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Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

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Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

Bewertungen:
4/5 (640 Bewertungen)
Länge:
114 Seiten
32 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736727434
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die junge Kamala Khan ist die nerdige Tochter pakistanischer Einwanderer in New Jersey. Sie steht total auf Ms. Marvel und die Avengers, schreibt Superhelden-Fanfiction – und hasst es, dass sie wegen ihrer Religion und Kultur von allen anders behandelt wird! Als sie unglaubliche Kräfte erhält, muss sie herausfinden, was Andersartigkeit wirklich bedeutet ...
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736727434
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

G. Willow Wilson was born in New Jersey in 1982. After graduating with a degree in History and coursework in Arabic language and literature, she moved to Cairo, where she became a contributor to the Egyptian opposition weekly Cairo Magazine until it closed in 2005. She has written for politics and culture blogs across the political spectrum, and has previously written a graphic novel, Cairo, illustrated by M. K. Perker, and a series of comics based on her own experiences, for D.C. Comics.


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4.0
640 Bewertungen / 53 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    A teenager gets super powers.3/4 (Good).Great art, and a great character. It moves a little slowly - 4 issues before she even starts superheroing.
  • (3/5)
    Good story, but the art seemed wonky in a few panels.
  • (5/5)
    This was the first book that I read this year, and I absolutely adored it.

    G. Willow Wilson does a masterful job of creating a believable, compassionate and likeable character. Kamala Khan (how cool is that name?) is a lovely young woman who feels current. She's brave and vulnerable all at once and so easy to relate to.

    G. Willson Wilson writes very cleverly - she writes a particular kind of subversive, passive racism that feels modern that directly addresses a lot of popular myths about race and whether or not we're living in a post-racial society.

    Kamala Khan is sassy, she's sweet and she writes Avengers fan fiction. She's part of a whole generation of young people who are the children of immigrants or who live in a multi-cultural environment. Kamala Khan represents so much.

    This is a really well-produced comic. The panels are beautiful and really saturated with colour, it's well-polished and I'm so looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely love this Marvel character and I really hope she enters the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) at some point. I would love to see her team up with Spiderman, and can only imagine what the dialog between the two might be.
  • (5/5)
    #LitsyAtoZGN#booked2020#popsugar#beatthebacklistI waited entirely too long to read this. It was the title our winner chose last year for Letters about Literature, and I see why she was so in love with it. We see a girl being granted powers but warned that they are not all they are cracked up to to be. She leans quick, but she also learns slow. It was also awesome to see different representation in this cast from Marvel. I can’t wait to read book 2. And I really want a Marvel movie with this origin story and have her meet up with Tom Holland and Spiderman. Please make it happen.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure whether I adore this book or if I absolutely hate it.
    Hence the three indecisive stars rating.

    When I realized that the latest Ms Marvel is actually a Muslim Pakistani-American girl, I was so damn excited I started the comics right away. Despite being more into DC than Marvel since forever. But this was not something I could possibly ignore.

    I like the idea, I like the artwork, I like the diversity of this take on Ms Marvel, but there are a few things about Kamala that don't sit well with me. She was a little too whiny and annoying for mu liking especially at the start.
    But I must admit, she grew on me halfway through, mainly because she stopped being a whiny little dumbass.

    All in all, this looks very promising, I'd love to see more of this take on Ms Marvel and hopefully it'd get better with the following volumes.
  • (3/5)
    I was curious about this comic and since it came in the Hugo voter packet it was a good time to read it. Unfortunately the scan in the voter packet ruined any text except for the balloon speech so I had to check out a print edition from the library. This arc is mostly an origins story for Ms Marvel, Kamala is a typical teen girl testing the limits of her religious family upbringing. She sneaks out one night and is enveloped in a fog that transforms her into one of her favorite superheroes. There is a learning curve for Kamala since she needs to control the power of transformation she has and use it to fight crime. A nice start and I’ll pick up the next collection to see where it goes.
  • (5/5)
    I picked this book up because I liked the premise and thought it was quite unusual - an American Muslim girl navigating the world of Family, Religion, and being like everyone else finds herself with superpowers. This is her origin story, and what she does with them.I really liked the story. The illustrations are beautiful, the story catches the point of family vs independence perfectly. And, it tells a story of an average family. Kamala has a great personality, her friends are equally interesting. As for her family, they are well drawn and obviously love Kamala very much, even if they don't understand her. I will be reading more of these graphic novels in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this! I love Kamela and her family and friends. Having her be a superhero is an extra bonus, but I'd read about her even if she weren't!
  • (4/5)
    I'm not a fan of superhero comics, but I have a lot of friends who are, and I tend to hang out in circles where they're popular, so I manage to pick up a fair amount about them by sheer osmosis. And I'd certainly heard a lot of buzz about this one, mostly centered on the fact that the title character is a Pakistani-American Muslim girl, which is is apparently a first in comics history, and a welcome step in making the superhero scene a little more diverse. Which struck me as a laudable thing, but wasn't enough to make me want to run out and read it. But then I also heard that the main character, Kamala Kahn, was a fun, somewhat geeky, pop-culture-savvy heroine, and that did make me more interested. And then this first collected volume just sort of showed up on my doorstep -- this is a thing that happens to me with books -- so of course I had to read it.And I did enjoy it. Kamala is indeed a likeable, well-realized character, and the way she's written feels very clueful and real. There's some thematic stuff here, too, about the experience of being a child of immigrants, trying to figure out exactly how you fit in and how to be yourself when you're not quite like everybody else around you. It's not necessarily terribly subtle, but it's not clunky Afterschool Special stuff, either, and overall it works. The artwork is very well done, too.I'm not sure, though, whether I'll continue reading this series or not. This was a pleasant read, and I'm happy enough to have made Kamala's acquaintance, but it hasn't instantly converted me into a fan of superhero comics.
  • (5/5)
    The hype surrounding this comic was well justified, I couldn't put it down, it was, simply put, one of the best comics I've read in a very long time! Kamala Khan isn't anything special, she's a teenage girl living in Jersey and trying to come to terms with her Pakistani heritage. She desperately wishes to be thin, blond, popular, and to have superpowers just like her role models do. One night she gets her wish but she quickly discovers that there is more to life than being popular. She has to decide what she wants and who she really is. In the meantime she pairs up with her best friend Bruno to stop a bad guy, The Inventor, and in the process try to avoid getting grounded by her parents. A remarkable and empowering read, suitable for everyone!
  • (4/5)
    I really like that she's kinda goofy. And awesome and stubborn and wonderful.
  • (5/5)
    Kamala Khan is wonderful. One of the best new comics in YEARS.
  • (4/5)
    The first 5 episodes of the Ms. Marvel graphic novel series. Not being a big reader of graphic novels, I found it interesting. I liked the art work and story line as Kamala finds herself a superhero. She goes against her family's behaviors at time to rescue others but she does find a reason in the teachings her family instilled in her. She is trying to fit in but it is not easy when she is different, not only being a superhero but also being Muslim. I liked how she tries to do what is right even as she is battling bullies and cultural differences.
  • (5/5)
    Look, I'm not even going to try to deny how much I love this. I'm fangirling over Kamala and her story, and I don't care who knows it! Comics need more female characters. They need women who aren't wrapped in physics-defying costumes, blond and busty. Most of all, comics need main characters who are people of color. Check, check, and CHECK! Ms. Marvel: No Normal absolutely checks all of these things off, and it does it perfectly.

    I won't gush TOO much, but these panels are beautiful! If you read through this, slow down and soak it all in. There are funny and cute little additions in the backgrounds of panels that you can only appreciate if you take your time. I love how Adrian Alphona made Kamala so normal. So lovable, a little dorky, a little disheveled. She could be any one of us, on any normal day. You know, except with the super powers and all.

    Story wise, this is just a perfect introduction to Kamala and her Ms. Marvel beginning! I'm not super familiar with Captain Marvel. I don't know a lot about the Marvel universe in general, in fact. I still felt perfectly comfortable diving into this. I had some giggles, I had some happy sighs, and at the end I just wanted more.
  • (5/5)
    Aww man, I really love this. Wilson is a breath of fresh air, and so are all the characters she creates here.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this. It hit me in that emotional place where I want to believe in heroes and I just fucking loved it.

    I liked the art a lot, and I love Kamala and all her expressions and her big hat. She's adorable and brave and ... Emotional place, I said.
  • (4/5)
    Kamala Khan is a regular girl from a Muslim family in Jersey City, that is until one evening when she has bestowed upon her super powers and becomes the new Ms. Marvel. I'm not very familiar with the legacy of Ms. Marvel, so I came to this without any expectations, which was good and bad. Good because I didn't feel like they did anything "wrong" and a little bad because I didn't know what to expect from the character or what powers she has. She didn't let me down, though - Kamala is a great character who reacts very truthfully to the discovery of her own powers. Her family and friends are also very realistic and seemed like they could be found on any US street. Good start to a series/character that has the potential to become great.
  • (5/5)
    Awesome story, characters and illustrations. Marvel is really trying something new and exciting with this series.
  • (5/5)
    The first volume (collecting #1-5) of the latest Ms. Marvel comic book. The new Ms. Marvel is a sixteen year-old Pakistani-American Muslim girl named Kamala Kahn. I can't speak to how the new comic fits into the Marvel universe or how it retells or retools elements of previous Ms. Marvels because this is my first experience with Ms. Marvel, but I loved this. Kamala is immediately vibrant and interesting, her relationship with her family is compelling, and her attempts to figure out who she is--simply as a teenager growing up, as a member of an immigrant family, and as a newly "born" superhero--is fascinating reading. The story is great, and the artwork is wonderful (the jokes in the background are awesome--a fire extinguisher behind a store counter has a label that reads "Die Fire Die," a sign listing the hours a store is open reads "All of them," one of Kamala's textbooks is titled "All Sorts of Math"). Exciting artwork, good story, and a diverse heroine? I'm in.
  • (5/5)
    I'd have given it 5 stars, but I have a deep antipathy for stretchy superpowers.
  • (3/5)
    I was super impressed with this book. Kamala is real and likable as are her friends and family. I like that her powers are not identical to Ms. Marvel's and that she is shaping up to be her own hero.
  • (5/5)
    Representation matters, and is so well done (in my opinion) with this comic. Kamala Khan is a wonderful addition to the Marvel universe, and the best person to take up the Ms. Marvel moniker. She is the next generation of superhero, and it looks so promising. I adore her and the way this comic is.
  • (4/5)
    Might switch to five stars later. I really like this.
  • (4/5)
    I'm going to pretend I haven't seen/read the comments and reviews that basically boil down to "a Muslim American can't be a superhero, and because this story is about a Muslim American teen, it's not really a superhero book". Despite the fact that in many ways, this is Spider-man: family issues, school issues, identity issues, except it happens to be a female character who also happens to be a person of colour and a Muslim. There is nothing in the set of issues here that wouldn't be right at home wearing a different mask in Spider-man. He spends just as much time building up to getting the costume, just as much time or more actually becoming a superhero.

    I did find that this TPB stopped just where I wanted things to really begin for Kamala. It's a little too short, not giving me enough to really hold onto. I like Kamala, I like her family, I like the quirks of the art and what we've seen so far -- I just haven't seen enough yet to know how much I'm going to like it. This TPB is really just an origin story, and we have yet to see Kamala meet the wider world.

    It's great as an origin story, but I'm not hooked yet.

    And before you ask, Spidey took me a while too.
  • (5/5)
    Chafing against parental restrictions, sixteen-year-old Kamala Khan sneaks out to attend a party down by the river. But when she arrives she’s teased and tricked by some of the partygoers. She storms off, and as she does all of Jersey City is enveloped in a mist. Kamala passes out, but when she wakes up she discovers that she has the superpowers and body of Captain Marvel—sometimes, and then she’s just Kamala again, and then she transforms again. She finds herself with a very unique problem: how to get control of these powers and body changes?
  • (4/5)
    Read on November 03, 2014I liked this much more than the Captain Marvel trade I read last night. This is an origin story about a young girl who suddenly discovers she has superpowers and she then tries to figure out how to use them for good. This is definitely only the beginning of the story -- we meet what I assume to be the major villain very briefly. I'm looking forward to reading more about Kamala Khan.
  • (5/5)
    Very impressive GN character début. The lead character, Kamala Khan, is the Peter Parker of the modern era: teenage, fangirl, flawed, awkward, learning and heroic. The art reaches that deceptively easy-looking balance between realistic and cartoony with enough small-print detail ("Business Hours: All Of Them") to remind one favorably of a Sergio Aragones vibe. Go read it. Now.
  • (5/5)
    This was really great. The protagonist feels like a fully developed, complex character -- neither a one-dimensional stereotype of a Muslim girl, nor a generic superhero whose age, gender, and religion do not appear in the story. It /matters/ who Kamala is - this story could not be about someone else. (And there are several other Muslim characters, who have a range of opinions on things!)Also nice: the self-centered concern troll character who never listens to anyone else is shown for the asshat she is. "She's only being nice to be mean."
  • (3/5)
    2015-05-21: Enjoyable YA/preteen comic. Not bad but nothing I'd really be interested in following. I don't follow any other comics either so that's not entirely a condemnation of the comic.