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Der Sandmann

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Der Sandmann

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (7 Bewertungen)
Länge:
51 Seiten
42 Minuten
Freigegeben:
29. Juni 2018
ISBN:
9783964547217
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Hoffmanns 1816 erschienene Erzählung "Der Sandmann" handelt von dem jungen Studenten Nathanael, der sich, vorbelastet durch ein Kindheitstrauma, in den Automatenmenschen Olimpia verliebt, letztlich dem Wahnsinn verfällt und sich das Leben nimmt. Hoffmanns Erzählung gilt als Kunstmärchen der Schwarzen Romantik und zählt zu seinen bedeutendsten Werken. Aufgebaut ist der sogenannte Schauerroman in drei Briefe, ein erster von Nathanael an Lothar, den Bruder seiner Verlobten Clara, ein zweiter von Clara an Nathanael und wiederum einer von Nathanael an Lothar. Im Anschluss an die Briefe wendet sich ein fiktiver Erzähler direkt an die Leser und berichtet vom Fortgang des Geschehens.
Freigegeben:
29. Juni 2018
ISBN:
9783964547217
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor



Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Der Sandmann denken

3.7
7 Bewertungen / 7 Rezensionen
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Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    The Sandman was originally published in 1816. I read the book through the Serial Reader App. Because this is a short story, I think I would have enjoyed it better reading it all in one sitting, rather than broken up into seven sections. Still, there was much creepiness in the story.

    The opening finds Nathanael remembering an incident from his childhood, when a terrifying figure he called the Sandman would come to visit his house. Years later, when Nathanael is away at University, he runs into a man he thinks is the Sandman, in disguise. Nathanael begins to doubt his own sanity as he tries to find out what is happening.

    I am not an expert in the literature of the early 1800's, but I thought the plot of the story seemed fairly modern. Especially the introduction of an automaton. I enjoyed portions of this, while I thought other portions dragged a bit. The style was a little overwrought for my tastes.
  • (4/5)
    Nathanael’s childhood is haunted by the mysterious figure of Coppelius, a lawyer-friend of his father who regularly turns up at their house for night-time alchemical sessions. Nathanael associates Coppelius with the mythical Sandman, the legendary being said to steal the eyes of children who refuse to go to sleep. When Nathanael’s father dies as a result of an experiment gone wrong, this ominous mental link is sealed once and for all. Years later, with Nathanael now a university student, unwelcome memories are reawakened by the arrival in town of Italian barometer salesman Coppola. Could he be Coppelius under an assumed name? And what is his association with Professor Spalanzani? Nathanael’s ruminations increasingly skirt obsession. His infatuation with Olimpia, Spalanzani’s perfectly-formed but strangely uncommunicative daughter, only adds to his emotional confusion. I have the impression that continental Gothic tends to be more earnest and intense than English Gothic. No doubt this is a generalisation which invites any number of exceptions. However, it is certainly true of E.T.A. Hoffmann’s The Sandman (1816). Almost unremittingly dark, its bleakness is only tempered, if at all, by occasional bursts of black humour. The plot is underpinned by vague aura of supernatural dread, although from the start there is a strong suggestion that this is a tale not of ghosts or monsters but of a very human madness which may be more terrifying than any phantom.A classic of its kind, The Sandman has inspired later authors including Poe and composers including Delibes and Offenbach. This annotated Alma Classics edition features a new translation by Christopher Moncrieff and includes in an Appendix a few pages from Sigmund Freud’s The Uncanny – a celebrated essay which gives a predictably psycho-sexual interpretation of Hoffmann’s text.
  • (4/5)
    About the title story only...

    E.T.A. HOFFMANN, The Sandman
    (1816).

    Remarkably modern-feeling in theme, probably because lately we've had quite a few writers harking back to this kind of story. The sinister traveling merchant Coppelius/Coppola, selling his 'eyes-a' is reflected in “Ilse, Who Saw Clearly” by E. Lily Yu, for example. And of course, the whole steampunk genre loves to explore the idea of clockwork automata.
    To a modern reader, the structure of the story flows a bit oddly and unevenly, and the language is quite overwrought (although this may be an artifact of translation [?]) - but its careful ambiguity and depiction of a decline into madness are effectively done. I was familiar with the plotline of the ballet, Coppélia, which was based on this story - but the original tale is far, far darker.
  • (3/5)
    I found "The Sandman" a little trippy to read. Nathanael, the so called hero" comes across as a neurotic man, who has had a traumatic childhood, what with his grandmother scaring him with tales of the Sandman sprinkling sand in his eyes and then stealing them and the murder of his father. These events take root in him and setup what happens when Nathanael becomes an adult. From a psychological viewport it's hard to know if Nathaneal is perfectly sane or is already insane from the outset of the story. The disjointed structure of the narrative lends itself to this viewpoint as it could be said to represent Nathanael's mindset. The story is a quick read and holds together well for a two hundred year old tale.
  • (4/5)
    A classic gothic supernatural short story about a childhood monster and a doll came to life.
  • (4/5)
    Ein Klassiker, den ich damals in der Schule verschmäht have, jetzt aber zum Glück nachholen und geniessen konnte. Düster, romantisch und wegbereitend.
  • (4/5)
    Out of the mists of history, translated from German, and told in a style no longer in existence, comes a chilling sci-fi tale. I don’t know the connections, but this has similarities to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, published the same year. It deals with artificial intelligence, and with the devil. I found it referred to in Gods and Robots by Adriene Mayor when she was talking about the “uncanny valley” response phenomenon dealing with constructing robots that are “too lifelike.” There is an unforgettable scene in the middle where an optician, the devil, eyeballs, and spectacles torment the hapless main character. An update to this story would make a great Twilight Zone episode.