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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Bewertungen:
4/5 (170 Bewertungen)
Länge:
185 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
May 5, 2016
ISBN:
9781786750020
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Lewis Carroll’s classic tale began as a story told to a group of children on a boating picnic in 1862 and was first published as Alice’s Adventures Under Ground three years later. Its curious effect of half-dream, half-nightmare instantly captured the imagination of both children and adults, and it has been a favourite ever since. Alice’s adventures down the rabbit hole, in particular the strange characters she meets there – the constantly grinning Cheshire Cat, the Mad Hatter and the Queen of Hearts – have become world-famous, as have many of Carroll’s verses. Throughout the century and a half since its first publication, Alice’s story has been illustrated in many editions. This anniversary edition, published in November 2015, brings together the complete and unabridged text with more than 70 stunning illustrations by Robert Ingpen, each reflecting his unique style and extraordinary imagination in visualising this enchanting story.
Freigegeben:
May 5, 2016
ISBN:
9781786750020
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), was the pen name of Oxford mathematician, logician, photographer, and author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. At age twenty he received a studentship at Christ Church and was appointed a lecturer in mathematics. Though shy, Dodgson enjoyed creating delightful stories for children. His world-famous works include the novels Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and the poems The Hunting of the Snark and Jabberwocky.


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Buchvorschau

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll

ALICE was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, and what is the use of a book, thought Alice, without pictures or conversations?

So she was considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel very sleepy and stupid) whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late! (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down a very deep well.

Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything; then she looked at the sides of the well, and noticed that they were filled with cupboards and bookshelves: here and there she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed; it was labelled ORANGE MARMALADE, but to her great disappointment it was empty: she did not like to drop the jar for fear of killing somebody, so managed to put it into one of the cupboards as she fell past it.

Well! thought Alice to herself. After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling down stairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house! (Which was very likely true.)

Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time? she said aloud. I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think – (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) – yes, that’s about the right distance – but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to? (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.)

Presently she began again. "I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The Antipathies, I think – (she was rather glad there was no one listening, this time, as it didn’t sound at all the right word) – but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma’am, is this New Zealand or Australia?" (and she tried to curtsey as she spoke – fancy curtseying as you’re falling through the air! Do you think you could manage it?) And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.

Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think! (Dinah was the cat.) I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear, I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I’m afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that’s very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder? And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats? and sometimes, Do bats eat cats? for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat? when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over.

Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not a moment to be lost: away went Alice like the wind, and was just in time to hear it say, as it turned a corner, Oh my ears and whiskers, how late it’s getting! She was close behind it when she turned the corner, but the Rabbit was no longer to be seen: she found herself in a long, low hall, which was lit up by a row of lamps hanging from the roof.

There were doors all round the hall, but they were all locked; and when Alice had been all the way down one side and up the other, trying every door, she walked sadly down the middle, wondering how she was ever to get out again.

Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice’s first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them. However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!

Alice opened the door and found that it led into a small passage, not much larger than a rat-hole: she knelt down and looked along the passage into the loveliest garden you ever saw. How she longed to get out of that dark hall, and wander about among those beds of bright flowers and those cool fountains, but she could not even get her head through the doorway; and even if my head would go through, thought poor Alice, it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin. For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.

There seemed to be no use in waiting by the little door, so she went back to the table, half hoping she might find another key on it, or at any rate a book of rules for shutting people up like telescopes: this time she found a little bottle on it ("which certainly was not

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3.9
170 Bewertungen / 170 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Here is a story I have always heard about, but never got to read or even see one of its film adaptations. I placed it under the banner of 'ILS 516 Modern Fantasy' because just as Young et al. (2020) stipulate, any work of modern fantasy has its author known (p. 148). Since this was around the time I had begun to exhaust the stack of books I checked out before my library closed, I decided to take a chance on the audiobook version for us LION cardholders. I did just that and felt that as good as Scarlett Johansson is at reading this book, it is really disappointing there are no sound effects. See, my personal measuring stick of an audiobook is Stephen King’s The Mist. My dad used to have it on cassette being told with so-called ‘3D Sound.’ This basically meant that the text had sound effects accompany it. So, if a part of the story took place during a rainstorm, you actually hear the rain in the background of the conversations. This made the book literally come to life in a way that could not be achieved from just reading it. I was hoping that because this was a fantasy story, there would be sound effects added too. For example, one perfect usage would have been when Alice falls into the pool of her own tears at the beginning; there could have been the sound of her falling into water. Yet, not a single sound effect is used. Ultimately, even though I really liked the story itself, I am disappointed it did not take advantage of the audiobook format more.
  • (5/5)
    Oozing charm
  • (4/5)
    It's hard to review 2 books at once. I loved the first book. But I was not impressed with the second. Like many, I've been spoiled by movies so I was very disappointed to find out the Jabberwocky was just a poem. I was also surprised at how young Alice truly is in the books. All-in-all was an interesting read.
  • (1/5)
    The best thing I can say for this book is it is short.

    I had a friend who loved Lewis Carroll, I had some time and it was cheap and I figured I'd give it a try. Honestly not sure why I finished. I remember thinking "WTF? I don't know if I can stand to finish this", checking the progress bar and seeing I was already a third of the way through. And just figuring if it was that short might as well.

    It never was so bad I wanted to throw it through a wall, but the most enjoyment I got out of it was recognizing scenes from the animated Disney movie. Kudos to Disney for managing to make an engaging film out of this word vomit.
  • (4/5)
    I don't feel like the modern illustration fits with the classic work for some reason. Otherwise the images are beautifully done.
  • (5/5)
    Great Illustration
  • (3/5)
    A good way to introduce a child to the idea that words and sentences can have multiple meaning depending upon the context. A sort of point-of-view pontification.
  • (2/5)
    The problem is this particular edition (Bookbyte digital), which is not complete, and does not include the introductory poems.
  • (2/5)
    Ugh, I hate nonsense books. I get that this is for kids and the whole premise is fun nonsense. When Alice falls asleep she goes down into a rabbit hole and enters Wonderland, a place where everything is fun and nonsense. There is no point to anything and everyone is weird and can you tell how much I dislike this book. There is no plot, just a dumb kid named Alice, wandering around Wonderland talking to animals and packs of cards, playing croquet with flamingos and the like. Totally bonkers.
  • (4/5)
    Okay, so we all know this story, most of us know it very well. It's an absurd children's book, and as I listened, I kept thinking about how much my preschool aged granddaughters would love the overall silliness of this classic.

    I listened to the new Audible production performed by Scarlett Johannson. I was very impressed with her ability to change voices, which was so extreme, I wondered how much of it was done in post-production. If it is all her, with no electronic modification, I'm very impressed. Movie directors should be able to utilize her voice skills for so many characters.

    At any rate, the rating is primarily from the performance. Surprisingly, I am not a fan of the story at all (I'm not a fan of absurdist literature - it's like bizarro books today: completely senseless). Oh well, to each his own.

    I'd recommend this for people who enjoy classic children's literature and for those who enjoy hearing a book skillfully read.
  • (4/5)
    It's hard to review 2 books at once. I loved the first book. But I was not impressed with the second. Like many, I've been spoiled by movies so I was very disappointed to find out the Jabberwocky was just a poem. I was also surprised at how young Alice truly is in the books. All-in-all was an interesting read.
  • (3/5)
    There really is a lot of nonsense in this.
  • (4/5)
    This is a fun book. Not that race makes a difference but I do like that Alice in this book is of "color". Alice in Wonderland is a classic and favorite story of mine. I was on the journey from the beginning to the end with Alice. Young readers will have an enjoyable time looking at the pictures as well as reading this book. Parents will want to check out all of the books in this line by Penguin.
  • (4/5)
    Delightfully fun, whimsically amusing and what an imagination! Between the outlandish characters, the silly puns and the play with logic, it is easy to see how this book is such a great story for both children and adults. Obviously, a reader needs to love - or at least appreciate - the nonsensical fun to fully enjoy this story, especially given the caricatures and the mayhem that is Wonderland. I can see where some adult readers may revisit this one for nostalgic childhood reasons, but I think I probably appreciate the story more as a adult reader, than I would have reading it as a young girl. Overall, very happy to have finally read this children's classic.
  • (5/5)
    Why do you want another copy of Alice in Wonderland when you already have at least three copies and other abbreviated versions? Well, it was really for the illustrations. I really like Helen Oxenbury's work and here was a great collection of her work for $5 at the local markets....who could resist. OK, I haven't read the story again. Actually, I never liked the story as a kid. Adults always seemed to be foisting it on me and I thought it was all very weird and unbelievable and full of tricky insider jokes for adults. I shared a flat (apartment) once, however, with a guy who was very keen on Alice in Wonderland and was always citing stuff from it ....like..."Words mean precisely what I want them to mean ...neither more nor less"and...."Would you please tell me which way I ought to go from here?"....That depends a good deal on where you want to get to", said the Cat. I don't much care where ..." said Alice. "Then it doesn't matter which way you go", said the Cat. it It was only as an adult that I kind of got interested in the author who was a lecturer in Mathematics and logic at Christ's College Oxford. He was Charles Dodgson who went under the pen name of Lewis Carroll. So the book is full of logical questions, paradoxes, illogical answers and mathematical quirks....... But Charles Dodgson seemed to have a rather unhealthy interest in young girls. I recall seeing a book of his that I think contained photos of young girls. (He became interested in photography and about 60% of his photos were of young girls. Seemed just slightly creepy to me.....but give him the benefit of the doubt. Maybe he just liked writing stories to entertain. He published Alice in Wonderland in 1865 and it became increasingly popular. Anyway, that's not why I bought the book. I bought it for the illustrations and they really dazzle. Helen Oxenbury has a wonderful way with perspective and a slightly cartoonish drawing style that is perfectly suited to this particular book. There are some of her pencil sketches and a few watercolours combined with pencil backgrounds. All in all it works very well. I think she has captured the spirit of Alice rather well. In many of the versions I've seen , Alice comes across as a rather bossy and determined little girl but her she is confident but sympathetic. And a rather likeable character from the drawings. Needless to say, she is a modernised Alice and, I think has much more appeal than the older "tougher" Alices.A great version of the book.
  • (4/5)
    I plan to read Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy and thought it might be interesting to reread the book, this time in French. >My first observation was that the translator did a good job and most of the book was translated well - at least to the limits of my memory. Then I did notice some shortcomings, for instance the wordplay in the mouse poem relating the mouse's tail to the tale being told just didn't work in French. However, the translator did include good footnotes. Here, he explained differences in the French and English version. He also added some historical notes that I found added value to the story. This included some symbology that I was completely unaware of. Some of the jokes and puns were, if my memory serves, and perhaps were replaced with new or similar ones taking advantage of the language differences.Overall, it is a quick read, delightful and imaginative and well worth some time spent.
  • (5/5)
    Many of the reviews on this site do not relate to the Salvador Dali illustrated book, but rather to another illustrator. Very Confusing.I love Alice's imaginative adventures and her increasing confidence as she accepts her changing size and bizarre circumstances.Yet, just as I did not enjoy the treatment of animals in a cruel way - the flamingoes, hedgehogs, guinea pigs - when I first read the book as a child and, although I was happy with the final resolution of the Queen and her deck of cards, the constant "Off with their heads!" was and is still annoying.Dali's paintings remain dramatic and an eternal evocative mystery. So good that this book has come to all of us!
  • (4/5)
    Silly but interesting.
  • (4/5)
    You have to love a children’s book that features a large blue caterpillar smoking a hookah. This is a classic of fancy and imagination, featuring iconic characters in the White Rabbit, Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat, and Queen of Hearts among others. It stands up to the test of time and is an enjoyable read even for an adult; there is a lot of cuteness here. I love the different branches of arithmetic per the Mock Turtle: “Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision."
  • (5/5)
    This classic children's book is a timeless tale that captures children's imagination. This book can be used to introduce upper elementary students to math concepts such as graphing and beginning geometry. Using the characters in the book which are depicted as a deck of cards, children can explore laws of probability using a standard deck of playing cards.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: A little girl by the name of Alice follows a white rabbit down a hole where she ends up in another world. She has many many adventures in this world but eventually grows tired of it and wants to go home. After trial and error she finally gets there.Personal Reaction: I adore this book. It's one of my favorite books as well as movies. It is a crazy story but it really opens up a persons imagination. Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Have the kids draw their own types of Wonderlands.2. Use it to teach about being open to different things.
  • (1/5)
    Who knew this children's classic was so horrible?? Not as bad as Looking Glass, probably because of having seen the movie I was a little desenstized to the complete and utter nonsense of it all.
  • (5/5)
    This is my boyfriend's favorite book, but quickly became one of mine, as well. I think that it was well written, funny, and there's a lot to take from it. In the end, I could go on and on about how much Alice seemed like a little brat, or how the mad tea party is my favorite scene, but that would make this review much bulkier than I would like. However, I would have to say that the story is able to be read over and over, which I have done.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent story and drawings
  • (3/5)
    Lovely colour illustrations
  • (5/5)
    The book that made me want to read!
  • (4/5)
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is the Classic nonsense tale of an English girl falling down a rabbit hole, there to encounter the strange world of absurdly anthropomorphized animals and playing cards, enigmatic messages and, well, sizing issues :-D

    A Classic is usually a novel that has become so ingrained in the collective memory or culture, that one might not be sure whether one has read it or not. The reputation of the book itself precedes the actual experience of reading it and the characters are often the prototypes of later iterations and any number of adaptations. If you've never experienced Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, or read it once before, or even if you've read it multiple times, it bears (another) reading. As familiar as many are with the tale, to actually read or hear the original, un-Disneyfied tale is a pleasure as the nuances of the language surface and fade in ephemeral logic and gently wry humor. The subtlety, whimsy and detail of Wonderland, its inhabitants and their language lends itself to repeated discoveries.

    Michael York as the narrator of this audiobook edition brings a nice range of character voices to the story, never sounded absurd himself as he renders the tale of Alice with obvious affection and a master storyteller's grace. His smooth, somewhat effete British voice evokes the romance of an afternoon spent on the Thames and brings the curiouser and curiouser world of Carroll's creation to life.

    Redacted from the original blog review at dog eared copy, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; 07/12/2011
  • (5/5)
    As a child, I read the stories of Alice in Wonderland (and, later, Through the Looking Glass) with a sense of wonder and amusement. Alice shows that it is possible to engage with a world which makes no sense on her own terms; she is not overwrought at her lack of understanding of the improbable and bizarre happenings around her. She brings reason to bear in narrow, specific cases (such as when arguing with the Red Queen), but is not paralysed by the irrationality of general occurrence. In this, she is like all children - dealing with reality not by knowing, but by exploring and engaging. This sense of innocent inquiry creates great sympathy in the younger reader.As an adult (older, grizzled and perhaps wiser), re-reading these stories once again provokes wonder and amusement - but this time, the wonder is at the ingenuity of the author and the amusement is if anything greater. This shift in reaction is because, as an adult, I know a few things: I know that it is impossible (in general life!) for soldiers to be playing cards, for Cheshire cats to disappear from the tail and for children to shrink and grow at the slightest provocation. Knowing this increases my admiration for Lewis Carroll, as he has constructed a world where the impossible occurs, but not without its own logic.While there is nonsense, there is structure - and the impossibilities have the common feature that they are all things which might occur to an imaginative young child while daydreaming. Thus they are not simply random (which would be nowhere near so satisfying to read), they are linked and interlocked to form a thoroughly pleasing structure. The underlying structure of the poem Jabberwocky has been analysed at length in [Hoftstadter], which elicits further wonder at the interlinked meanings and senses in the work. The amusement, of course, comes from understanding more of the jokes!
  • (3/5)
    The edition I read was actually an online version with the same illustrations and everything. It is a rather fun book, and is certainly far deeper than the "children's book" that it is depicted to be on its surface. I wouldn't say I loved it, but it was certainly worth finally reading the book behind a story I have heard so much about. The language twists alone made it well worth it, as there is definitely a lot of creativity there.
  • (2/5)
    Ugh. Alice is ridiculously annoying. I did not enjoy the plot of this, the poetry, the constant repetition of ideas (the shrinking and growing). None of the characters were in any way interesting. I don't understand the universal love of this book.