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Drachenmeer

Drachenmeer

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Drachenmeer

Bewertungen:
4/5 (5 Bewertungen)
Länge:
487 Seiten
6 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Dec 18, 2017
ISBN:
9783732011698
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

High Fantasy der Extraklasse! In dieser Trilogie erschafft Nancy Farmer meisterhaft aus nordischen Sagen und Erzählungen ein Fantasy-Epos in der Tradition von J. R. R. Tolkiens Der Herr der Ringe.
Kaum einer weiß von der uralten Magie, die in machtvollen Strömen tief unten die Erde durchzieht. Doch Jack kann sie spüren. Und er hat gelernt, über sie zu gebieten. Diese Kraft ist es, die ihm das Leben rettet, als er bei einem Wikingerüberfall weit übers Meer verschleppt wird. Aber ob sie ihm auch helfen kann, als er von der ebenso schönen wie grausamen Königin der Nordmänner auf die gefährlichste Reise seines Lebens geschickt wird? Zum Ursprung aller Magie - ins Land der Trolle und Drachen.
"Drachenmeer" ist der erste Band einer Trilogie. Die Folgebände sind "Elfenfluch" und "Nebelrache".
"Absolut sagenhaft!" Rheinische Post
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Dec 18, 2017
ISBN:
9783732011698
Format:
Buch

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3.8
5 Bewertungen / 24 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    Great combination of fantasy and Norse mythology.
  • (3/5)
    Tiptree Honours/shortlist 2004. I nearly stopped reading this book after the first few chapters - the anachronisms kept jolting me out of the story. The author provided a whole list of further reading and references at the end of the book so surely it wan't beyond her to do a bit more reserach into Saxon Northumbria and at least used more appropriate names (Jack and Lucy - WTF?) and less modern idiom - it was really quite jarring. The family and farming life seemed more suited to Victorian pastoralism than Dark Ages Northumbria - and the irritating little girl could easliy have stepped out of the Narnia wardrobe. On the plus side I quite liked the slight snarkiness about the credulity of the Christians - believing any ludicrous bit of doctrine without thought. Fortunately, the Vikings arrived in the nick of time to liven things up and the story kicked on quite entertainingly, with plenty of pillaging, adventuring and general mayhem.
  • (5/5)
    Nancy Farmer is a wonderful story teller. Every book she writes is supremely researched and this is no exception. Set in the mid-700s AD, the story follows the thrilling adventures of Jack from his humble beginnings as a "common farm brat" through his apprenticeship to a Bard, then his abduction by beserker Norsemen, and his quest to the hall's of the Ice Queen for passage to Memeer's well so that he can save his sister, Lucy's life.Highly recommended!
  • (4/5)
    Nancy Farmer has taken actual historical incidents circa the years 635 to 700 and woven them into a fantasy that might have been imagined by the early Vikings. It is quite an interesting book idea, however, lacks a "golden thread" that pulls me into devoted reading. This is definitely not one of those, "I couldn't stop reading it" books. The story takes a long time to develop. I'm not even quite sure I could find a plot in the beginning, however, many small plots develop throughout the story managing to carry my interest to the end of the book. Many details are re-visited and answer lingering questions at the end. As a plus, Farmer has quite a way of developing scenery and characters (and, oh, there are sooo many of both). Farmer also has a way of using language familiar to today's teens to draw them in. I would recommend this to my average middle-schooler book clubs where discussion/question/answers abound. I would reserve it for more advanced middle-school readers looking for "something new".
  • (5/5)
    Nancy Farmer's books are widely varied and always exciting. I got so engaged in this book that it's lead me to an entire exploration of my Norse heritage. We're even going on an exploration of the Viking sites in North America. The book tells the story of Jack and his little sister who are captured by Viking Berserkers and taken by ship to their home. The boy must undertake a quest through the land of trolls to save his sister.
  • (5/5)
    A fantasy set in the time of Beowulf, in which Jack, a Saxon boy who is training to be a bard (a magician), is carried off by the invading Northmen. Jack must go on a quest to the land of the trolls, where he encounters dragons, giant spiders and more, in order to save his sister Lucy. No wonder Farmer is an award winner. Her books are well-researched, engaging and original (although she does relate the Beowulf story and other elements of fantasy writing). I think she is my favorite children's author. I loved The House of the Scorpion as well. I can't recommend her books highly enough.
  • (5/5)
    the sea of trolls was perfect for me because i love anchient civilisations!!!!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book immensely. The characters are finely drawn and sympathetic, with the possible exception of the whiny/dreamy/mad little sister. The wanna-be-Berserker shield-maiden won my heart from the beginning.

    I liked the way Farmer wove in Norse myths and legends as well as historical detail. None of that ever overpowered the sheer storytelling, either.

    Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    An ordinary Saxon farm boy with a kind of abusive dad is picked by the local bard/Druid to be his apprentice and promptly has an adventure involving some Norse pillagers, trolls, and a petulant "shield-maiden" warrior who passes as a boy. Good times!
  • (4/5)
    Thoroughly enjoyable adventure involving magic and Vikings. Had a very similar feel to Rick Riordan or the Harry Potter books. Excellent audio narrator.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a boy and his little sister who go on great adventures. They were kidnapped when Jack(main character) was kidnapped by beserkers and enslaved by Olaf One-Brow. They find mysterious creatures on their adventure and learn new things about the world. They meet a crow who accompanies them on their adventures. Jack has never seen beserkers before until they attacked his Saxon village. He was eleven when they attacked his village. His sister's name is Lucy.I really liked this book. It has so much adventure and action in it. I liked how Jack learned new things and had a crow with him. It was very thrilling reading the book. I liked the way that they would react to situations if there were ever any. Thorgil, the shipmate of Olaf, was just a jerk. I didn't like the way they just lived with each other.
  • (4/5)
    An action packed book filled with surprises. An imaginable fantasy land. A thrilling book with twists and turns of magic and betrayal.Shows you that a normal person can become someone that matters to everyone.This book was amazing. filled with magic and power. An imaginative novel. Powerful. It puts you into an amzing fantasy world filled with creatures and trolls, allies and enemies.Keevin L.
  • (5/5)
    This is an amazing historical fantasy about a boy named Jack who is captured and enslaved by viking berserkers. I'm no expert on this time period or culture, but as far as I can tell, Farmer slips a lot of historical and mythical details naturally into the story, as well as some magic and of course, trolls!
  • (5/5)
    Richie's Picks: THE SEA OF TROLLS by Nancy Farmer"He dragged Jack to the campfire and selected a knife for him to carry. 'This is for your protection. You're not to join in the fight,' Olaf said. " 'Don't worry,' said Jack. " 'I know how exciting pillaging is,' the giant said fondly, ruffling Jack's hair. It felt like a blow. 'No matter how much you're tempted, just say no.' " 'Just say no to pillaging. You got it.' " Despite reading some of her consistently award-winning tales, many of you may not be aware of how funny Nancy Farmer can be. But for those who have gotten to spend any time around her it's no surprise to encounter all sorts of terrific humor in her fabulous, fantastical new adventure, THE SEA OF TROLLS. And for anyone who has read Gordon Korman's SON OF THE MOB, with all of Vince's so-called "uncles" bearing wacky names, you'll understand why that book comes to mind as Nancy Farmer introduces us to the likes of Ivar the Boneless, Einar the Ear-Hoarder, Pig Face, Dirty Pants, Eric Pretty-Face, Eric the Rash, and Magnus the Mauler. Eleven-year-old Jack, who had been happily apprenticing with The Bard, and Jack's five-year-old sister, Lucy, are captured and enslaved by the Northmen and head off in their custody to destinations unknown. The Holy Isle that Jack sees through the haze is Lindisfarne. The Holy Isle's destruction in A.D. 793, which marked the onset of two hundred years of Viking raids on Great Britain, provides readers with a historic reference point for this year's great epic adventure story. Farmer packs THE SEA OF TROLLS' 450 pages full of humor, history, mythology, and adventure. This is a deceptively complex story, beyond the mere fact that readers encounter Vikings, trolls, dragons, Beowulf, big-mouth fathers, and all sorts of other good stuff in the same book. What readers (and Jack) are left to sort out at the end of the odyssey are their feelings about the berserkers--those Northmen invaders with whom Lucy and Jack spend all of that time. On one hand, the siblings and the berserkers have all become so close to each other as they share stories, meals, and life and death struggles of immense proportion. Through those experiences, and despite their beliefs and customs being so different from his own, Jack has repeatedly seen and felt their humanity. As readers, we come to know and love the violent and smelly Olaf and Thorgil, and their wild and wacky comrades. On the other hand, even as Jack has to steel himself for having to say good-bye to them, he has to recognize (as we also have to) that the berserkers' intent--indeed their need, if their civilization is to survive--is to return to Jack's Britain again and again, robbing and pillaging and enslaving and murdering and partaking in those other activities that my eighth grade science teacher would repeatedly tell us about. "That's why you're genetically all a little bit of everything!" insisted old Mr. Max Krenis in his white lab coat and spectacles. So how do we as readers feel about the berserkers' need to invade in order to survive? How would we feel if we were Jack? How does "Love thine enemies" relate to the story? How does the Stockholm Syndrome fit in? How will readers relate all this to our being at war right now, and to the widespread suspicion of all people from that part of the world? But there's still more to THE SEA OF TROLLS. In fact, there is a whole 'nother story before Olaf One-Brow and his homies even show up in Britain the first time. The tale begins with Jack and Lucy, their family, and the Bard. Jack's a bright kid with an overbearing father who dotes on little Lucy. The Bard is a mysterious old guy who showed up a couple of years earlier, moved into the ancient Roman house overlooking the sea, and is provided for by the community. One day when Jack is delivering provisions to the Bard, he invites Jack back for lunch. The relationship that develops between Jack and the Bard is so heartwarming that I'd be happy to just keep going back and reading the first portion of the book again and again. The old man takes the beaten-down boy and, as he teaches him song, story, nature, and wisdom, he works to make Jack understand what a special kid he really is. And, oh what stories the Bard does tell him. Then, that time as an apprentice ends for Jack with the arrival of the long ships. And the real journey begins. THE SEA OF TROLLS nearly defies categorization, there are so many sides to it. And I couldn't begin to recount what Shari tried to explain to me about all of Nancy Farmer's allusions to traditional mythologies. But the humor, the excitement and danger, the history, and the characters who are real enough to cause you to really mourn the end of the book make THE SEA OF TROLLS the latest success in the career of one of the great storytellers of our time.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this. Nice job combining the mythology and history of the region; good, strong characters; and the reader brought distinctness to each part. Full of good lessons, too, without being preachy.
  • (4/5)
    I just found out this is first of a trilogy. Well I sure hope it doesn't end in a cliffhanger. I like getting introduced to worlds and characters, not going on adventure after adventure with them.

    Finished. Gosh this is not my type of book at all, but it was just so good I'm glad I read it. Kudos to Farmer. Ironically, my 14 yo son, who has enjoyed two other books by Farmer and who loves adventure (for example Percy Jackson) did not even finish this. The characters here I thought were extra-rich, so maybe that made the difference for me.

    We both think this would be excellent for teen reluctant readers.

    It definitely did not end on a cliffhanger. Eventually I'll probably read the others, but I feel no rush to do so. I'll probably read them only to be completist about Farmer's entire output, but read all her stand-alones first.
  • (5/5)
    This book is riviting with details of epic adventure and folklore.You feel as though you are in a adventure from the start!
  • (4/5)
    Oh, a rollicking good tale! Such fun. An adventure in high order -- and with trolls. What more could you ask for? Okay, in a few places the dialogue sounds jarringly modern, and it's all pretty predictable, but who cares. Every once in a while I just have to cleanse my palate from all the heady literary books in which I'm usually nose deep and a book like this is just the ticket. YA books, when they're well written as this one is, marry humor and subtle morality with breath-taking plotting. I enjoy it utterly, and do so utterly guilt-free!
  • (4/5)
    This was a reread, in preparation for the second, [book: The Land of the Silver Apples]. I remembered that I liked it, but I couldn't remember anything about the plot. Indeed, I felt as though I was reading it for the first time.

    There are so many wonderful things about this book. I absolutely love the Nordic mythology that is woven into it and that one reference that is there the whole time, but you don't see until it jumps out and hits you in the face. The characters are wonderful, the adventure is exciting, the whole book is rich with literary references. This is why I love [author: Nancy Farmer].

    Jack, an apprentice bard, finds himself on a hero's quest when he and his little sister, Lucy, are captured by raiding Vikings and enslaved. His journey takes him through the Viking's country and Jotunheim (the land of Trolls) to the lifeblood of the earth itself.

    My only issue is in the character of Lucy. She is repeatedly referred to as a baby, and most of the time, I would say she is believably between two and four years old. However, there is one instance, when she and Jack have first been captured, that she explains her emotional and psychological state in sophisticated terms that would have been more appropriate coming from Heide, the wise woman, than a very young child. The scene is glaring in a story that is so marvelously subtle, and consequently makes me scrutinize each scene with Lucy in order to figure out just how old she is supposed to be.

    I hope that in [book: The Land of the Silver Apples], we see more of Heide, the Troll Queen, and, of course, Thorgil.
  • (3/5)
    Jack and his sister Lucy, a couple of Saxon children in 793 C.E., are kidnapped by a party of raiding Norsemen. Jack, learning the magic of being a bard (and there is magic in this book) struggles between hating Olaf and his band of berserkers and appreciating their finer qualities. I found it extremely difficult to swallow that Jack would have appreciated anything about any of them, ever.) They are taken to the North, where Lucy, the slave of Thorgill, (a young "shield maiden" about Jack's age) gives Lucy to Frith, an evil half Troll half human queen. To save Lucy, Jack, along with Olaf, Thorgill and a handful of chosen men must go to the land of the Trolls and.... Oh it's just too much.Suffice to say, it's a somewhat Hobbit like tale, in that there is a quest, and a variety of relatively unrelated adventures happen along the way. Thorgill is turned from a hateful, spiteful wretch to a somewhat more palatable girl, but unfortunately this happens because of ~magic~ not because she learns anything about life.Not a bad book, but not a great one either.
  • (5/5)
    The Sea of Trolls by Nancy Farmer is a lively tale of myth and magic set in the long ago days of yore. Jack has been the apprentice to a powerful wizard, called the Bard, for a year when trouble comes to the village. Berserkers from the north lands capture Jack and his sister, Lucy and take them away with them back to their home in the north. But this is only the beginning of the adventure, as Jack eventually must join forces with his captors and embark on quest to save his sister, Lucy from the evil half-troll queen who is planning on sacrificing her.As Jack and his companions, Olaf One-Brow, the young shield maiden, Thorgil, and a crow called Boldheart, travel deeper and deeper into Jotunheim, the homeland of the Tolls, the magic gets stronger and the creatures more strange and powerful. They eventually arrive at Ice Mountain, home to the Troll Queen Glamdis and she agrees to help him even though she is the mother of the evil queen. This was a wonderful tale based on Scandinavian legends. The author obviously researched Nordic mythology and came up with this story peopled by trolls, dragons, giant spiders and Vikings. Although aimed at children, this is a book for anyone who enjoys good fantasy, complex characters and exciting adventures. At it’s heart, this is an epic fantasy and the author often uses humor to advance the plot, this worked very well and kept the book light, fresh and fun. The Sea of Trolls was a thoroughly enjoyable book, and although it is complete in itself, this is the first of a trilogy that I am excited to continue on with.
  • (4/5)
    The story begins with a young boy named Jack who leaves home to study magic with the local bard (a type of wizard). Soon after, the bard’s magic warns him of an impending attack by Vikings. While warning his family of the attack, Jack and his younger sister are kidnapped by the berserk invaders. Forced into slavery upon the Viking ship, the two siblings must survive their captures brutality, attacks by dragons, encounters with trolls, and the most evil Queen in the land to make it back home. At nearly 500 pages, this book would appear to be quite the undertaking for its target audience, 10 to 13 year olds. But with an eclectic cast of intriguing characters and a wonderful mix of legend, historical fiction, and adventure the novel never slows down and the book is difficult to set down. It is no wonder that the author, Nancy Farmer, has received multiple Newbery honors. Her attention to detail and her historical accuracy create a story that is captivating and exciting throughout. Recommended Reads: I think this would appeal to young adults who like mythical series such as Eragon by Paolini, Lord of the Rings by Tolkien, The Lightning Thief by Riordan, and The Ranger’s Apprentice by Flanagan.
  • (4/5)
    An adventure involving boats, water, animals, mythical creatures, a bird, and finding your way back home. This story is wrapped in Norse mythology. Jack, a bard’s apprentice, and his spoiled, younger sister Lucy are captured by berserkers, a band of barbaric Viking warriors, and taken away on their boat. The story evolves into a magical quest to Jotunheim, home to trolls, before Jack can win their way back to their Saxon village home. Jack gradually discovers his strength and power though at first “He couldn’t think of a thing to do, other than stay alive for Lucy’s sake. She had no idea of their extreme danger. To her, this was merely an uncomfortable adventure.”(page 97) The book would not be as good were the violence in the book not relieved by the counterpoint of kindness, “Don’t be angry, the Bard said. “Most people live inside a cage of their own expectations. It makes them feel safe. The world’s a frightening place full of glory and wonder and, as we’ve both discovered danger…No kindness is ever wasted, nor can we ever tell how much good may come of it.””(page 449) This is the truth of fairy tales and a beautiful thread that runs through this story.Bring in a model or picture of a Viking ship. Draw a picture of Yggdrassil, the tree of life, showing the various realms in Norse mythology. Repeat the nursery rhyme of Jack and Jill went up the hill, and tell about how most nursery rhymes very often describe an historical event. In Yggdrassil there is a well, and in “The Sea of Trolls” Jack must fetch water from this well before he can save his sister Lucy and get back to his home.
  • (5/5)
     This book is about a boy(Jack) and his little sister(Lucy) and how they were taken away from the life of farming into the life of berserkers. Jack is a 11 year old and his sister is about 5 years old when they are taken away. Join the two hero's on their journey to understand the life force.