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Die Kunst des Krieges: Wahrhaft siegt, wer nicht kämpft

Die Kunst des Krieges: Wahrhaft siegt, wer nicht kämpft

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Die Kunst des Krieges: Wahrhaft siegt, wer nicht kämpft

Bewertungen:
3/5 (2,461 Bewertungen)
Länge:
91 Seiten
1 Stunde
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 25, 2017
ISBN:
9783962558321
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Sun Tsus Werk ist ein zeitloser Klassiker der Strategie-Literatur, den jeder kennen sollte. | Psychologische Führung aller Beteiligten, Flexibilität und Taktik gegenüber dem Gegner, äußerste Disziplin in den eigenen Reihen - das sind Prinzipien, die allgemeingültig sind und nicht nur in der Armee, sondern in allen Organisationen, ja sogar im persönlichen Leben und in der Mann-Frau-Beziehung von entscheidender Bedeutung sind. | Für die eBook-Ausgabe neu lektoriert, mit modernisierter Rechtschreibung und verlinktem eBook-Inhaltsverzeichnis. In neuer, für das Textverständnis optimaler Übersetzung. Mit Begleitwort im Anhang | Über den Autor: Sun Tsu (auch Sun Tzu, Sunzi) war ein für seine Erfolge berühmter chinesischer Feldherr, der zwischen ca. 550 und 490 vor Christus lebte. Sein Strategieratgeber "Die Kunst des Krieges" dient bis heute in Militär, Politik und Wirtschaft als faszinierendes Lehrbuch.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 25, 2017
ISBN:
9783962558321
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


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Was die anderen über Die Kunst des Krieges denken

3.0
2461 Bewertungen / 69 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    I'm so glad I finally read this historic book. I found it very interesting and understand why it has been adapted to suit other fields -- notably management. And the version of the book I bought is beautiful in itself. Bound in traditional Chinese style, with each page folded in half and only printed on the outside. Hard to rate -- it is what it is as they say -- but I'm rating it highly because it has stood the test of time.
  • (3/5)
    you kind of have to read this, yah. so privately canonized.
  • (5/5)
    An enduring classic, an absolute must-read for every business person and military mind the world over.
  • (3/5)
    All the guff about it being the greatest management text in history is of course utter nonsense, but it's an interesting read. I preferred and would recommend the Hagakure if you're after samurai warrior philosophy.
  • (2/5)
    During a sermon, the rabbi talked about this book and said that it was really a philosophy on how to live life. When I started reading it, I saw that it really is a book on how to wage war. Definitely not what I expected and definitely not a book I would ever want to read.
  • (5/5)
    The version I have also has a second section for commentaries on all the passages. It's an incredibly useful and insightful book, and not necessarily just for literal war.
  • (5/5)
    Tactics and strategies that apply to everyday life. This book is excellent reading to make you think about how to deal with the day to day struggles of life. It helps you position you versus your opponent. Your opponent need not be any one person. It could be a corporation. It could be an establishment. It could be a situation you are facing. I was once told that what you get out of a book is the effort you put into a book. It is my hope that this book can help someone master how they deal with day to day life. Let me know what you think. By the way, how many Enron or Worldcomm employees do you think read this book?

    On another note, I would ask that you do not take this book literally. It is laced with allegory and a ton of symbolism. Please take its contents and apply them to your life for the good of all.
  • (5/5)
    Sun Tzu, foi um profundo conhecedor das manobras militares e escreveu A ARTE DA GUERRA, ensinando estratégias de combate e táticas de guerra. Súdito do rei da província de Wu, viveu em turbulenta época dos Estados guerreiros na China, há 2.500 anos e era um filósofo-estrategista que comandou e venceu muitas batalhas. Com inteligência e argumentos muito racionais, o autor expôs a importância da obediência, disciplina, planejamento e motivação das tropas. É uma obra original e valiosa porque é considerado o mais antigo tratado de guerra e hoje parece destinada a secundar a guerra das empresas no mundo dos negócios. A lição que se tira da obra é que a primeira batalha que devemos travar é contra nós mesmos. Para atingir uma meta, o autor ensina, que é necessário agir em conjunto, conhecer o ambiente de ação, o obstáculo a ser vencido e, é claro, conhecer seus próprios pontos fortes e pontos fracos. A grande sabedoria é obter do adversário tudo o que desejar, transformando seus atos em benefícios. Em relação aos comandados, é preciso manter uma disciplina rígida, ser respeitado, ter prestígio, ser temido. Para isso é preciso agir rápido à medida que as infrações ocorram. A superioridade numérica isolada não confere vantagem, mas a determinação de um líder sim. A energia deste, será fundamental para a vitória, mas não se trata uma energia cósmica ou religiosa, e sim da vontade de agir e conseguir conquistar objetivos. Seus princípios podem ser aplicados, por indivíduos no confronto com seus oponentes, exércitos contra exércitos e empresas contra suas concorrentes. Embora não se saiba ao certo se Sun Tzu existiu ou é uma figura lendária, os escritos são de Se-Ma Ts´ien, do século I a.C. e a tradução do padre Amiot é a primeira versão que se conhece no Ocidente.
  • (2/5)
    Pretty dull going, even by audiobook. The narrators were great, though, and there were times that the footnotes saved me.
  • (3/5)
    Inspiration comes from many places and The Art of War is one of those books mentioned frequently in my circles. It's one of those books I've been meaning to get to for years and, while I am not sorry that I finally got to it, its usefulness to me is limited.Most of the non-strategic advice is good leadership advice. Things such as being a leader means setting the standard for how the work should be done, including getting one's hands dirty with the lowliest tasks. I've read plenty of stuff about leadership, and setting the example, that there really wasn't anything new for me here.Since I'm not interested in military strategies, the rest was dry.From a strictly historic perspective, I can understand the importance of this treatise. But as an outstanding example of leadership and strategy in the 21st century? I'm not seeing it.
  • (5/5)
    I give it a 5 because it's a classic that you can read in under an hour. One of the best books I have read. Simple, basic, and a great strategy foundation. I refer to it all the time. Great book from a historical standpoint, but certainly is a great asset in business.
  • (4/5)
    A classic that is as valuable for war strategies as it is for work and everyday relations.My edition is from Shambhala, and translated by Thomas Cleary (famed for his translations of Miyamoto Musashi's work, as well as his biography).In this edition, each of the passages is interpreted by 11 different people (from Li Quan to Zhang Yu), for scope and perspective. While it's not necessary to include so many interpreters, I find that the different perspectives (and wording) sometimes made Master Sun's wisdoms clearer.
  • (5/5)
    The oldest military treatise on war. This one is Tops! Translation by Lionel Giles and with original Chinese.
  • (5/5)
    A great translation. That was meant to be funny since I don't read Chinese and can't possibly really know how good his translation is. However, this is a great book and belongs right next to your other war strategy greats.
  • (4/5)
    I think one of the reasons why this book has been and probably always will be so popular, is that many different people can read read it for many different reasons. Among the most obvious: some people read it to learn about war (like Tom Ricks, who quotes it in his famous book about Iraq), some people are drawn into it by an interest in the Far East (like the translator, M. Giles himself, who was a student of all things Chinese), and some people just like it because it's really really old and really really cool, and I guess that's part of the reason why I like it. And although the German wrote another famous-book about war, he was, being German, boring. But then, some things can be both popular, and well-reasoned, and, as a philosophical essay to discover the nature of war, this little book does a fine job. Recall what Aristotle says in the first sentence of his 'Nicomachean Ethics': "Every art...seems to aim at some good, and so it has been well said that the good is that at which everything aims." So, what good does The Art Of War aim at? (Absolutely nothin'--ugh! Well, no, sorry.) Well, in a way, the art of war aims to conduct war well, just as the art of baking bread aims to bake bread well. But what does that mean, in real terms? I think that if we examine the thought of Master Sun, we find that the good at which the art of war aims is to achieve victory, not by inflicting the maximum amount of destruction, but by causing the absolute minimum: for to cause much destruction is not so good. And I think he does all that with a certain sort of style, too: "II. Waging War 3. Again, if the campaign be protracted, the resources of the State will not be equal to the strain. 5. Thus, though we have heard of stupid haste in war, cleverness has never been seen associated with long delays. 6. There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare. 7. It is only one who is thoroughly acquainted with the evils of war that can thoroughly understand the profitable way of carrying it on. 8. The skilful soldier does not raise a second levy, neither are his suppy-wagons loaded more than twice. 19. In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns." And it's good to remind all those annoying, noisy military history fanatics that the longest, most destructive wars are the *worst*, because people *die* and things get *destroyed* and that's *bad*. (8/10)
  • (5/5)
    The Art of War is a treasure trove of information...if you study war, ancient China, Strategy, or military history...it is useless when applied to business, I think. I love this text, but I study ancient Asian texts. Giles' translation is the one which all others are measured and it has the text with commentary and without, and in the original Chinese. As a study text this is superb, as a manual for business, it a weak application.Miso
  • (5/5)
    one of the best books I've ever read; just be careful of the translator. There are some really horrendous editions out there. ALWAYS buy the one translated by "CLEARLY" he is very profound in eastern philosophy and tradition
  • (4/5)
    It is a really old book, but still has much application to everyday life in modern times. The book is a little hard to read at times. However, the knowledge you get from reading it worth it. I recommend everyone read this title at least once in their lifetime.
  • (1/5)
    This book counts as classic even for modern warfare and strategy games. My experience has been unsatisfying and boring - perhaps I didn't delve into deep implications of obvious sounding tactics.
  • (4/5)
    A classic! Well worth the read, and looking forward to reading again in the future.
  • (3/5)
    Another translation (Ralph Sawyer) and lots of background history & hints of textual analysis - but fails to grab.Read July 2006
  • (3/5)
    A little book full off great thoughts and advice for life. I read it every year.
  • (5/5)
    I have read this several times in a variety of translations. This version is formatted like a poem and is a quick read. Interesting that Sun Tzu echoes many of the issues raised by Thucydides. I remember an Instructor Gunnery during my Regimental Officers Basic Course from the United States artillery beginning every lesson with: "Sun Tzu says...". And, "If a 155 round lands on a tank, the tank is toast". So much in such a short book and it was quite possibly written before Thucydides was born.
  • (5/5)
    Quite possibly the most influential book on military tactics of all time. I was incredibly surprised by its brevity. A must-read for any historian. 
  • (4/5)
    A very quick read of a classic. I had always been meaning to get around to this book, and I did not realize how short it was. The version I have contains more commentary than the actual writing, and I did not bother with the commentary.

    The book is basically a series of maxims that describe how to lead as a general at war. I think its appeal is universal, and many of the ideas can be applied as strategic thinking in other aspects of life. I don't think it was all that profound, but then again, its ideas have been used for centuries. It was nice to be able to read where a lot of them came from.
  • (2/5)
    This is a manual and reads like one. Better to take in very small doses, digest and discuss rather than to read continuously.
  • (5/5)
    A subtle and fascinating philosophy on how to wage war. Knowledge of assured victory is key for Sun Tzu. At once it is esoteric and simple giving the reader the opportunity to find new angles and places to learn with each repeated reading. Intense and interesting. (Shambhala translation)
  • (2/5)
    An interesting book, written with just short quips of information but it still seemed to flow rather seamlessly. A decent book with some good info, some of it could be still used today some of it would obviously not apply anymore to today's wars. A good read, enjoyable, and really quick.
  • (2/5)
    If you're already self-actualized (read: me), this is nothing but a bunch of shih.
  • (3/5)
    Classic, brilliant techniques put so simply. Yet, naturally, reading this as a modern day civilian, I applied it to my modern day battles such as in business, relationships, Los Angeles traffic...the typical. As a naturally paranoid person, I feel it did me more harm than good. In addition, I prefer to (perhaps ignorantly) avoid seeing things as if they are wars. Some things will never change though because I will always act shy and giggle right before I slaughter my enemy.