Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Hawkeye Megaband 1 - Mein Leben als Waffe

Hawkeye Megaband 1 - Mein Leben als Waffe

Vorschau lesen

Hawkeye Megaband 1 - Mein Leben als Waffe

Bewertungen:
4/5 (355 Bewertungen)
Länge:
241 Seiten
53 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736725652
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die gefeierten Solo-Abenteuer des Avengers mit Pfeil und Bogen! Abseits der Rächer zeigt Clint Barton in diesen grafisch und inhaltlich innovativen Geschichten, wie man auch ohne Superkräfte ein echter Held sein kann. Mit dabei: jede Menge schöne Frauen, Gangster mit überaus zweifelhaftem Modegeschmack und ein unscheinbarer Hund, der Pizza liebt!
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736725652
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


Ähnlich wie Hawkeye Megaband 1 - Mein Leben als Waffe

Ähnliche Bücher

Buchvorschau

Hawkeye Megaband 1 - Mein Leben als Waffe - Matt Fraction

Sie haben das Ende dieser Vorschau erreicht. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen!
Seite 1 von 1

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Hawkeye Megaband 1 - Mein Leben als Waffe denken

4.0
355 Bewertungen / 28 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    So my wife introduced me to this graphic novel, and since then, I've decided that marrying her was a brilliant choice.

    One of my favourite things about this comic is it's about Clint's life when he's not being an Avenger. He's just being Barton. He's depressed, he's moping around a shitty apartment in Brooklyn and normal life is fucking hard for him.

    I quote some lines from this comic, and this comic regularly inspires me to write. I love the art style. It's inspired by that old, gritty noir-esque comic book art that I love. The colour palettes are perfect (and purple) and I adore them.

    Am I on this bandwagon? Hell yeah I am, I'll ride the goddamned bandwagon right into the sun. I didn't really care about Hawkeye much before, right? To me, he was an Avenger who was sometimes in the comics with a whole swathe of other Avengers who was really good with a bow and arrow and who had the occasional speech bubble.

    But now? Now I love this guy, and I love this comic.
  • (5/5)
    Hawkeye Vol 1 I can't really say enough good stuff about this trade! I seriously am super happy with myself for already owning the first printing issue 1 for this comic. It is amazing. The dialogue is clever and we see how Hawkeye isn't really a 'hero' but someone struggling with having been in the Avengers and now living a 'normal' life. Though of course nothing is really normal and we meet the amazing Kate Bishop in this trade. It all pretty much rounds up to be an incredible trade and I can't wait to read more Hawkeye! 5/5 Stars!
  • (5/5)
    This series takes its cue from the recent trends toward sparer, more iconic image-making. The art is simple but visually stunning and beautiful, the stories are plausible and the dialogue actually works - and that's saying something for comic books. The main conceit is that Hawkeye is good at shooting but not at much else. He gets himself into all sorts of trouble just by not knowing how to mind his own business - but that's also what makes him a hero. The last chapter is from the Young Avengers series and feels out of place. While it develops Kate Bishop's character, it presents a competent Hawkeye/Ronin who has taken on the mantle of Capt. America. Visually it's old-school, with rich, detailed figures and a greater realism.
  • (4/5)
    That was very enjoyable. A little on the silly side but still very enjoyable.
  • (5/5)
    What a cool comic! Seems I’m falling for Matt Fraction’s style. Looking forward to reading more. (And thanks, Misty, for the gift
  • (3/5)
    I've been waiting for this to come out as a graphic novel for what feels like forever. I had heard great things about it and about Kate Bishop (the new female sidekick.) This felt like an intro book as it clearly was. We're getting to know Hawkeye again. The kind of person he is, how he lives his life, etc. We also get a chance to meet Kate and see how she got involved with Hawkeye. I'm looking forward to reading more of the series.
  • (3/5)
    Surprisingly entertaining for a superhero comic (as a non-superhero comic fan); I liked the portions drawn by David Aja better, and the story and dialogue were more fun and exciting. The tracksuit draculas are HILARIOUS, bro. Overall decent; the Aja story line has broader appeal, and the Pulido pieces might be more for committed Avengers/Young Avengers readers.
  • (4/5)
    A collection of stories about Avenger "normal" man, Clint Barton. Clint is a lot of fun since he has no supernatural strengths, but relies wholly on his marksmanship and wit and a strong sense of right and wrong. I didn't really read very many American comics as a kid (relying more on the French, Belgians, and Dutch), but I'm having a good time catching up and Hawkeye is one of my new favorites. David Aja's art gave me some pause to start with, but once I'd gotten used to it, I was somewhat disappointed when Javier Pulido's more conventional style took over after issue 3. This volume also contains an issue of Young Avengers with Kate Bishop as Hawkeye and Clint Barton in his role as mentor, which is interesting and the art is good, but I personally prefer the "regular" issues.
  • (3/5)
    first time i've read any hawkeye material. pretty solid.
  • (4/5)
    I heard nothing but praise for the new Hawkeye run by Matt Fraction, so I decided to check it out. My attitude going in was pretty much "really? Hawkeye? Seriously who gives a shit?" but I found it surprisingly compelling.Hawkeye in this version is without the stupid purple outfit, now he's basically just an Avenger with good aim and a bunch of different kinds of arrows. The entire production lampshades the idea of Hawkeye, he constantly references not feeling good enough since he's just a regular human, and he constantly grabs the wrong trick arrows from his quiver since they're not labeled and he "really needs to get around to doing that". It's funny though occasionally borderline obnoxious with it's quippiness. Every character has to be Spiderman now, it's lame.There's a strong noir influence to the story, which largely involves Hawkeye taking on an underground crime ring. This has elements of The Punisher as well, in that he's a normal human facing normal human criminal foes instead of superhumans, and it works well for the character. The story eventually gets involved with a weird plot about an assassination on tape which deals with all sorts of Bourne-esque intrigue and betrayal and triple-crossing. The art style, with it's muted colors and simplistic 2D cartoon drawings, actually works to a disadvantage here, since it becomes increasingly difficult to tell people apart, most notably Maria Hill and Kate Bishop. The plot itself becomes mired in complexity as it goes on, with lots of twists and revelations that increasingly strain credulity.Overall, this didn't make me a huge Hawkeye fan, but I've always considered Hawkeye to be largely useless baggage in the Avengers (including the film), this gave him some depth that I appreciated. I'd like to see a bit more from him, I hope this run influences Whedon for Avengers 2. Worth a read.
  • (5/5)
    WHAT IS IT ABOUT?Matt Fraction’s “Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life as a Weapon” is a collection of five first issues of “Hawkeye” comic book series plus the sixth issue of the “Young Avengers Presents.” Clint Barton, a.k.a. Hawkeye, is one of the Avengers, Earth’s mightiest heroes who fight “the foes no single superhero can withstand.” However, unlike his teammates, Hawkeye has no superpowers or fancy armor; he is just an ordinary guy who happens to be VERY good with bow and arrows. And this is what Hawkeye is up to when he is not an Avenger.MY THOUGHTS:1) My newly found love for superheroes.I’ve never considered myself a fan of superheroes and I’ve never even heard about Hawkeye before. To be honest, “Hawkeye, Vol.1” is the first superhero comic book I’ve ever read. However, I absolutely loved this book and I am already looking forward to reading the second volume. In fact, I loved “Hawkeye, Vol. 1” so much that it inspired me to read/watch/learn more about the other superheroes as well. Seriously, it’s pretty awesome!2) Surprisingly realistic (for a superhero).Hawkeye is excellent at shooting and can fight pretty good as well but he is by no means invincible; he gets banged up, he gets shot, he gets robbed, he gets kidnapped. No flying, no tights (not all the time, at least). He is just like us, no?3) Stimulating entertainment.Each of the six stories is fast-paced, action-packed, well-thought-out, entertaining and absorbing. I especially love the opening scenes of chapters 2, 3 and 5 where the author reveals the climax of the story (accompanied by Hawkeye’s comment, “Okay, this looks bad.”) and then rewinds back to tell how the characters got to this point. However, in chapter 1 such a retrospective approach is slightly overdone, as the present and past scenes are switched so often that it is quite a puzzle to figure out the actual sequence of the events.4) Great artwork but not all by the same artist.Generally, I enjoyed the illustrations as much as I liked the story itself. It still blows my mind every time I try to imagine how much time, effort, talent and teamwork takes to draw each panel. However, I can’t help but mention that different chapters are illustrated by different artists (chapters 1-3 by David Aja, chapters 4-5 by Javier Pulido, and chapter 6 by Alan Davis). Since each artist has his own style, the same characters appear slightly different with subtle changes in their personalities. My favorite illustrations are probably by Aja (I swear, from certain angles Hawkeye looks like Brad Pitt!). Also, reading the last chapter made me want to workout more; everyone looks so DAMN hot!VERDICT:“Hawkeye, Vol 1: My Life as a Weapon” is so surprisingly good that I urge you to give it a try. I absolutely loved these entertaining action-packed adventures of a self-made superhero. However, I would prefer all the chapters drawn by the same artist.
  • (4/5)
    Oh, Clint Barton. You adorable, awkward, totally kick-ass man, you! I'm so glad that my co-worker convinced me to read this! What does Hawkeye do when he's not with the Avengers? That's what this book sets out to show, and it does an excellent job.

    First off, Matt Fraction's writing is superb. He gives Clint this perfect balance between sarcastic and sweet. It's hard not to fall head over heels in love with him. Watching him put on himself on the line for other people, lament the fact that he has no actual superpowers, and flirt awkwardly with Kate Bishop was all kinds of fun. I cracked up laughing more than once at the things that come out of this man's mouth. He really needs a better filter.

    In terms of art, it's pure perfection here! It's not the most crisp art ever, and it has the tendency to be a bit duochrome, but it suits the story just fine. I especially loved all the panels where pizza dog made his debut! It's impressive that these amazing illustrators were able to bring an entire story line to life with nothing but wordless panels. LOVE!
  • (4/5)
    This was recommended by a friend and I was glad for the suggestion. The book consists of two short stories in the graphic novel. This is a collection of the first issues of Hawkeye comic books.There are two protagonists in one persona, Hawkeye. The two are Clint Barton and Kate Bishop. The backstory is that Clint was one of the Avengers, with no special ability but an extraordinary talent with the bow. When he was presumed killed, Captain America passed the bow on to Kate, who possessed similar skills. The story works on the relationship between these to versions of Hawkman.I found the characters and the stories are interesting. The artists, David Aja and Javier Pulido do a good job. I like the composition, both the scenes and the page layout. They make good use of color to delimit segments of different sequences within the story. Although I felt the pacing was too fast, a common issue with graphic novels in general.The story is both exciting and funny. They way the two characters interact can draw you in and make you believe and like both characters. It is well worth a good read.
  • (5/5)
    "Okay, this looks bad." A fitting opening for the series, in which Clint Barton just can't catch a break. Between the tracksuit mafia, the other Hawkeye (an heiress named Kate Bishop), and a one-eyed dog, his life is complicated even without the trouble that comes from being in the hero business.One of the best Marvel runs in recent memory. Recommended for everyone.
  • (5/5)
    I haven't read many comics over the past few years other than the New 52 Batman series and Powers. This came highly recommended, and I have to say it was amazing. Fraction's writing is just so fun, and Aja's art so perfect for the story that I found myself enjoying this more than I've enjoyed a comic in a long time.
  • (4/5)
    Fun stuff. This is the first time I'd read a Hawkeye book, and I enjoyed it, especially as it heavily features Kate of the Young Avengers. she is especially awesome.

    My daughter's personal copy
  • (4/5)
    I know I said I was giving up on superhero comics. I know, okay? But I kept seeing this title being talked about on the internet and decided I needed to give it a try.

    I adored this, okay? Just instantly. Adored this version of Clint, adored Kate, adored Aja's art especially (one of the three main artists in this collection), adored the modern noir feel of the stories. I love how impulsive and by the seat of his pants Clint is, and how he attributes his good guy instinct to spending so much time around Captain America. (Though I wish they would have gone with a more modern look for Cap). The humor is perfectly wry -- I found myself cackling on the bus and couldn't be bothered to care if everyone thought I was crazy.

    I did not care for the Young Avengers arc, however. At all. I didn't care for the art, especially Kate and her bee-stung lips and fanservice poses. I know the point was the establish the backstory of how Kate & Clint met, but it actually made me feel more adrift in lack of context by hinting at all this Avengers v. Young Avengers drama, and the Cap used to think Clint was dead, and what the hell? The whole section irritated me. I hope it doesn't make too many more appearances in the series, because otherwise, I'm now a big fan.
  • (4/5)
    A pleasing and humerous Hawkeye. Here he has teamed up with a young woman, Kate Bishop, who is as good an archer as he is. Clean graphics round out a well-done superhero outing.
  • (4/5)
    My Life as a Weapon is the first volume in Matt Fraction’s series about Clint Barton, also known as Hawkeye, a non-super powered super-hero who spends most of his time with the Avengers. The stories presented in this series are about what Hawkeye does when he is not working alongside Iron Man, Thor, and Captain America, and it turns out that the answer is mostly “gets in way over his head and gets injured”.The interesting thing about Barton is that he’s pretty much simply an ordinary person with an extraordinary talent for archery. He isn’t super strong, he isn’t super durable, and he doesn’t have any high-tech equipment to help him out: He is, as is pointed out in the first pages of this volume, just a guy fighting crime with a weapon that dates to the Paleolithic era. The fact that he often stands shoulder-to-shoulder with medically enhanced super soldiers and literal gods while fighting cosmically powerful threats that could destroy all of humanity and doesn’t die in the process is the most remarkable aspect of Hawkeye’s existence.Fraction begins each of the first three parts of this volume with Barton saying to the reader, in what amounts to a voiceover, “Okay, this looks bad”. Each time Barton follows this up with an admission that the situation doesn’t just look bad, it actually is bad. Each time Barton proceeds to get the crap beat out of him, in some cases almost immediately thereafter, in others he can stave off the inevitable for a bit, but he winds up unconscious at least once in every sections of the story, and twice in two of them. In one incident, Barton ends up severely injured and hospitalized for an extended period of time. The running theme that underlies everything else in this volume is that the human body is simply too fragile for the life that Barton is leading.[More forthcoming]
  • (3/5)
    Oh Hawkeye, you sassy bitch. Both of you.Needless to say, I really enjoyed Clint getting his own outing, and I like Matt Fraction's work at first blush. I loved Kate Bishop's presence, having just read Young Avengers: Sidekicks and Family Matters. I liked the dog and if I ever go back to writing fic again, I'll work him into it somewhere. I loved Clint's smart mouth (and Kate's).I don't want to think it over too much, though. It was fun, but lacking in much to get hold of. I mean, Clint randomly tries to buy someone's car, then has sex with her and lets his guard down enough that he gets knocked out while she's kidnapped. I know half the point of Hawkeye is that he doesn't have powers, and of course he's more fallible than Captain America, but that seemed off.
  • (4/5)
    This is a collection of the first 5 issues of Hawkeye, with a bonus issue of Young Avengers thrown in for good measure. I confess that I know these characters primarily from Marvel movies. I further confess that I've read very few comic books. Don't hold this against me. I really enjoyed this book. There were times that the speed of the action and the story was so fast that I felt like I was just bouncing from fight to fight and not really learning anything about the characters. I think that may just be characteristic of the medium though. Thankfully, that wasn't the case throughout. Issues 4 and 5 are two parts of a longer story, which gave a little more breathing room for the audience to learn a bit more about Clint and Kate. BTW, I love Kate. She kicks ass. I dig that they keep the purple theme going throughout: Clint's always wearing some purple. Always. Little things like that make me smile.This brings me to the bonus issue of Young Avengers #6 (also written by Matt Fraction), which introduces Kate as Hawkeye. This seems to take place in a different time from the Hawkeye comic, in that Clint is now Ronin and they talk of Captain America as though he has passed. Bonus points for the Mythbusters reference in Young Avengers #6. Also, we see the home base of the older Avenger crew and Spiderman is hanging upside-down playing video games. All the others there are in street clothes; he's the only one still in costume (or would that be uniform?) Because why wouldn't he stay in costume so that he could hang upside to play video games. Duh!All in all, I really enjoyed this book and look forward to the next volume.
  • (4/5)
    Just reread this & love it as a great character driven book unlike so many
  • (4/5)
    After seeing several panels from this comic, I wanted to read the entire story. I was not disappointed. Hilarious, with simple, expressive art and coloring, and a action-based plot. It’s perfect – exactly how I imagine Hawkeye. Fraction brilliantly captured Clint Barton. With a story balanced between humor and suspense, action, romance, and a pizza dog – this is a perfect comic. I enjoyed it immensely and will definitely read the rest.
  • (4/5)
    Hawkeye, one of the Avengers, is a very well-known marksman. His weapon of choice is the bow and arrow. However, at the beginning of this series, it doesn’t look too good for Hawkeye, also known as Clint Barton. In this series, the readers will get to know what Hawkeye is like outside of the Avengers circle. He does work alone as a free-agent and even though he does not have super human powers or gadgets, he can do some major damage to save his friends. Although the words are relatively easy for readers, with so many flashbacks and backtracking, the readers might get confused on the order of the story. The illustrations bring the story to life, starting with the cover art. The cover art shows Hawkeye as an Avengers member; quiet, stealth, skilled marksman. However, once the book is opened, it takes you to the world of Clint Barton. All the pages are colored and drawn with elaborate detail. The readers will be able to see the characters’ facial expressions and feel their emotion. The comic also uses lots of sound effects and it makes it seem as if you can hear them. This is a great opportunity for readers to familiarize themselves with Clint Barton, the man behind the bow and arrow. If you became a fan of Hawkeye through the Marvel Universe movies, this is a must-read. He has a great story to tell. This is the first issue of many issues to come.
  • (5/5)
    Using "the Avengers" Hollywood blockbuster as a starting point, Fraction, Aja and Pulido re-imagine the story of Hawkeye as the Avenger without superpowers, and a man who's addicted to trouble. Unlike other long-running superhero comics, "Hawkeye: My Life as a Weapon" explicitly does not require understanding of a larger back story and can be read as a standalone volume.Fraction, Aja and Pulido's choice to stray from the conventional superhero comic is also reflected in their illustration style. Hawkeye does dodge one too many bullets, but he's not a brawny superhero in a wetsuit; he gets shot, gets hurt and is prone to human error. The short stories in this volume also feature smart, snappy writing and Fraction does a great job of marrying Hawkeye's internal monologue (it's sparse, for one) with the external dialogue. Highly recommended, even for non-superhero-comic readers.
  • (4/5)
    This book is supposed to be about Clint Barton, but Kate Bishop steals the show. Clint is portrayed as so ridiculously bumbling that it seems impossible that he should be an Avenger. But Kate is smart, and cool, and comes in and saves Clint's bacon. Yay for strong women superheroes!
  • (4/5)
    Totally annoying plot fakeout, which is par for the course in a 2-issue "series". Marvel should give Clint a full 12-issue arc to show a real story.
  • (4/5)
    When I walked out of the theatre after watching The Avengers last year, I was too blown away by the awesomeness of The Hulk to even remember Jeremy Renner’s performance as Clint Barton (a.k.a.Hawkeye; a.k.a. the guy with the arrows). His role as a member of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes had felt rather diminished and seemed like an afterthought. Hawkeye wasn’t nearly as exciting, memorable or as flashy as Thor, Iron Man or even Agent Colson. So when I heard all the buzz behind Matt Fraction’s take on Earth’s Mightiest Marksman, I had to see this for myself.

    Fraction basically approaches Hawkeye by treating him as that outsider, the guy in the Avengers without the mind-blowing super powers. He’s not a God, he’s not a super soldier and he’s certainly not a giant green rage monster – Clint Barton is just an exceptionally skilled archer. How he deals with that fact is the core of this series, his missions seem almost secondary – which I’m completely OK with. Marvel has always been known for its strong character development, trying to make the heroes as relatable as possible in an effort to tie the story to the reader in the most emotional way possible. You could write a story about a hero constantly saving the day, taking out the villains over and over again but in the end, it’s the guy behind the mask that keeps the reader coming back and Fraction gives us that in a strong opening to his new project.

    I do have a few small complaints though. I absolutely loved David Aja’s work in the first three issues, giving it a style reminiscent of Sean Phillips (one of my favorites). What confused me was the sudden shift to Javier Pulido for issues four and five. Pulido isn’t bad per se, it just made me wonder where Aja went. The final chapter, which is an issue of Young Avengers Presents, seemed tacked on to pad out the book.

    I’m interested to see where things go from here. Bring on Volume Two!