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A Day and a Life

Bewertungen:
4/5 (29 Bewertungen)
Länge:
249 Seiten
4 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 17, 2016
ISBN:
9781782642015
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

The monastic rhythm of life at St Alcuins means that all is peaceful on the surface, but beneath there are strong currents as each monk contends with his own hopes, fears, challenges, and temptations. Not every monk is settled and secure. Sadness permeates the monastery when it is discovered early one morning that one of the novices, Brother Cedd, has disappeared. It quickly becomes clear that disturbance in the life of one can impact many. As the day goes on, the question looms: will Brother Cedd return? And what will be the consequences if he doesn't? In this moving conclusion to The Hawk and the Dove series, Pen Wilcock describes a single day in the life of the community weaving a deeply touching, frank, and witty tapestry of monastic life.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 17, 2016
ISBN:
9781782642015
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Pen Wilcock lives in Hastings, in England's East Sussex. Her books explore the Christian faith in both fiction and non-fiction, and are all written with the intention of deepening faith in the reader, and making the Lord Jesus known and loved. A former Methodist minister and school and hospice chaplain, she writes a monthly column for Woman Alive and a popular blog, Kindred of the Quiet Way. She is author of more than 20 books.


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4.1
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  • (5/5)
    Title: A Day and a Life (The Hawk & the Dove #9)Author: Penelope WilcockPages: 221Year: 2016Publisher: Lion FictionMy rating is 5 stars.Brother Cedd has gone missing. He is a novitiate; therefore, he has not taken his final vows to become a monk. One morning it is discovered that he has left without leaving word of where he is going or when or if he will return. Brother Clement is devastated as his eyesight is failing and he has come to depend on Brother Cedd to eventually take over his position in the scriptorium. Brother Theodore is worried that he has lost a novitiate from monastic life and that Brother Cedd has returned to the world. Abbot John is concerned as well that he has lost one of his sheep so to speak. Brother Thomas is sent by Abbot John to William de Bulmer’s home with supplies to help see him and his wife through the upcoming winter. When Thomas arrives, he is surprised at what he finds.Brother Cedd has been struggling with feeling insignificant and that he has nothing worthwhile to contribute to the monastic community. He has wanted to be a monk his whole life, but now that he has experienced that life with other monks and seen that each of them have a job and contribute to the fellowship and life of their small community; he wonders what he can give. He has no special skills; he doesn’t have wit; he isn’t particularly smart. Has he truly been called to be a monk? God places people in Brother Cedd’s path to guide him, but He leaves it up to Brother Cedd to choose the direction.As I began reading this final book in this wonderful series, it was with fondness and sadness. Fondness in revisiting with old friends I have come to know over the life of the series in each book and sadness that this will be the last visit to St. Alcuin’s. This book focuses on one day in the life of the monastery and one life as lived by the inhabitants of St. Alcuin’s. The series contains truth for the spiritual life as well as for the life here on earth, even though it is a work of fiction. Our main source of truth should always be the Bible, but this series depicts human frailties and struggles in how to deal with living in a community, being individuals as well as united, the idiosyncrasies of people, their bad habits, their opinions, their mercy, their grace and compassion, their love for one another and living a Christ-like life. I have treasured each book in the series and recommend them to all to keep for generations.Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255. “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
  • (5/5)
    This is a lovely book that describes one day in the life of a 14th century monastery from the point of view of individual monks who are at different points in their life: a brand new postulant, a novice monk, the abbot and various monks with specific duties in the monastery. In addition to giving a good description of what it would have been like to be a medieval monk, you really get to know the individuals and their joys and difficulties. Although this is the last in a series, and I have not read the previous book, I did not feel this to be a disadvantage. In addition, though the book appears to be aimed at a Christian audience (in several places the monks discuss the theology behind the monastic life), and I am not a Christian, I also did not feel this was a disadvantage, as it gives the reader an insight into the thinking of a medieval monk. All in all, I think anyone who is interested in getting insight into the monastic life of the middle ages, or just is interested in the thoughts of men who chose that life, and its appeal and challenges, would enjoy this book. It is also beautifully written and a pleasure to read.
  • (5/5)
    This book is, as the title suggests, a day in the life of a 14th Century monastery. Woven through that day with the rhythm of monastic life are the characters, thoughts and troubles of the monks. But this day Brother Cedd has disappeared.Fourteenth century monastic life is not my usual interest, but this book is fascinating - perhaps if monastic life had been taught like this during ministerial training I might have been more engaged with it!This book offers observations of life lived in community. There are biblical reflections and some real laugh out loud anecdotes woven throughout.This is an interesting story incorporating lots of wisdom and sense, both spiritual and for all of life.
  • (3/5)
    I feel that I'm at a bit of a disadvantage in reviewing this book as its the ninth in a series and I haven't read the other eight.It describes a day in the life of a fourteenth century monastery as the monks go through their prayers, routines and lives. Several aspects of the book were very good. I was impressed with the discussions of how the small irritations of life which would otherwise be ignorable become matters for huge tension in a community - the fact that someone eats noisily is nothing really, but if you have to sit next to that person every meal for your life it becomes a matter that stirs you hugely.The relationships and friendships between the monks was also very interesting.The only draw back was that the novel was at times quite 'preachy'. There were explanations and discussions of things that were unnecessary and seemed to demonstrate that the author was more interested in converting lost souls then the flow of the book.
  • (5/5)
    While many readers might hesitate to pick up the ninth book in a series, this story holds up as a read-alone. Admittedly, there are a few choice details thrown in to satisfy loyal series readers who have follow her saga of the monks at St Alcuin's monastery in Yorkshire during Chaucerian times from earlier installments.Fans of Kathleen Norris' Cloister Walk, will find similar themes centering around the very human struggles of those in religious community. In this fictional account, Wilcock skillfully weaves the inner worlds and viewpoints of multiple characters - the abbot, a runaway novice, a married former brother, a cook, a terrible chess player, a harried sacristan and many others – over the period of a monastic day. The most compelling reason to read A Day and a Life, however, is to experience the gentle drama of the inner struggles of the characters. As young Colin, who is about to join the brothers, puts it, “He had come to see what makes Saint Alcuin's such a special place to be is a mix of respect and kindness, a practical compassion that goes gently in dealing with a man's ordinary frailty, clothing him with dignity again and again ...” To spend a day with the brothers is like pouring soothing salve on a sunburned soul. I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Monks always seem so perfect and devoted to their beliefs and practices. As if they were naturally born to step into the role. Ms. Wilcock delves deeply into the emotions and experiences of 2 young men that believe they have received this calling. As they become more and more a part of the daily life of the monastery they feel they do not measure up to the older more experienced brothers. They begin to be overcome with uncertainties and misgivings about their ability to truly serve in this capacity.As they observe and learn they see that all the brothers have faults and weaknesses and many of passed through the same doubts and troubles. The author shows that people are people with their own personalities and character flaws not matter who they are or what they do.The descriptiveness and detail of the daily live in St.Alcuin’s is fascinating. No detail goes unnoticed. What I felt made it even more interesting was the setting of the story in the 15th century.I did feel at times there was so much description that the story line was lost and bogged down. These sections were too wordy which made me have to push on to the next par.A very interesting book.I received this book from Kregel Publications in exchange for an honest review. The opinions I have stated are my own.
  • (5/5)
    I have loved all of the books in Penelope Wilcock’s The Hawk And The Dove series and am sad that the time visiting with the monks of St. Alcuin’s has come to an end. I actually missed 2 books in the series, so I can dive into those, but when I finish with them, I’ll have to reread. And this series is one that definitely begs a rereading. A Day And A Life, book 9, draws all the threads together from previous books and weaves a story of faithfulness and community. A perfect ending to a lovely series.St. Alcuin’s is a monastery located in Yorkshire during the 15th century. Although though they have contact with the outside world through tenants, pilgrims and benefactors, the monks live a mostly contained life, a life dedicated to prayer, work and service to others. Through varying perspectives the life and lives of the monks are, well, brought to life :)! I loved that Wilcock explores not only the brothers’ outward actions, but their inward thoughts, thoughts that are funny, poignant and extremely human. From a lowly postulant, a novice, seasoned brothers, and the abbot, a picture of what it means to have true fellowship emerges. From the reaches of time comes a story that is more relevant for today’s Christian than may be first expected. The monks struggle with frustrations, self-centeredness, loneliness and fear of the future. An overarching theme of belonging to a larger family — the family of God — is woven throughout the book. There is also the theme of bearing with one another examplified with an amusing dinner scene.Fans of The Hawk And The Dove series will be very pleased with this finale. If you haven’t read any of the books in this excellent series, you are in for a real treat. Start at the beginning and dig in!Highly Recommended!Audience: adults.(Thanks to Kregel and Lion Hudson for a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)
  • (3/5)
    An interesting look at what it takes to run a monastery and the crises of faith that even the most devoted people can face.
  • (3/5)
    This book is the third and last in a series about a group of monks in the middle ages. I have not read the first two, so it took me a while to catch on to some of the Catholic lingo, and to try to keep the many monks in the monastery straight. The gist of the book (which takes place in one day) is that one of the novice monks has had second thoughts about the life he has chosen, and has disappeared. Will he return? That's the whole story in a nutshell. Not very exciting, yet the author has written sweetly about the different parts of the day and has given a snapshot of the challenges facing the monks. They struggle with the restrictions in a very human way (hating to stop and leave the farming work for a prayer time, for instance), and the setting is charmingly described. In the back of the book is a glossary of terms which I wish had been in the front of the book. I didn't realize until the end that I could have referred to that glossary to find out what terms like "Compline" means. Also, there is some bible quoting in the book, but it doesn't overwhelm the story. If you are looking for a quick read with a mild plot and a feel-good Christian bent, you might check this one out.
  • (3/5)
    This book is okay. Of course, I did compare it with the Cadfael Series about Monks and mysteries too. This one is rather too slow and plodding with a lot of detail. It was interesting to get to know about life in a medieval Monastery but the plot storyline was a little too thin for my liking.
  • (4/5)
    This is Book Nine in the Hawk and Dove series by Penelope Wilcock. Set in a monastery, the story line follows the lives of the monks who are members of the monastic community. The duties, concerns, and characteristics of each monk are described and considered, and are set within the ebb and flow of the daily "hours" of praise and prayer in the monastery. However, the thread that runs through the book is the concern for a missing brother, a young member who is not yet professed. The reason for his going missing and how this issue is solved reveal the only too human fears and failings of human beings. The "day" of the title refers to the journey through a monastic day. The "life" refers to the life of the young missing brother. I will tell how it ends, so as to avoid a "spoiler" here. I enjoyed this book as much as the others in this series. I received this book as an Early Reviewer title.
  • (5/5)
    A glorious, triumphant ending to the marvelous Hawk & the Dove series concerning the thirty-one monks of St. Alcuin's Benedictine Abbey, in 14th century Yorkshire. We follow a day in the life of the abbot, professed monks, novices and a postulant, seeing things through their eyes. We are exposed to their inner feelings: doubts and joys. We follow each as he fulfils his obedience for the day: from farm and garden chores, laundry, scriptorium and illumination of manuscripts, candle-making, to the all-important canonical hours from Lauds [service in the middle of the night] to Compline [evening prayer], as well as private prayer. We sit in on lessons for the novitiate and a choir rehearsal. This gentle, often poignant work, with much Scriptural and pastoral advice I feel will become a spiritual classic one day. I think the author has ended on just the right note. I will miss these old friends. Most highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    A look into the lives and thoughts of a group of monks at the St. Alcuin monastery in early England. The author shifts between the various characters as they go about their daily tasks and gives the reader an excellent sense of how each man has an effect on the other members of the community. The best word I can find to describe this story is peaceful. The writing style is calming and there are not as many altrications in this, the conclusion to the series, as occurred in earlier volumes. And yet, so much is transpiring that it is difficult to believe it all takes place in a day. A recommended read to escape from the ugly side of humanity into a world of spirituality, forgiveness, and faith.
  • (5/5)
    This is the 9th and last novel in The Hawk and The Dove series. Wilcock did an excellent job of wrapping up the series by writing a book that reflects a day in the life of the 15th century monastery I've read so much about. There is a small bit of action, but the gentleness of the day reflected in the writing goes far in portraying what a real day must have been like. I know that there is no reason to have another book, that life will go on, there will be problems to handle, and their faith will prevail in the end.