Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Vorschau lesen

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Bewertungen:
4/5 (4,591 Bewertungen)
Länge:
373 Seiten
3 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jun 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781411431737
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

&&LDIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LDIV&&R&&LI&&RAlice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass&&L/I&&R, by &&LSTRONG&&RLewis Carroll&&L/B&&R, is part of the &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&R&&LI&&R &&L/I&&Rseries, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&R: &&LDIV&&R
  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. &&LI&&RBarnes & Noble Classics &&L/I&&Rpulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.&&L/DIV&&R&&L/DIV&&R&&LP style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"&&R &&L/P&&R&&LP style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"&&RFirst published in 1865, &&LSTRONG&&RLewis Carroll&&L/B&&R’s &&LI&&RAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland&&L/I&&R was an immediate success, as was its sequel, &&LI&&RThrough the Looking-Glass&&L/I&&R. Carroll’s sense of the absurd and his amazing gift for games of logic and language have secured for the Alice books an enduring spot in the hearts of both adults and children.&&L/P&&R&&LP style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"&&R &&L/P&&R&&LP style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"&&RAlice begins her adventures when she follows the frantically delayed White Rabbit down a hole into the magical world of Wonderland, where she meets a variety of wonderful creatures, including Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the Cheshire Cat, the hookah-smoking Caterpillar, the Mad Hatter, and the Queen of Hearts—who, with the help of her enchanted deck of playing cards, tricks Alice into playing a bizarre game of croquet.  Alice continues her adventures in Through the Looking-Glass, which is loosely based on a game of chess and includes Carroll’s famous poem “Jabberwocky.”&&L/P&&R&&LP style
Freigegeben:
Jun 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781411431737
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has delighted and entranced children for over a hundred years. Lewis Carroll was the pen-name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. Born in 1832, he studied at Christ Church College, Oxford where he became a mathematics lecturer. The Alice stories were originally written for Alice Liddell, the daughter of the dean of his college


Ähnlich wie Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Mehr lesen von Lewis Carroll

Ähnliche Bücher

Ähnliche Artikel

Verwandte Kategorien

Buchvorschau

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) - Lewis Carroll

Introduction

BOREDOM AND NONSENSE IN WONDERLAND

What do you suppose is the use of a child without any meaning? (p. 253)

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There pursue what lies beyond and down rabbit holes and on reverse sides of mirrors. But mainly their subject is what comes after, and in this sense the books are allegories about what a child can know and come to know. This quest, as in many great works of literature, unwinds against a larger backdrop: what can and what cannot be known at a particular historical moment, a moment that in Lewis Carroll’s case preceded both Freud’s speculations on the unconscious and Heisenberg’s formulation of the uncertainty principle. Yet because the books were written by a teacher of mathematics who was also a reverend, they are also concerned with what can and cannot be taught to a child who has an infinite faith in the goodness and good sense of the world. But Alice’s quest for knowledge, her desire to become something (a grown-up) she is not, is inverted. The books are not conventional quest romances in which Alice matures, overcomes obstacles, and eventually gains wisdom. For when Alice arrives in Wonderland, she is already the most reasonable creature there. She is wiser than any lesson books are able to teach her to be. More important, she is eminently more reasonable than her own feelings will allow her to express. What comes after for Alice? Near the end of Through the Looking-Glass, the White Queen tells Alice, Something’s going to happen! (p. 265).

Quests for mastery are continually frustrated in the Alice books. In comparison with the ever-sane Alice, it is the various Wonderland creatures who appear to be ridiculous, coiners of abstract word games. Yet Carroll also frustrates, with equal precision, Alice’s more reasonable human desires. Why, after all, cannot Alice know why the Mad Hatter is mad? Or why will Alice never get to 20 in her multiplication tables? In Carroll, the logic of mathematical proofs runs counter to the logic of reasonable human desire—and neither logic is easily mastered. To his radical epistemological doubt, Carroll added a healthy dose of skepticism for the conventional children’s story—a story that in his day came packaged with a moral aim and treated the child as an innocent or tabula rasa upon which the morals and knowledge of the adult could be tidily imprinted.

Alice embodies an idea Freud would later develop at length: What Alice the child already knows, the adult has yet to learn. Or to be more precise, what Alice has not yet forgotten, the adult has yet to remember as something that is by nature unforgettable. In other words, in Alice childhood fantasy meets the reality of adulthood, which to the child looks as unreal and unreasonable as a Cheshire Cat’s grin or a Queen who yells Off with her head! But even as she calls adult reality unreal, Alice, as the most reasonable creature in her unreasonable dreams, doesn’t quite yet realize that the adult’s sense of reality has already taken up residence in her. The principal dream of most children—the dream within the dream, as it were—is the dream of not dreaming any longer, the dream of growing up. For the adult, the outlook is reversed. The adult’s quest is an inverted one: to find those desires again, in more reasonable forms—and this involves forgetting the original childhood desires (to become an adult) in order to remember them as an adult. The psychoanalyst Adam Phillips notes: Freud is not really saying that we are really children, but that the sensual intensities of childhood cannot be abolished, that our ideals are transformed versions of childhood pleasures. Looking forward . . . is a paradoxical form of looking back. The future is where one retrieves the pleasures, the bodily pleasures of the past.¹ The Alice books manage to show both these quests—that of the child to look forward, and of the adult to look back—simultaneously, as mirror logics of each other.

Like both Freud and the surrealists, Carroll implicitly understood that a child’s emotions and desires appear omnipotent and boundless to the child—and thus make the adult’s forgetting of them difficult if not illogical. Growing up poses psychological and logical absurdities. The quandary of a logically grounded knowledge constituted out of an illogical universe pervades both books. The questions that Alice asks are not answered by the animals in Wonderland nor by anyone after she wakens. It is likely that her questions don’t have answers or that there are no right questions to ask. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass remain the most prophetic of the nineteenth century’s anti-narratives, inverted quest romances, circular mathematical treatises on the illogical logic of forgetting one’s desires. They display a logic that the child must master in order to grow up. As the White Queen remarks of the Red Queen: "She’s in that state of mind . . . that she wants to deny something—only she doesn’t know what to deny!" (p. 254).

For the child, the future lies undeniably beyond her (in a world of ever more sophisticated language skills), whereas for the adult, the future is something she must remember to return to. Carroll seems to be saying that children, in their rush to grow up, can pretend to be adults too soon; and adults can also, in a very different kind of game, forget how to be children—that is, forget the sensual, even nonsensical desires of childhood, which endure in language as in life. It is not surprising that children love puns and riddles, just as kings and oracles do. Carroll’s books of words and pictures, puns and riddles, indefinitely prolong the time of childhood nonsense. Carroll’s Alice books have a moral nonetheless: Like childhood, they end. And yet both books, which end with measured recollection and memory, seem to continue into the future.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was published in 1865; Through the Looking-Glass appeared six years later in 1871. The first of the books began as an oral tale, told on a rowboat expedition up the Thames on a golden afternoon, most likely July 4, 1862. The party in the boat included Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (the mathematician, logician, and photographer who had already created the storytelling pen name Lewis Carroll), his friend the Reverend Robinson Duckworth, and the three Liddell sisters: Alice, who was ten; Lorina Charlotte, who was thirteen; and Edith, who was eight. Carroll was thirty at the time and had been ordained as a deacon the year before. Hardly a recluse, he enjoyed traveling, frequented the theater, took pleasure in giving un-birthday presents on any day of the year, wrote a large number of letters, invented mathematical puzzles, and was an avid amateur photographer who liked making up pictures,² often composing his subjects in tableau-like settings that suggested make-believe stories. His sitters included Tennyson, Ruskin, the Rossettis, Millais, Queen Victoria’s son, Prince Leopold—as well as his favorite subject: Victorian children, particularly young girls. He gained First Class Honours in mathematics and produced a number of treatises on mathematics and symbolic logic, beginning with A Syllabus of Plane Geometry, which appeared in 1860. He was a polymath, albeit a conservative one. He considered Tuesday his lucky day.

The boat trip on that July day covered about three miles. The story that would become Alice, according to Carroll, was extemporized as they went along that day and over several subsequent trips. Carroll remembers how, in a desperate attempt to strike out some new line of fairy-lore, he sent Alice straight down a rabbit-hole, to begin with, without the least idea what was to happen afterwards.³ On one boat trip, Carroll tried to amuse the girls with a game but was forced to "go on with my interminable fairy-tale of Alice’s Adventures."⁴ With some prompting by Alice Liddell, Carroll began penning the story he initially called Alice’s Adventures Under Ground. For reasons that are not clear, Carroll was banned from the Liddell household before completing the book, making the Alice books very much about a child as absent muse rather than as recipient of either of the books. The book—the title now changed to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland—was published on July 4, 1865, to commemorate the date of that first boating expedition.

Despite their differences, both books chronicle the adventures of a girl named Alice, modeled on Alice Liddell, whose father was the dean of Christ Church, Oxford, where Carroll taught. Carroll first came to Christ Church in 1850. He stayed for nearly fifty years. During that time, Dean Liddell was busy attempting to modernize the college, turning it from a kind of genteel seminary into something more like a German university, a process Carroll resisted in characteristic fashion: He produced a series of comic pamphlets in protest. However, he was made a don after only five years, a feat remarkable even then. Carroll met Alice in 1856, when she was four. From that time onward, Carroll took a number of photographs of Alice and her siblings. Both Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass begin with Alice on the verge of dreaming, but the books transpire in different seasons and evoke different moods.

Alice commences on a warm spring day, while Through the Looking-Glass is set in midwinter. The looking glass—as an analogue for the confusion of things that are knowable—was probably a relatively late addition by Carroll, added at a time when, according to Alice Liddell, the three sisters were themselves learning to play chess and Carroll was entertaining all three with stories about chess playing, among other things. The initial appearance of the looking glass was prompted by Carroll’s meeting with another young Alice, his cousin Alice Raikes, most likely in August 1868. In his biography of Carroll, Derek Hudson recounts the following incident:

The room they entered had a tall mirror standing in one corner. [Carroll] gave his cousin an orange and asked her which hand she held it in. When she replied ‘The right,’ he asked her to stand before the glass and tell him in which hand the little girl in the mirror was holding it. ‘The left hand’, came the puzzled reply. ‘Exactly,’ said [Carroll], ‘and how do you explain that?’ . . . ‘If I was on the other side of the glass,’ [Alice] said, ‘wouldn’t the orange still be in my right hand?’ . . . ‘Well done, little Alice,’ [Carroll] said. ‘The best answer I’ve had yet.’

Carroll completed work on the sequel quickly; a manuscript entitled Behind the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Saw There was posted to Macmil lan in January 1869. It appeared, with its present title, in time for Christmas 1871, though its publication date reads 1872. The book was a wild success, selling out its initial print run of 9,000 copies almost immediately. By 1893 it had sold 60,000 copies.

TAMING CHANCE VS. ENDING BOREDOM

I can’t remember things before they happen. (p. 204)

Can you row? the Sheep asked, handing her a pair of knitting-needles as she spoke.

Yes, a little—but not on land—and not with needles— Alice was beginning to say. (p. 209)

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland began as an oral tale told by Lewis Carroll to the three Liddell sisters, although it is often forgotten that Carroll’s fantasia of reading and upside-down geography lessons begins with a book, and specifically the aversion to reading one. In the first chapter, Alice, bored to tears and sitting on a river bank, peeks at and then turns away from her sister’s book because it lacks pictures or conversations (p. 13). She thinks to make a daisy chain, thus taking charge of her own boredom by ending it. Of course, Alice never does make herself a daisy chain, and in this she implicitly acknowledges that it may not be enough to want to end boredom to bring it to an end. It might be more accurate to say that boredom is ended for her by something she cannot entirely provide by herself. Not surprisingly, Alice’s dream, like the landscape of Wonderland itself, feels both expansive and boxed in, wonderfully curious and frustratingly opaque, an imaginary landscape that is located under as opposed to above ground.

For a child, boredom may be the biggest non-event or riddle to solve because its solution must come from without—while seeming to come from within. As Walter Benjamin wrote, We are bored when we don’t know what we are waiting for.⁶ Like the various creatures in Wonderland, boredom is a curious riddle of wanting something to want. Like a good many acceptable neuroses, boredom is indeterminate. It resists analysis. Not surprisingly, when Alice first sees the Rabbit she answers as any bored child might: "There was nothing so very remarkable in that" (p. 13). As the psychoanalyst Adam Phillips suggests, it may be a pedagogical and therapeutic mistake (Alice in Wonderland is filled with both) to try to cure boredom.⁷

If boredom is difficult to dispel, the boredom all children feel is not easily tolerated by adults, who insist that children have things to do, that they have interests. The field of symbolic logic and the adult’s attempts to eradicate boredom turn out to be equally coercive. Alice’s English and her manners are corrected relentlessly. Alice is bossed about: The rabbit orders her to fetch his handkerchief, a note on a bottle enjoins her to drink me, the caterpillar demands that she explain herself, the Queen summons her to play croquet. The result of such coercion is generally terror followed by tears, and there is much crying in Alice in Wonderland. Nearly all the players in Wonderland, with the exception of the Duchess and the Queen, are male, older than Alice, and contentious, imperious, or condescending in their adherence to strict rules. Even in play, logic reigns rigidly in Wonderland in a kind of spoof of the analytical philosophical logic popular at Oxford in Carroll’s day. One of the dangers in ending a child’s boredom is that the adult’s gesture will be, like a bad psychoanalytic session, too coercive, a kind of monstrous bestiary of loud-mouthed creatures and half-human authority figures—like Humpty Dumpty and a tyrannical Queen whose favorite line is Off with her head! What is Alice to do with other people’s wishes, other people’s logical desires? As Humpty Dumpty puts it, The question is . . . which is to be master—that’s all (p. 219).

Lewis Carroll was a teacher of symbolic logic at Oxford, and he loved to make mathematical knots for his pupils to wriggle out of. Carroll’s fondness for mathematical puzzles and classical logic admits of both the curious and trivial. He found logical problems and amusements in port prices, postal calculations, even lawn tennis. In 1883 he published a pamphlet, Lawn Tennis Tournaments, in which he proved, logically of course, that a player who lost in the first round might find that the finalist was an inferior player to herself. The lessons in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland are clever impositions upon the logic, which is to say the reasonableness, of a child. Over the course of the two books, what might at first appear to the child as boring lessons in geography, anatomy, botany, astronomy, linguistics, geology (What volcano? [p. 161]), physics, and mathematics are transformed into the form most favored by oracles, kings, and children—riddles: Are flowers alive? Can a kitten play chess? Is saying what one means the same as meaning what one says? Is looking-glass milk good to drink? Both books commence with things that cannot be known, and both are thus about the curiosity and the desires provoked by unnamed somethings. In Alice, such somethings take the form of riddle-like creatures like Cheshire cats without bodies and rabbits with pocket watches. They may be something posing as nothing, or vice versa. In the book’s opening chapters, Alice falls literally into a riddle or void of insolubility: She cannot know how long her fall will be nor what is in the bottle on a small glass table, nor what will happen when she drinks from it.

Yet annoying and worrisome enticements are also—and Carroll seems to have understood this perfectly—incitations to desire, curiosity, and empathy—that is, open invitations not to be bored, not to remain the same as one was but to transform oneself, to relate to things and people outside oneself—and thus bring an end to one’s boredom. The book, like a camera obscura, mechanically and miraculously manufactures its exact mirror opposite. Out of Alice’s boredom arises a series of events defined by their whimsical changeableness, a series of frenetic and ridiculous lessons in bringing about the disappearance of the thing known as boredom itself. Nonsense, like boredom, turns out to be vast and chaotic, spanning inside and outside and defying notions of time and place, scale and sense, rightness and rudeness, rightness and leftness. Boredom seems a temporary non-event defined by a span of near-indeterminate waiting. Is Alice bored because she is desiring nonsensically or unreasonably?

In place of the dullness of an unread book and a large tract of time she doesn’t know how to fill, Alice confronts an officious White Rabbit who is worried about being late, a long or slow fall (it is impossible to tell which) down a hole lined with cupboards and empty jars of marmalade, a bottle that might or might not contain poison, and the frightful—that is, illogical—possibility of drowning in a pool of her own tears. Alice’s adventures are mathematically elaborate literary comfits or problem-sets, frustratingly opaque, more or less timeless events that are not quite events, with people who are not quite people, which is to say they are ridiculous obstacles to Alice’s desires.

What is the mirror opposite of boredom? It turns out to be a book, after all, one that mirrors and somehow inverts the most insoluble, and hence unforgettable, problems of the day: the extinction of species, the shifting, relative sizes of things, the loss of one’s identity and gravitas, and the speed of falling bodies. By chapter IV of Alice, The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill, Carroll appears to have worked wonders upon his heroine and pupil Alice. In one of her most remarkable early bouts of reasoning, Alice concludes that if she drinks from the bottle, "something interesting is sure to happen" (p. 44). Before the end of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the good-natured Alice will have been distracted from her boredom and will have experienced a host of emotions, from bewilderment over bottles and the right vs. left sides of mushrooms, exasperation with the Mad Hatter’s table manners, anger over the rudeness of countless inhabitants of Wonderland, enchantment with miniature gardens, fear of an enormous puppy, and loneliness at having driven a mouse away. Like riddles, the creatures generate an odd mix of pity, curiosity, and exasperation in Alice. The opposite of boredom turns out to be unsettling and frustrating. Ending boredom may be more dangerous a pastime than it at first appears. In this way, Carroll suggests that Alice must be careful that her desires don’t turn into worries. The boredom of the world is indeterminate, whereas worrying, because we tend to worry about something, is not—and this suggests that the subject of our boredom is somehow intrinsically insoluble, at least by worry.

One of the many paradoxes of both Alice books is that what at first appears trivial, nonsensical, or even boring might have some quite untrivial and curious lesson to deliver after all, and that the idea of the Victorian children’s book—whose aim is to educate young readers in the world of morality—might be turned entirely upside down and yet somehow fulfilled at the same time. Lessons in change are paradoxical, as Alice attests:

I wonder if I’ve been changed in the night? Let me think: was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I’m not the same, the next question is, Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle!" (pp. 24-25).

In theory, lessons are imposed so that eventually they may be learned and mastered. Humpty Dumpty claims to be the master of the universe he discourses about. Such a position is precarious. The Liddell sisters would understand the failures of mastery from their scientific geography and mathematical books, some of which Carroll most likely copied into the Alice books. Alice’s various encounters and conversations, the mock trials and sporting events—such as croquet games with flamingos as mallets—tend not to go anywhere conclusive. Races are conducted that nobody wins. People sit down to dine but end up not eating anything. Alice or one of her interlocutors will simply walk away from a conversation. These episodes suggest an alternate and much less rational model of our lives, a cornucopia of blunders, non-conversations, and frustrating encounters. Beneath our rational, day-to-day arrangements and reasonable expectations lies something else entirely: a kind of slapstick psychopathology of our own everyday lives. Mastering boredom turns out to be no easier than mastering desire.

WELL-MEANING SPEAKERS AND THE MASTERY OF LANGUAGE

You won’t make yourself a bit realler by crying. (p. 197)

Unlike most of the creatures in Wonderland, Alice tries to use words, perhaps illogically, to express concern for those around her. When Alice asks Humpty Dumpty a question about the relative safety of the wall vs. the ground because she is worried about the likelihood of his falling off the wall, Humpty Dumpty answers that there’s no chance of (p. 215) his falling off, and then proceeds to explain what will happen if he does. In this exchange, which Alice feels is not like a conversation because Humpty Dumpty never "said anything to her; in fact, his last remark was evidently addressed to a tree (p. 214). Alice’s questions, unlike Humpty Dumpty’s, are asked not with any idea of making another riddle, or a kind of linguistic dueling, but simply

Sie haben das Ende dieser Vorschau erreicht. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen!
Seite 1 von 1

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) denken

4.0
4591 Bewertungen / 129 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    With all the talk recently about Tim Burton's upcoming version of Alice in Wonderland for Disney, it got me in the mood to reread Lewis Carroll's original. I have read Alice's Adventures in Wonderland numerous times, but only until recently have I reread Through the Looking Glass, as I found a lovely collected edition at my local Barnes & Noble. This edition is particularly nice as it includes the original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel for both volumes.Alice's Adventures in Wonderland opens with Alice sitting outside with her sister, doing her lessons. Alice is bored with her lessons, and when she notices a white rabbit run by wearing a waistcoat and looking at watch, which she finds a curious thing, she decides to follow him, where she falls down the rabbit hole and her adventures properly begin.Wonderland proves to be a nonsensical home to many wondrous characters: the Caterpillar, the Mad Hatter, March Hare and Doormouse and their Tea-Party, the Duchess and her baby and Cook, the Cheshire Cat, the Mock Turtle and the Queen of Hearts and her pack-of-cards court. I won't go into too much detail of the story, as I'm sure most are familiar with the tale, and if you're not, my explaining it won't make much sense until you read it. The book reads very much like a dream, with one scenario leading into another without much in the way of logic.Through the Looking Glass is the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, taking place some six months later, even though there is no real reference to the first volume. The only two characters to really carry over from Wonderland are the Mad Hatter and the March Hare (here known as Hatta and Haigha) and even then Alice doesn't seem to recognize them. While Wonderland's court theme was based on a pack of playing cards, the court system in Looking Glass is based on chess, with a Red Queen and White Queen both playing important roles in this volume. Again, the story reads much like a dream, with no real rhyme or reason to the procession of the story.I love the illustrations by Sir John Tenniel. They are perfectly suited to story, capturing the look and feel of the characters and Wonderland.In doing some reading about Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, I made some interesting discoveries. I always assumed that both stories were based on Lewis Carroll's stories that he told to Alice Liddell and her sisters, and while this is partly true, as the chess theme from Looking Glass did in fact come from discussions that Carroll had with the Liddell children while he was teaching them chess, the idea of the looking glass came from a discussion that Carroll had with another Alice, his cousin, Alice Raikes.Alice's Adventures in Wonderland remains one of my favorite books, and I like to wander back into Wonderland every so often, just to remind myself how much I enjoy it. Every time I read it, the Cheshire Cat always sums up the story best for me: 'But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.'Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.''How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.'You must be,' said the Cat, 'or you wouldn't have come here.' This conversation always makes me smile. For me, it is the perfect description and explanation for the story, since in our dreams, aren't we all a little mad?
  • (2/5)
    This summer I flew seven hours and twenty-seven minutes across the Atlantic Ocean to Oxford, England. I studied at Pembroke College in Oxford University and saw Alice’s door myself in Christ Church Cathedral. Alice was a popular topic in Oxford. All the tourist shops had Alice shirts, Alice totes, Alice pencils and so I deemed it fitting that I read Alice in Wonderland during my month stay away from home. To my surprise, I like the Disney movie better than Carroll’s written work. The words just seemed like “mumble-jumble”, as my mother would say, and didn’t make any sense. At one point Alice asks herself, “Would a cat eat a bat? Would a cat eat a bat? Would a bat eat a cat?” while tumbling down the infamous rabbit hole, and throughout the book there were instances like this that seemed a little unnecessary. I found that as I was reading Carroll’s unnecessary flow of drug-induced consciousness, my own mind wandered to what I would do the next day, what meal they were serving in the cafeteria and how much was left on my international calling card. To say the least I was extremely disappointed. I did enjoy some of the stories, particularly the poem about the walrus and the carpenter (which had always been a favorite of mine during my Disney movie watching days), but there were too many little stories jammed together. Too many characters were fighting for attention and page space in the novel and Alice just had too exciting of a dream, especially during Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Through the Looking Class was calmer when it came to plot and every event tied in to the other. I could definitely relate to Carroll’s analogy of the chess board quads. It was an interesting way at looking at the decorative grass squares on campus that were prominent in the Oxford culture (only the Fellows at Oxford could walk on the grass). Turning the last page, I didn’t understand why Oxford was so enamored with Alice and her adventures, even if it was inspired by the spires of the college. Carroll does have an inventive imagination, but I think it would have been better if he had expanded on just a few ideas instead of jamming them all together into one story. He could have written an entire series instead of two books and maybe spacing out the incidents would have helped them flow, making it easier for the reader to enjoy. I can understand why the Disney experts decided to only take part of the story to make the children’s movie. If they had included everything, it would have been far, far too much.
  • (3/5)
    must be horrible to say, but I really feel like Disney took the best parts of the novel and developed it into something beautiful.. i didn't like the mock turtle from the book.. and i wasn't interested enough to read Through the Looking Glass.. sign o the times?
  • (5/5)
    I read this to my 6 year old daughter. We both enjoyed it a great deal. In addition to being masterfully imaginative the writing is wonderful. The way Carroll plays with words is so much fun-- my daughter thought so too. This book is not just for kids, there are layers and layers of linguistuc magic to appreciate at different ages.
  • (5/5)
    When people want to praise a book, especially a children's book, they say that readers of all ages will enjoy it. Mostly this is so that adults will buy the book too, because they're the ones with money. There are a lot of all-ages children's books that are just insulting if read by an adult.Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass, actually are for all ages. I know this because I read them for the first time at the age of fifteen, without any childhood nostalgia to color my judgment. Not only are they the most quotable books in the English language (and I was very surprised at the amount of text that I had seen before elsewhere and not identified as belonging to Carroll), but they make absolutely no sense in the best way: all of their nonsense is in some way connectible to real life, and making sense of the parallels between satire and reality makes you feel really really smart. Yes, I liked that.My best advice: don't judge the books by Disney's movie, which is what I did until recently. Old Walt left out some of the best stuff, and combined elements of both books in a mashup so complete that you can't even really distinguish between them anymore.
  • (4/5)
    so, he liked little girls. a bit quirky but if he didn't, he wouldn't have had no motivation to write this ultimate classic that activates any odd-thinkers thinking capacities and should be made into a musical not another movie for the songs in it are brilliant.
  • (5/5)
    This is my favorite book EVER! Love the stories, love the nonsense, the Cheshire Cat and the Mad Hatter..the tea party scene...the rhymes and the little children songs turned to Lewis Carroll's thinking way. AWE-SOME!! It's my fave ever!

    Really! Own them all!!!
  • (4/5)
    Who doesn't love Alice in Wonderland?
  • (5/5)
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There are two well-loved, oft-adapted, and extremely influential novels written by Lewis Carroll, the pseudonym of English author Charles Lutwidge, in 1865 and 1871 respectively. I was initially a little surprised when Seven Seas announced that it would be publishing a newly illustrated omnibus edition of the novels in 2014, especially as the company had moved away from publishing prose works in recent years in order to focus on manga and other comics. However, the novels do nicely complement Seven Seas' releases of the various Alice in the Country of manga. What makes Seven Seas' edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass stand out from others are the incredibly cute and charming manga-influenced illustrations by Kriss Sison, an International Manga Award-winning artist from the Philippines. In addition to a gallery of color artwork, hundreds of black-and-white illustrations can be found throughout the volume.Alice was enjoying a leisurely afternoon on a riverbank with her older sister when a very curious thing happened—a rabbit with a pocket watch hurries by talking to itself. When Alice follows after it she tumbles down a rabbit hole to find herself in a very strange place indeed. What else is there to do for an inquisitive and adventurous young girl but to go exploring? And so she does. As Alice wanders about she discovers food and drink that cause her to grow and shrink, animals of all sizes and shapes that can talk, and people who have very peculiar ways of thinking about and approaching life. Eventually she returns home to her sister, but several months later she finds herself once again slipping into a fantastical world when she crawls through the mirror above a fireplace mantel. Of course, Alice immediately sets off exploring, encountering even more strange and wondrous things and meeting all sorts of new and perplexing people.Despite already being familiar with the story of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (mostly through the seemingly infinite number of adaptations and otherwise Alice-inspired works) and despite having been encouraged for years by devotees of Carroll's writings, I had never actually read the original novels for myself until I picked up Seven Seas' edition. I'm really somewhat astonished that it took me so long to do so and it truly is a shame that I didn't get around to it sooner. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass is absolutely marvelous and an utter joy to read. It's easy to see why the novels have been treasured and continue to be treasured by so many people for well over a century. The books are incredibly imaginative and delightfully clever. Carroll liberally employs puns and other wordplay, turning nonsense into logic and vice versa. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass has been translated into something like seventy different languages; though certainly worthwhile, I can't imagine these interpretations were easy to accomplish due to the novels' linguistic complexities.What particularly impresses me about Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass are the novels' broad appeal. Both children and adults can easily enjoy the works. Younger readers will likely be amused and drawn to their silliness while more mature readers will be able to more fully appreciate the cleverness of Carroll's prose, poetry, and song. I would wholeheartedly encourage just about anyone to read Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. Even without counting the multitude of adapted works, there are a huge number of editions of the original two novels available. There is bound to be a version that will appeal, whether it be Martin Gardner's extensively annotated editions, which reveal references that modern readers are apt to miss, or one of the many illustrated releases. While I may one day move on to The Annotated Alice, I was very pleased with Seven Seas' Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. Carroll's novels and Sison's illustrations are a delightful combination. I am very glad to have finally read the novels and anticipate reading them again with much enjoyment.Experiments in Manga
  • (4/5)
    Alice's wonderland is a book about all the different storys that they tell about this book so it really werd. It starts out with Alice in a really big room with lots and lots of door. Then she is in a room with a peace of cake she eats it and she becomes really really small. An then she will go into a door and she will be in a house not any house a rabbits house. She finds the same cake and she eats it and this time she is really really big. Then she is in a forest and she finds a worm and she talks to and she like i want to be my on size. Then she is in a palace and she sees these cards painting a tree red. An then she wakes up in the really world. I think that this book is really good it is a little werd but it really good anyway. I think people will like this book a lot its a book that has many other books in it but short chapters. It was really good to read I really liked it a lot. The only thing that i didnt like was the end of the book it was not the best it in world . It end with Alice waking up from her sleep I dont like that its not the best ending in the world.Its just my opinion mabye other people like these books to but i dont. This just what i think of this really really good book evan though i did not like the ending.
  • (5/5)
    Just a great, fun, silly, magical, fantastical look into the life and imagination of a young child. I loved every minute of it. I wish I could be Alice!
  • (4/5)
    There's a reason Alice has remained popular for years - her story is always entertaining, a nice break from reality, yet never entirely mindless. Looking for the meaning behind Carroll's nonsense is a pursuit that will never grow old.
  • (3/5)
    In this classic children's story, the reader follows Alice along on her adventures, running into all sorts of oddball characters, such as the Chershire Cat, the Catepillar, the Mad Hatter, and the March Hare. In the world described, known as "Wonderland," anything seems to be possible if the conception is right, as Alice initially enters it falling down a well, and therefrom becomes tiny, then 9 feet tall and skinny, subsequently running into these characters after having followed the "white rabbit." Within the story lie poems which describe the particular character or scene; one of which "Father William," describes old age to his son. I found this book very hard to get through. The characters themselves are interesting, and the book offers artwork to accopany the pictures, but the storyline continuity and descriptions themselves made the story quite dull. When the reader finds out her Adventures were just a dream, the surprise did not inspire any emotive response from me, nor did I even care. I found this book to be gravely overrated, and not worth the time.
  • (3/5)
    A really creative guy, that Lewis Carroll... but I wish he would've written these books more with the goal of publication in mind than that of entertaining a child, because Alice's adventures wander far too much to keep my attention very well.
  • (4/5)
    Good grief, this book is WEIRD. Carroll had aura-inducing migraines and probably took LSD to cope with it, which makes for a book... exactly like this one. It is a great read, though, especially for anyone with a love of words. The puns themselves are worth your time, and Alice is a delightful character. It's also an important novel in literary canon, though usually given to too young an audience. Personally, I think a life is unfilled until at least the first stanza of the Jabberwocky is memorized and recited at random. (Fun game: combine drinking and this as a read-aloud!) I'd recommend reading both books combined. For a similar book suited for a younger audience, "The Phantom Tollbooth" is a wonderful novel.
  • (5/5)
    This is my favorite story of all-time. Nothing, in my opinion, beats Alice and the adventures she creates in her own mind. The whole experience of reading (and re-reading, and maybe re-reading again...) this book is magical to me. Lewis Carroll's humor and writing style alone is enough to make me want to read more.
  • (5/5)
    Alice falls into a dreamworld of rhymes, cryptic poetry, and an array of crazy characters. This beautiful story takes the idea of creativity to an extreme, and proves there are no limits to the imagination. This book is great for children and adults of all ages.
  • (5/5)
    My first introduction to Alice in Wonderland was seeing the Disney movie when I was little. I remember enjoying it, but at the same time being annoyed by the confusing nature. I read the book a couple years later. At the time I loved the storyline but was thoroughly frustrated by the books' lack of cohesion. I reread Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass recently, and I found them entertaining in an entirely new fashion. If you try to force sensibility into any of the situations, you will miss out on the enjoyability of the random. Both books are the closest to reading a dream I have ever come upon, due to the randomness of the events. It is a fun read for adults and kids alike.
  • (5/5)
    It's saturday, it's cold and it's raining, so of course I had to stay in bed and re-read my ultimate comfort book ♥ the only problem is that now I'm yet again left craving tea and bread-and-butter.
  • (5/5)
    One of the books I always wanted to read and never seemed to have the time to. As a child I read some Spanish translations, more of them adaptations not very true to the original one, but then time passed and always had other things to read and study. Finally I decided that I had to read it. I will not add anything to what many people has written for decades, it is simply great, a must read for any person regardless of their age, charming and crazy, simply wonderful.I enjoyed it a lot and will include it in the list of "mandatory" books for my daughter as soon as she can read.
  • (4/5)
    Synopsis: In Alice in Wonderland, a little girl follows a white rabbit and falls into another world with characters that represent political figures. In Through the Looking-Glass Alice encounters more of the same.Review: As a child I loved these books. Reading them as an adult was work. They made little sense and the nonsense was annoying.
  • (4/5)
    تعتبر رواية ” أليس في بلاد العجائب ” واحدة من معالم الأدب العالمي البارزة، تستهوى الأطفال و الكبار ، جيلاً بعد جيل. تدور أحداثها حول شخصية أليس الحالمة والمغامرة وحول كثير من الشخصيات الغريبة مثل الأرنب الأبيض وقط الشيشاير وأرنب مارس الوحشي … وتجعل من مغامراتها عملاً أدبيًا خالدًاIs the novel "Alice in Wonderland" and one of the prominent landmarks of world literature, appealing to children and adults, generation after generation. Takes place around the figure of Alice and dreamy adventure about a lot of strange characters such as the White Rabbit and never Cichair and rabbit March brutal ... and make their adventures immortal literary work
  • (4/5)
    This book is just fun. Everything about it is fun. :)
  • (5/5)
    I feel like I won a prize, somehow. This lovely edition of Alice has full-color plates of many of the Tenniel illustrations, and is in very good condition, considering its age. The only flaw is that there's one of those horrid bookplates in the front, on the flyleaf. Who can resist spending a lazy afternoon with Alice? Not I.
  • (4/5)
    Really very clever writing. It's hard to believe that he was a perv ... I just can't see it. Too much imagination goes in to the story to think his imagination lie elsewhere. Carroll was thinking outside the box before that was really done.
  • (5/5)
    Is it a children's story or a primer on logic or even a work of wit and wisdom?Maybe it's all three.Alice in Wonderland, and Through the Looking Glass make up the two Alice books by Lewis Carroll. And in these books, Carroll paints a strange world in which logic has a strange way about it, mostly consisting of folk who interpret things quite literally.This, being a classic of children's literature, has been mimicked by many, and by many, unsuccessfully. Though, I will admit that many adaptations of this work have been made satisfactorily.The first book takes Alice down a rabbit hole and into wonderland. There, she meets all sorts of strange characters and discovers the queen of hearts, as well as other card-themed characters. The queen, it seems, is obsessed with displacing people's heads, and Alice must take every precaution to not upset her majesty.The second book takes Alice through a looking glass into a chess-themed world. Here the cruel magnate is the red queen. Alice learns many new poems and logical quirks before returning back through the looking glass.This book is sure to be enjoyed by bright children as well as adults who are kids at heart.
  • (2/5)
    Besides the upcoming Tim Burton version of Alice in Wonderland coming out in March 2010, I was interested in reading Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass to get a better idea of it's status as a 'classic'

    When I read it, however, I was VERY disappointed. As a young girl, I think I thought Alice was similar to me. Reading about her now, I found her to be annoying and dumb.

    To be honest, when the movie comes out, I don't think I'll be upset in the least if Burton changes things.

    I was just really disappointed.
  • (5/5)
    This story houses one of the worlds I wish I could of visited over and over when I was a child.
  • (5/5)
    A brilliant children's classic that doesn't talk down to its readers. Its heroine is far from perfect and the characters she meets are almost subversively zany.
  • (5/5)
    In this classic the eponymous character follows a dignified white rabbit down a hole and into a strange, magical world where she must endure numerous trials and tribulations both whimsical and disturbing. This book can be appreciated on multiple levels, and is suitable both for young children (who can enjoy the majestic setting and strange adventures) and young adults (who will be better able to appreciate its more complex underlying themes and symbolism).