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Spider-Man: Blue

Spider-Man: Blue

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Spider-Man: Blue

Bewertungen:
3/5 (80 Bewertungen)
Länge:
157 Seiten
40 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736727076
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Dieser moderne Klassiker ist nicht nur ein nostalgischer Rückblick auf die Ära von Stan Lee und John Romita Sr., sondern auch eine gefühlvolle Geschichte über Erinnerungen.Peter Parker denkt an seine erste Begegnung mit Mary Jane zurück, die Tage mit der Clique, an seine große Liebe Gwen Stacy sowie an seine ersten Kämpfe mit Rhino, der Echse, demGeier und anderen.
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736727076
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


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Spider-Man - Jeph Loeb

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Spider-Man denken

3.1
80 Bewertungen / 7 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    I've never really been into Spider-Man, but this seemed like a pretty cohesive and independent book, so I decided to pick it up. It was, I dunno, alright. It wasn't particularly memorable or noteworthy, just the story of how Peter Parker fell in love with Gwen Stacey. I'm familiar with the Spider-Man mythos, and this book didn't offer much in the way of insights into any character, including Parker himself, who narrates the entire thing. The most characterization we get is that Gwen's death makes him feel "blue", hence the title.

    It's a pretty long book in which nothing really seems to happen. Spider-Man gets attacked by various big bads, he defeats them, then discovers they were all put up to it by another big bad, who he defeats as well. The most interesting character is actually Flash, who picks on Peter Parker but, after having his life saved by Spider-Man, decides he wants to do more with his life and joins the army. Our hero calls this decision idiotic, which is needlessly insulting in addition to pretty dumb, considering that Peter is in the Avengers. Anyway, Flash is the only character who starts one place and ends in another, but his role in the book is minor.

    All in all, this wasn't BAD, but it wasn't GOOD either. It's just all around meh, total mediocrity, utterly forgettable. Pick it up if you have virtually no familiarity with Spider-Man, I guess.
  • (4/5)
    i love jeph loeb and tim sale. sale did a great job with the art; he takes romita sr.'s characters and makes them his own.
  • (4/5)
    Recently picked up a bunch of Loeb and Sale collections that I found reasonably priced on eBay. As far as the comic book version of Peter Parker is concerned, I've always been Team M-J, coming to the Spider-verse long after Gwen Stacey was gone. This story takes Petey back to the early days where both these manic dream pixie girls were starting to express an interest. It's plenty of fun, but it's shot through with the kind of melancholy only a middle-aged reader of superhero comics can relate to. I don't mind admitting that I cried the first time M-J says, "Face it, tiger... "and Tim Sale's work here is gorgeously cartoony. It's a wonderful tribute to Gwen that honors Peter and Mary-Jane's relationship and a lovely addition to my library.
  • (3/5)
    Jeph Loeb is one of the luckiest guys in the world. His reputation is largely based on several comics projects he did with artist/master storyteller Tim Sale. He has parlayed his success into a number of other high profile projects and is now the executive in charge of Marvel's television wing.

    This comic looks back to the flowering of the love affair between Peter Parker and Gwen Stacey. In the lore of Spidey, Gwen is his one true love, even though he later famously married Mary Jane Watson (this marriage was subsequently undone--long story). Gwen tragically died, thrown off a bridge by the Green Goblin.

    This book was diverting and beautifully drawn, but only competently written (which is the best you can say about the best of Loeb's work). It doesn't even come close to capturing the depths of longing and emotional highs that reading those long ago tales by Stan Lee, John Romita Sr., Gil Kane, and Gerry Conway still produces.

    If you want to read the story of one of the great tragic romances in superhero comics, find yourself some reprints, conveniently bundled in the more expensive, full color Marvel Masterworks volumes, or the cheaper, black and white Essential Spider-Man "phone books".
  • (4/5)
    This is the thirty-third novel (Volume 25) to be released under the Marvel "Ultimate Graphic Novel Collection" banner. "Spider-Man: Blue" (alongside "Hulk: Grey" and "Daredevil: Yellow") is one of three graphic novels by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale that looks at pivotal events and defining moments in three of Marvel's most popular characters. This particular book collects the "Spider-Man: Blue" mini-series that ran for six issues between July 2002 and April 2003 and focuses on the classic period in the Spider-Man mythology when Peter Parker first met both Gwen Stacy and Mary Jane Watson and how he gradually fell in love with Gwen. The soap opera elements (which were always the best part of the classic era Spider-Man) are off-set by plenty of action and adventure as Spider-Man finds himself in combat with a slew of classic villains including the Vulture, Green Goblin, the Rhino and Doctor Octopus. The story is made all the more poignant through Peter's telling the tale in the present in the full knowledge of the eventual fate of Gwen. The story that Loeb tells is enjoyable, if a touch revisionist and captures the essence of what made the Spider-Man of this period so great. That said neither the story nor the artwork truly capture the sense of absolute joy and wonder that resonated through the original Stan Lee / John Romita tales. The book is a beautifully produced hardback, with the artwork reproduced on high-quality glossy paper. Extras in this edition include thorough articles on both Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale and a Gallery outlining the various stages in the development of the story accompanied by commentary by Sale and Loeb. This is another excellent package from the "Ultimate Graphic Novel Collection" line.
  • (4/5)
    I loved the visual nod to the older comics. It was fun to have a story with each of Spider-man's early adversaries and all threaded together in one little story.
  • (5/5)
    A future Peter Parker is talking into a recorder and remembering the events that led up to Valentine's Day that he had with Gwen Stacy back when he was in college and had just met both her and Mary Jane Watson and his world changed. While fighting the Green Goblin an explosion causes Norman Osbourne to forget that he is the Green Goblin and that Peter Parker is Spider-Man so Spider-Man burns his costume and rescues him from the burning building to deliver him to the waiting fire department hoping he did the right thing in saving his life.Peter goes to the Daily Bugle with pictures declaring that the Green Goblin is dead. Now J. Johah Jameson wants pictures of Norman Osbourne for the paper so Peter goes to the hospital and soon becomes friends with his son Harry which is where he meets Gwen Stacy. When classes start up Peter has a lab with Gwen and Flash who is determined to keep Peter down, while Gwen tries to flirt with him and makes a study date with him and the gang that he winds up bringing Mary Jane to, whom he has just met, and then leaves with her on his new motorcycle.Meanwhile, the Rhino has escaped custody and Peter will need help from Dr. Connors, aka the Lizzard to figure out how to get past his tough hide. Unfortunately, the materials that Dr. Connor must work with to help defeat the Rhino cause him to become the Lizzard just when his family is coming up from Florida for a visit so Spidey must try to turn the Lizzard back into Dr. Connor. But these aren't the only creatures Spider-Man will face nor is this all a coincidence.Gwen and Mary Jane spend time going after Peter full force and for once Peter has the trouble of too many women. But the girl he seems to really want to be with is Gwen Stacy, however, Mary Jane does seem to be a very pretty distraction. This comic is called Blue for a reason. Some of the pages are colored in Blue and his memories of this Valentine's Day make him blue. This is an excellent comic in tone and content and characters. Loeb and Sales are excellent writers and are known for writing the Batman comic The Long Halloween, Batman Hush comic (Loeb alone), the Daredevil Yellow comic, the Hulk Gray Comic, and the Captain America White comic. Loeb also wrote the movie Teen Wolf, the TV show The Ultimate Spiderman, Smallville, Heroes, and Gotham. He also executive produced such TV shows as Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Luke Cage, Iron Fist, Spider-Man, Legion, Cloak and Dager, and The Gifted. The smart-ass humor is there but so is the dark emotionality of someone who misses a girl he loves, perhaps his first love. This is a must-read for all Spider-Man fans and I strongly recommend it for those who just love comics. I give it five out of five stars.