near all the way through. If you're looking for a book that has a genius storyline, interesting characters, and is very descriptive, I recommend this book to read.
  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Ghost is ashamed of his life and the fact that his father is in prison. He is saved from his disenfranchisement by becoming a member of an elite track team. The story of Ghost's journey from not being involved in anything to becoming an important team member is realistic and entertaining. Ghost's voice as a character is believable as are the events that take place in the story. This would appeal to young male readers interested in sports. This would also appeal to readers interested in inner city life. This would appeal to readers who want a likable but flawed protagonist at the heart of the story.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Narrated by Guy Lockard. Castle's father is in jail for shooting at him and his mother. Castle endures teasing at school for the neighborhood he lives in, the haircuts his mom gives, and the oversized clothes he'll grow into. He also has an anger management problem at school. There's one positive thing he can do though and that's run. He's fast as a ghost disappearing (hence the title and his self-imposed nickname). Castle literally walks on at a track team tryout and makes the team. There is a lot to learn about being part of a team but after some stumbles (including boosting a pair of running shoes) and Coach's tough love guidance, Castle is on his way to finding his pride of place. Lockard performs Castle's story with youthful candor and humor, capturing the essence of a city kid rolling with life's hard knocks.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    The first book in Jason Reynolds' Track series, Ghost is narrated by seventh grader Castle "Ghost" Crenshaw who accidentally becomes part of a track club when he beats their fastest sprinter during a practice run, wearing his street clothes and hightop sneakers. The coach, recognizing natural talent, talks Ghost into joining their team but soon discovers that the boy is explosive both on and off the track. Readers quickly learn the source of Ghost's pain and anger, as well as the bullying he endures at school. It's a short book, so despite several set-backs, Ghost manages to put himself "back on track" fairly quickly, with meaningful consequences for his actions, a sense of self-worth, and a greater appreciation for his friends and family. The author introduces three other characters, "newbies" to the track team, with differing socioeconomic backgrounds and family dynamics than Ghost's, so readers can look forward to getting to know these runners' stories as the series progresses. Ghost is a pretty compelling first character and his fear and embarassment from living in the projects comes across clearly despite his bravado. Strong, believable characters is where this book really shines, appealing to 4th-8th grade readers, especially those drawn to sports themes and realistic, urban fiction. There is some violence and mention of drug dealing, all described matter-of-factly and not sensationalized at all. Recommend to Kwame Alexander fans, AR 4.6, pts. 6 --JF

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    Another great book from Robert Harris. Corruption, murder, politics, allegations of war crimes and a hastily brought in ghost writer hired to complete the manuscript of a British ex-Prime Minister make the basis of this tale.Everything seems to be going well until, albeit a little odd until he finds some of the old, dead, writers belongings which raise questions to which answers are not so easily found - Plenty of intrigue and page turning mystery to keep the reader interested - it certainly kept my attention finishing it in one afternoon to evening.Would recommend. Fatherland is probably still my favourite Harris book though.
  • (4/5)
    The Ghost by Monica McCarty is a 2016 Pocket Books publication. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I have had this book for a little while, but I’ve put off reading it because it is the final book in the “Highland Guard’ series, and I really hate to see this series end. This twelfth installment features Joan Cromyn, a spy for the Scots, living in England with her cousins after she is stripped of her inheritance. She does her job so well, she had been dubbed, “The Ghost.”Alex Seton was once in the guard, loyal to Bruce, but the war has dragged on for so long, he lost faith, believing that unless he could convince the English to work on a truce, the war would never end. To that end, Alex switches sides, hoping to find a way to end the war. He has been commissioned to flush out the ‘The Ghost’, but he never anticipated running into Joan, Bella MacDuff’s beautiful daughter. He is shocked at how he reacts to Joan, but of course the couple can never have a life together, because her step-father would never allow her to marry a traitor. Can Joan convince Alex to rejoin ‘The Guard’, and fight once more for his own country?Alex is perhaps the gentlest member of ‘The Guard’, and melted my heart. He is known for his gallantry and is teasingly referred to as “Sir Galahad”. What he tries to do here is something that has happened in all wars, when weariness settles in and no solution seems forthcoming. However, the English are just as mulish and he soon finds his heart and loyalties are torn more than ever before. Joan, is an outstanding spy, and her boldness has only grown over time. But, it’s possible she is being watched and could be in grave danger. But, falling in love with Alex was never her intention, and it certainly complicates matters for her. What will Alex think if he ever discovers the truth?I really enjoyed this last installment as it has a sentimental tone to it. The story highlights the strain and long term agony of war, and the toll it takes, but was also one of the most romantic and sensual stories of the series. I think Joan helped Alex find his way back, and Alex proved to Joan that there really are good, honorable men in this world. I will really will miss this series. It is one of the very few that actually incorporated authentic historical detail, proving that historical accuracy enhances the romantic elements, and paints a realistic depiction of medieval days, the harshness of war, the grand love affairs, and the intense passions of the Scottish people. Overall, the series closes on a high note with a special happily ever after.
  • (5/5)
    ... 'she failed to free her mother from her cage but ... her mother's suffering had not been in vain'I very much enjoyed this last of the Highland Guard series. (Hold for a few moments of heartfelt sobbing as this reader farewells a series she's absolutely loved! I can see a binge reread happening in the very near future!)The turning of a 12 year old into a committed and fervent supporter of the Scottish King when Joan Comyn is forced that day to watch the torture of her mother Bella McDuff, forges the steely conviction to do all she can for the Robert the Bruce. She swears it on that day.Now Joan, disinherited and declared a bastard is acting as her cousin's maid, is a spy within the English court, gathering secrets and delivering them to the Bruce. By the Way, Joan's cousin is a piece of work; demanding ,selfish and vain. I really don't like her, and seems neither do many others.Alex Seton is a Scottish border lord, who once stood with Bruce . He turned away from that allegiance in an attempt to look for a better way for the ravaged borderers. He is now labelled 'traitor' by his highland brothers. Alex has been set to find the traitor in the English court. He is a man who stands firmly by his knighthood oath of chivalry and honor. That oath will be tested beyond endurance as he searches for the unknown enemy, The Ghost. Meanwhile, Joan is attempting to find out what Scottish and English lords have or have not sent forces, troop numbers and locations and likely attack areas so that the Bruce can strike a telling blow against the English army and their Scottish supporters. The stakes are high!This was not my favourite amongst the Highland Guard books. I really see it as a 4 star read but I rounded that up to 5 when I considered where it sits within the series, the magnetic appeal of the whole series, and the appropriateness of the mystery of Ghost being unveiled as the 'tour de force', in a fitting manner as the last of the series.A NetGalley ARC
  • (5/5)
    Another wonderful Highland Guard Novel by Monica McCarty. This time the Guard is a woman. She has quite a great reason to enter the guards, but does so "under cover. Of course some of the other guards enter the story also as well as other main characters from previous books. Its a comfortable read both for the new and remembered characters. Great plot and lots of action. Great read.
  • (5/5)
    It seems like I've been waiting forever for Ghost, I'm so impatient, is it Alex or not. Now my torment is over...no it's not, it's Joan Comyn and Alex is on the hunt for the Ghost's identity. This final instalment is full of tension and suspense as Alex and Joan fight against growing feelings for each other and then for their beliefs. A great story, well worth the wait for me. As always Ms. McCarty includes interesting historical facts from that time and separates what was fictional in the story for entertainment. I will miss the Highland Guard, I guess I'll have to start from the beginning again...which isn't too much of a task. 5/5
  • (3/5)
    Genre: Realistic fictionNarrator: “Ghost “an African-American high school student freshman or sophomoreLocation: not specified best guess, inner city New York possibly Harlem Plot: a young boy nickname ghost for his running speed is given an opportunity to join a local track and field teamConflict: “Ghost” is haunted by an abusive father who attempted to kill his mother and is now in jail. He anger issues has resulted in fights at school and suspension. His attempt to fit into the local track and field team is thwarted by his behaviorReview: While the description of “ghost” life and struggles runs true I wasn’t pleased with how certain moral issues were dealt with. The mom’s role in his life is marginalize and isn’t given due respect as opposed to the role played by the coach of the track team who takes on the role of surrogate father.Recommend: This is a good book for reluctant readers, boys especially
  • (5/5)
    What a terrible ending….it is forcing me to read the next book in the series to find out if Ghost wins his race. Okay, not such a terrible ending, but a great hook to get those non-readers into the next book. Ghost hasn’t had the best life. His temper gets him into a lot of trouble at school. The elderly grocery store owner sort of serves as a grandfather to him, and a chance meeting with a taxi driver who is a track coach helps him find focus for his actions. I just read this to get a taste of the series, but I now have to read the whole series Tracks.
  • (4/5)
    Typical novel from Jason--a realistic fiction novel set in low-income, minority area of town.Ghost wants to play basketball, but one day he ends up watching people practice running. Watching one guy, Ghost wants to show him that he’s not so great, so he lines up with him. The coach explains that tryouts were last week. When Ghost doesn’t move, Coach lets him run one time and then he has to leave. When the run is over, Coach wants him for the team. Ghost knows he can run, but he’s never heard of running as a sport. Coach talks him into joining, saying it will improve his basketball game.Ghost doesn’t have much, but he learns that he likes being on a team. At school, he has too many altercations, so he gets in trouble. He hates disappointing his mother because she works so hard to make ends meet after his father tried to kill them. He’s also obsessed with world records. Each of his teammates come from different backgrounds with different stories, but they learn to work, support, and accept each other.This novel is short and easy to read. Most people will enjoy reading it.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked the book chapter book, Ghost, by Jason Reynolds. To start I think the voice of the story and the dialog of the characters made them very realistic. For example, the book was told from the point of view of the character Castle. Castle is from a poor neighborhood where he lives with his mom. I love that when the story is told it is written in a voice that really shows who castle is. There are jokes and slang throughout the book told in Castles voice that I think really makes the character real and relatable. Another thing I like about this book is all the diversity. The kids on the track team all come from different backgrounds and Castle gets to learn about each of them. What I love is that even though, the kids on the track team know that Ghost doesn’t live in a nice neighborhood or can’t afford nice tract shoes or outfits, they don’t treat him any differently. They treat him as a teammate and a friend and I think that important for students to realize that even though everyone comes from a different background or lifestyle they should still be treated the same. The only thing I didn’t like is how it ended so abruptly! I wanted to see if Ghost had won the race and what the rest of his life on this team is going to look like. I wanted to find out if he gets scholarships to run at schools or has learned to stay out of trouble because he loves being on the team so much. I think the message of the story is that you can’t run from your problems and you must face your fears. I think it’s amazing how the author chose track as the sport to show this message because Castle in the beginning is constantly trying to run away from his problems but then realizes that he can’t and he can only “run to who he wants to be.” Ghost realizes this after his talk with his coach and how his coach shared similar experiences growing up. Ghost then saw that he needed to face his fears and stop running away from his problems.
  • (3/5)
    I don't read many thrillers, and frankly I didn't know there was such a thing as a "British thriller," but you can blame Nick Hornby for this. It was gripping, and well-plotted - as these things go, anyway - and kept me interested throughout. It comes off a tiny bit whiny, at least to this American, but then we again we made The Patriot so we probably had it coming.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book with its not very subtle satire of Blair. The plot is slightly far fetched but as usual Robert Harris keeps you reading along