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A "Secret" in Washington DC

A "Secret" in Washington DC

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A "Secret" in Washington DC

Länge:
253 Seiten
2 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jul 7, 2018
ISBN:
9780463098424
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

There exists a “secret”, hidden for more than a century in our nation's capital. As of yet, it has been virtually unknown by anyone of the general public.... it shows, conclusively, that the true builders of Washington DC have known of, and forecasted, ever since the time of the Civil War, of the coming of the iPhone.
At one of the main entrances to the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington DC, is an obscure Monument to the inventor of the first commercial photographic process, the French artist and photographer Louis Daguerre. Created by the sculptor Jonathan Scott Hartley in 1890, it has an inscription on its base that, today, most tourists only barely notice. It states:
“Photography, the electric telegraph, and the Steam engine are the three Great Discoveries of the Age. No five centuries in human progress can show such strides as these. @@@@” - author unknown
Yet within this mysterious inscription, is the key to unlocking a hidden pattern that has been built throughout all of Washington D.C. It includes numerous monument sites, the Library of Congress, and even the Capital building itself.
This hidden pattern, again, conclusively predicts the coming of the iPhone, decades, and even well over a century before such a device ever existed. The author spent about ten years researching and writing this book, and has provided meticulous documentation for all the evidence it presents. This is more than just a book, it itself is a guide to this amazing secret that exists within the capital city. Next time you visit DC you can visit these sites yourself and see, first-hand, this remarkable, hidden pattern, which, in turn, points directly to the coming of the iPhone. You will never look at Washington DC, or our nation's history, the same again.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jul 7, 2018
ISBN:
9780463098424
Format:
Buch

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A "Secret" in Washington DC - Christopher Drew

Footnotes

Acknowledgements

All the photographs and images of the works of Constantino Brumidi in the nation’s Capital Building, unless otherwise specified, come directly from the Photo Album and the archives of the Architect of the Capital (www.aoc.gov). As government works, they have no copyright, and are a part of the Public Domain.

In addition, the photos of the interior of the main Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress come from the archives of the Library’s main site (www.loc.gov), unless otherwise specified. Many of them are from the photo album of the professional photographer Carol Highsmith, and these have been particularly helpful. All these photos, as well, have been released into the Public Domain.

Two very important reference books have been used extensively in the second and last section, titled, The Third Wave. The first is Brian Merchant’s book, The One Device: The Secret History of the Iphone. It is one of the only books to date, to describe, in detail, the events and the processes leading to the creation of the Smartphone. Another book is Jeffrey Pomerantz’s book Metadata, one of the few resources to detail extensively what Metadata is, its history, and the importance of the Smartphone as one of its primary collectors. Both books have been cited extensively and were very helpful in the creation of this book.

Finally, and perhaps most significant, is Tom Wheeler’s book, From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future, in which he describes, in detail, all three information networks in history, as well as the iphone’s critical role in shaping information technology. These, in turn, form the backbone upon which many of the ideas of this book are based. Wheeler has long been regarded as a foremost expert in telecommunications (as head of the FCC between 2013 and 2017). As such, his opinions are held in high regard by the IT Industry. Again, his book has, as well, been extensively cited and played a crucial role in this book’s formation.

Preface

The purpose of this book is to show that the recent invention of the iphone and the android mobile devices, or what, altogether, are called Smartphones, have long since been foreseen to take place, by the original architects of the city of Washington D.C. They encoded this, their secret knowledge, onto several major monuments throughout the city. These features can still be visited and seen by anyone, even unto the present day.

This information, in the nation’s Capital, shows the coming of the Smartphone in three waves throughout history: the first wave takes place in 1280-1300 in central Italy, the second in 1780-1800 in Britain/France, and the final wave, the actual creation of the iphone, in 1995-2015, in Silicon Valley, California, the present day.

These three dates are not at all random, but rather represent the dawn of the three most important information networks in history. The first period, that of 1280-1300, is the spread of Paper Mills and later the Printing Press throughout Europe, as the fuel to start the book-fed Renaissance. Meanwhile, the second period, 1780-1800, is that of the laying of telegraph wire and the railroad in the New World, this time to coincide with the Industrial Revolution. Finally, 1995-2015 is a crucial point in the Internet and Computer Age, that of the rise of ‘Big Data’. The most important development during this time period has been the creation of the microprocessor, the iphone and mobile devices.

The first part of the book, titled The Monuments, focuses solely on the encrypted information in these Washington D.C. sites, and how, specifically, it relates to the first two waves. The second part, titled The Third Wave, then shows how these two previous waves have now converged onto a single invention, as main components of the modern-day iphone.

The coming of the Smartphone was no accident, but rather a predetermined, and long foreseen happening, in which the most ancient knowledge in the Capital City has now merged with the most current of inventions.

As always, the reader is welcome to visit the sites, do the research themselves, and to form their own conclusions.

[*****Note: At the end of the book are also included four Supplemental Text sections. These contain information, that would not fit in anywhere, yet nonetheless are important to its main contents. In particular, Supp. Text #3: Authentication: The Bulletin Building and the Garfield Monument is most significant, as it provides direct proof that all that has been stated in this book is the truth. *****]

Part I The Monuments

Chapter I: The Introduction

(See Below[1]) – Daguerre Monument, Washington D.C.

National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC, Present Day.

At the east entrance to the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington D.C., along 7th and F street, is a monument to the inventor of the Daguerreotype, the world’s first commercial photographic process, the French artist and photographer Louis Daguerre. One obscure feature of the monument is a quote, found on the side of its granite base, that states:

Photography, the electric telegraph, and the Steam engine are the three great discoveries of the Age. No five centuries in human progress can show such strides as these. @@@@

Although the American sculptor Jonathan Scott Hartley created this statue as far back as 1890, no known author has ever been cited for this quote, and today most visiting tourists never give it any more attention beyond that of a slight, cursory glance.

…..yet within it lies a secret, that of which forms the key to unlocking an entire pattern found throughout center city, Washington D.C. This knowledge then, in turn, ultimately leads to, and converges upon the present-day coming of the iphone. This secret is that it is connected to a very similar, second quote, written earlier, by the British Author Francis Bacon. This second quote contains the cypher, or the coded message within the writing, that unlocks this hidden network:

It is well to note the force, and the virtue, and the consequences of discoveries. For nowhere is it more evident than in these three, previously unknown to the ancients (the Greeks) and whose recent origins, although obscure and inglorious, have done much to alter the face of and to change the stage of things of the whole world; these are, namely, the compass, gunpowder and the printing press: the first in navigation, the second in warfare and the third in literature, and from whence have followed innumerable changes, insomuch that no empire, no sect and no star has ever exerted greater influence over human affairs than these three mechanical devices.

-Francis Bacon, Aphorism CXXIX (129), Book 1,

Novum Organum, 1620.

These two quotes were also not at all randomly selected, as they represent the dawn of the first two information networks in history[2]. The quote on the Daguerre Monument is a symbol of the second network, that of the railroad and the laying of telegraph wire in the New World, that coincides with the industrial revolution. Each of the three inventions listed here, as we will later show, played a key role in creating the foundation of this era.

Likewise, the earlier quote, in Novum Organum, represents the first information network, the rise of the Gutenberg printing press throughout Europe, to coincide with the formation of the Renaissance Era. Many historians have also believed that these three inventions were also the main catalysts to start this new age, as they increased access to knowledge, on a large scale, respectively, via navigation, conquest, and available printed material.

Finally, the third, most current Information Network is the rise of the computer, the internet, and that of Big Data [3]. In this period, the three inventions have now re-emerged, in more modern forms, as components of the iphone: these are, respectively, GPS, the camera phone, and Telecom. The iphone and android devices, what together are termed smartphones, because of their singular impact, have often been called the most significant development of this era.

The timeline is thus:

1. The compass (1st wave) Steam Power for Navigation (2nd wave) GPS (3rd Wave)

2. Gunpowder* (1st wave)……Photography (2nd wave)……………….Camera Phone (3rd wave)

3. Printing Press (1st wave)…..Telegraph (2nd wave) 21st century Telecom

(phone, email, Text messaging, internet)

(3rd wave).

Whereupon, the 1st wave (1280 - 1300) – beginning of the renaissance era

2nd wave (1780 – 1800) – beginning of the Industrial revolution

3rd wave (1995 - 2015) – rise of the Internet, Big Data [4], and the iphone

* - The Gunpowder formula reveals the main compounds used in photography, as is shown later in chapter III.

The rest of this book is dedicated to describing, in detail, this chart, the role that the rest of the monuments in Washington DC play, and how both quotes match each other, precisely, to show all of this.

(See above[5]) – A close-up of Francis Bacon’s Lost Quote:

However, first we will take a much closer, in-depth look only at the original passage in Francis Bacon’s 1620 Book Novum Organum…..

Back to the Top

Chapter II: Francis Bacon’s Original Quote:

It is well to note the force, and the virtue, and the consequences of discoveries. For nowhere is it more evident than in these three, previously unknown to the ancients (the Greeks) and whose recent origins, although obscure and inglorious, have done much to alter the face of and to change the stage of things of the whole world; these are, namely, the compass, gunpowder and the printing press: the first in navigation, the second in warfare and the third in literature, and from whence have followed innumerable changes, insomuch that no empire, no sect and no star has ever exerted greater influence over human affairs than these three mechanical devices.

-Francis Bacon, Aphorism CXXIX (129), Book 1, Novum Organum (1620)

This made the late Lord Saint Alban, (Francis Bacon), entitle his work Novum Organum, which, though by the most superficial of men, who cannot get beyond the title of nominals, it is not penetrated nor understood, it really openeth all defects of learning whatsoever, and is a book which extends to the famous author a long future.

-Ben Johnson, on the death of Francis Bacon (1626).

Novum Organum[6] (latin for New instrument, or short for New Instrument of Science), is a book written by Francis Bacon, in 1620. It is said to be a primer for the understanding of all knowledge. (Francis Bacon is rumored to be the last person in history who knew everything).

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) wrote the book when he was Chancellor of England (1618-1621), and, when it was finished, he personally presented it to the then monarch, King James I.

Bacon was a philosopher, essayist, and politician. Even though he himself did not uncover a single scientific theory or invention, he is considered, today, as the founding father of the study of empirical, or rational knowledge, upon which all modern science is based. As such, Bacon could also be considered the founder of the study of the importance of information networks, which is any form of instrument that breaks down the barriers to and allows information to travel. His most famous quote is

Knowledge is Power.

Each of the three discoveries listed in the above quotation, from Novum Organum,

(Francis Bacon, Baron Verulamen, Viscount Saint Albans, c. 1618, National Portrait Gallery)

had first, previously, been discovered in Asia, before, centuries later, being transmitted to the Europeans. They are now known as The Four Great Inventions, which are (1.) the magnetic compass (2.) gunpowder (3.) papermaking and (4.) the printing press (whereupon papermaking is seen as an essential element to the printing press). A closer look reveals two things:

(1.) The origins of the transmission of each invention can be traced to the

same, very specific time and place: northern or central Italy, between the years 1280-1300.

(2.) each invention then immediately underwent a critical change in the refinement of its composition, and then began to spread rapidly throughout Medieval Europe.

Bacon’s quote is not at all a random comment, but rather the time period described here (1280-1300) is what we are now calling the first wave. As we will later show, it is the precursor to the coming of the iphone, mobile devices, and ultimately what he (Bacon) believed would be a future Age of infinite knowledge for all Mankind.

It is, in fact, what the original builders in Washington DC have used as a template to signify the starting point of information networks in history…..

As such, we will examine the transmission of each invention, beginning with…..

Back to the Top

Chapter II(a.) The (magnetic) Compass

The magnetic compass was first introduced in Europe in the latter part of the 13th century (circa 1296) and has since provided the basis for almost all modern, seafaring navigation. Many historians believe this invention was of such importance, that it alone began the Renaissance. Before its discovery, European Ships rarely left the coastline, as a passage from John Dryden’s verse (1700) describes:

Crude the navigation of their ships were then

Without a compass or a meridian in sight

They rarely left the ken of the shoreline

And knew true north only when the Pole Star shown bright.

Another passage from John Robertson’s Elements of Navigation (1754) echoes a similar sentiment: Before the introduction of the Mariner’s compass, that happened in the latter part of the 13th century, navigation was often a tedious, precarious pursuit. Ships back then rarely left the coastline. [7]

Magnetic compasses had beforehand existed in Asia for hundreds of years, yet their transmission to Europe was the first time a compass was ever specifically used for seafaring navigation. For this to happen, two ‘key" refinements had to occur:

(1.) The magnetic needle had to be suspended, either in water (wet), or in mid-air (dry), as to remain horizontal while on board a seagoing vessel.

(2.) The compass needle had to be boxed, and oriented within a set of nautical directions, today, called the modern mariner’s compass Emblem.

The most well-known legend of the compass’s origin, from Amalfi, Italy, was that a sailor named Flavio Gioja invented it in 1296, although this is often disputed, as there has never been any historical evidence that such a mysterious man ever existed.

Many people, throughout history, including William Gilbert of Colchester, England, who wrote the first known book to fully describe magnets, titled De Magnete, have believed that it was Marco Polo, the Venetian Merchant, who first brought back knowledge of this device, after returning from a 24-year journey through the caravan trails of the Silk Road.[8]

This makes sense,

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