Erfreu Dich an Millionen von E-Books, Hörbüchern, Magazinen und mehr

Nur $11.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

Vorschau lesen

Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

Bewertungen:
4/5 (810 Bewertungen)
Länge:
114 Seiten
32 Minuten
Freigegeben:
21. Okt. 2016
ISBN:
9783736727434
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die junge Kamala Khan ist die nerdige Tochter pakistanischer Einwanderer in New Jersey. Sie steht total auf Ms. Marvel und die Avengers, schreibt Superhelden-Fanfiction – und hasst es, dass sie wegen ihrer Religion und Kultur von allen anders behandelt wird! Als sie unglaubliche Kräfte erhält, muss sie herausfinden, was Andersartigkeit wirklich bedeutet ...
Freigegeben:
21. Okt. 2016
ISBN:
9783736727434
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

G. Willow Wilson was born in New Jersey in 1982. After graduating with a degree in History and coursework in Arabic language and literature, she moved to Cairo, where she became a contributor to the Egyptian opposition weekly Cairo Magazine until it closed in 2005. She has written for politics and culture blogs across the political spectrum, and has previously written a graphic novel, Cairo, illustrated by M. K. Perker, and a series of comics based on her own experiences, for D.C. Comics.


Ähnlich wie Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose

Ähnliche Bücher

Ähnliche Artikel

Buchvorschau

Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose - G. Willow Wilson

Sie haben das Ende dieser Vorschau erreicht. , um mehr zu lesen!
Seite 1 von 1

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Ms. Marvel 1 - Meta-Morphose denken

4.0
810 Bewertungen / 66 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Just as good as everyone suggested. Hard these days to establish a new superhero and do something genuinely original and unexpected. Kamala Khan is unlike every other character I've ever found in a mainstream superhero comic. Great characters, funny dialogue, a real treat.
  • (4/5)
    Funny and brilliant. I felt it brilliantly captured the awkwardness and strangeness of suddenly getting superpowers.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure how I feel about this comic. I very much like some of the artwork, it looks akin to Bill Sinkewicz at times. However, some of the writing: Having the heroine morph into the white blonde Captain Marvel at the beginning -- and be successfully heroic -- and then having her stop doing that and then struggling to be heroic I think has a different interpretation than perhaps was intended. I don't think they should have had that morphing happen *at all* and should have started with the struggle to be heroic at the outset. Also, I think some of the writing uses too much the surface culture and doesn't utilize some of the deep culture. I think it's been "washed." However, having said that, it is at least a start. I also have to admit that I am not at all familiar with the figure of Captain Marvel.
  • (4/5)
    Took me way too long to finally read this. Love the art, love the character, this is the future of comics I want to see.
  • (4/5)
    Thanks BookRiot for putting this in my Christmas Quarterly box. Loved it and will share it with my high school students. I like my comics packed like this. One story arc in one volume.
  • (4/5)
    I am not someone who usually reads comics, but this one is fun.
  • (4/5)
    Might switch to five stars later. I really like this.
  • (3/5)
    I'm new to the graphic novel universe, so this is a new thing for me to get used to.

    I love that Ms. Marvel isn't a blonde-haired, blue-eyed vixen. The diversity is refreshing. A girl getting used to having superpowers while dealing with a strict, conservative family is interesting to read. I'm looking forward to reading more.
  • (4/5)
    You guys, her fanfic! UNICORNS. Kamala is my favorite.
  • (4/5)
    Alright I'm in love with this book, any book that quotes Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure is a book I wanna read. The villain Doyle looks like one of the aliens from Gantz. I didn't care for the artwork when I first started reading this but it really grew on me by the time I'd finished the book.
  • (5/5)
    I'd have given it 5 stars, but I have a deep antipathy for stretchy superpowers.
  • (5/5)
    Ahhhhh yesssssssssss. Kamala is a delight and this story is a ton of fun. It's a thoughtful origin story with poignant cultural commentary. On to Volume 2, which is actually packaged up in Volume 1--thanks, library!
  • (4/5)
    This was really good! I had read the first two issues in this volume previously but this is the first time I had read this whole volume all the way through. I love the character of Kamala Khan and I love seeing her discover her powers. I always like superhero origin stories and this is a very good one. I like seeing Kamala interact with her family and friends and try to discover her place in the world. You can see how she wants to both be her own person but at the same time, she wants to make her family proud of her. Great comic and I loved reading it.
  • (3/5)
    A teenager gets super powers.3/4 (Good).Great art, and a great character. It moves a little slowly - 4 issues before she even starts superheroing.
  • (3/5)
    Good story, but the art seemed wonky in a few panels.
  • (5/5)
    This was the first book that I read this year, and I absolutely adored it.

    G. Willow Wilson does a masterful job of creating a believable, compassionate and likeable character. Kamala Khan (how cool is that name?) is a lovely young woman who feels current. She's brave and vulnerable all at once and so easy to relate to.

    G. Willson Wilson writes very cleverly - she writes a particular kind of subversive, passive racism that feels modern that directly addresses a lot of popular myths about race and whether or not we're living in a post-racial society.

    Kamala Khan is sassy, she's sweet and she writes Avengers fan fiction. She's part of a whole generation of young people who are the children of immigrants or who live in a multi-cultural environment. Kamala Khan represents so much.

    This is a really well-produced comic. The panels are beautiful and really saturated with colour, it's well-polished and I'm so looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely love this Marvel character and I really hope she enters the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) at some point. I would love to see her team up with Spiderman, and can only imagine what the dialog between the two might be.
  • (5/5)
    #LitsyAtoZGN#booked2020#popsugar#beatthebacklistI waited entirely too long to read this. It was the title our winner chose last year for Letters about Literature, and I see why she was so in love with it. We see a girl being granted powers but warned that they are not all they are cracked up to to be. She leans quick, but she also learns slow. It was also awesome to see different representation in this cast from Marvel. I can’t wait to read book 2. And I really want a Marvel movie with this origin story and have her meet up with Tom Holland and Spiderman. Please make it happen.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure whether I adore this book or if I absolutely hate it.
    Hence the three indecisive stars rating.

    When I realized that the latest Ms Marvel is actually a Muslim Pakistani-American girl, I was so damn excited I started the comics right away. Despite being more into DC than Marvel since forever. But this was not something I could possibly ignore.

    I like the idea, I like the artwork, I like the diversity of this take on Ms Marvel, but there are a few things about Kamala that don't sit well with me. She was a little too whiny and annoying for mu liking especially at the start.
    But I must admit, she grew on me halfway through, mainly because she stopped being a whiny little dumbass.

    All in all, this looks very promising, I'd love to see more of this take on Ms Marvel and hopefully it'd get better with the following volumes.
  • (3/5)
    I was curious about this comic and since it came in the Hugo voter packet it was a good time to read it. Unfortunately the scan in the voter packet ruined any text except for the balloon speech so I had to check out a print edition from the library. This arc is mostly an origins story for Ms Marvel, Kamala is a typical teen girl testing the limits of her religious family upbringing. She sneaks out one night and is enveloped in a fog that transforms her into one of her favorite superheroes. There is a learning curve for Kamala since she needs to control the power of transformation she has and use it to fight crime. A nice start and I’ll pick up the next collection to see where it goes.
  • (5/5)
    I picked this book up because I liked the premise and thought it was quite unusual - an American Muslim girl navigating the world of Family, Religion, and being like everyone else finds herself with superpowers. This is her origin story, and what she does with them.I really liked the story. The illustrations are beautiful, the story catches the point of family vs independence perfectly. And, it tells a story of an average family. Kamala has a great personality, her friends are equally interesting. As for her family, they are well drawn and obviously love Kamala very much, even if they don't understand her. I will be reading more of these graphic novels in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this! I love Kamela and her family and friends. Having her be a superhero is an extra bonus, but I'd read about her even if she weren't!
  • (4/5)
    I'm not a fan of superhero comics, but I have a lot of friends who are, and I tend to hang out in circles where they're popular, so I manage to pick up a fair amount about them by sheer osmosis. And I'd certainly heard a lot of buzz about this one, mostly centered on the fact that the title character is a Pakistani-American Muslim girl, which is is apparently a first in comics history, and a welcome step in making the superhero scene a little more diverse. Which struck me as a laudable thing, but wasn't enough to make me want to run out and read it. But then I also heard that the main character, Kamala Kahn, was a fun, somewhat geeky, pop-culture-savvy heroine, and that did make me more interested. And then this first collected volume just sort of showed up on my doorstep -- this is a thing that happens to me with books -- so of course I had to read it.And I did enjoy it. Kamala is indeed a likeable, well-realized character, and the way she's written feels very clueful and real. There's some thematic stuff here, too, about the experience of being a child of immigrants, trying to figure out exactly how you fit in and how to be yourself when you're not quite like everybody else around you. It's not necessarily terribly subtle, but it's not clunky Afterschool Special stuff, either, and overall it works. The artwork is very well done, too.I'm not sure, though, whether I'll continue reading this series or not. This was a pleasant read, and I'm happy enough to have made Kamala's acquaintance, but it hasn't instantly converted me into a fan of superhero comics.
  • (5/5)
    The hype surrounding this comic was well justified, I couldn't put it down, it was, simply put, one of the best comics I've read in a very long time! Kamala Khan isn't anything special, she's a teenage girl living in Jersey and trying to come to terms with her Pakistani heritage. She desperately wishes to be thin, blond, popular, and to have superpowers just like her role models do. One night she gets her wish but she quickly discovers that there is more to life than being popular. She has to decide what she wants and who she really is. In the meantime she pairs up with her best friend Bruno to stop a bad guy, The Inventor, and in the process try to avoid getting grounded by her parents. A remarkable and empowering read, suitable for everyone!
  • (4/5)
    I really like that she's kinda goofy. And awesome and stubborn and wonderful.
  • (5/5)
    Kamala Khan is wonderful. One of the best new comics in YEARS.
  • (4/5)
    The first 5 episodes of the Ms. Marvel graphic novel series. Not being a big reader of graphic novels, I found it interesting. I liked the art work and story line as Kamala finds herself a superhero. She goes against her family's behaviors at time to rescue others but she does find a reason in the teachings her family instilled in her. She is trying to fit in but it is not easy when she is different, not only being a superhero but also being Muslim. I liked how she tries to do what is right even as she is battling bullies and cultural differences.
  • (5/5)
    Look, I'm not even going to try to deny how much I love this. I'm fangirling over Kamala and her story, and I don't care who knows it! Comics need more female characters. They need women who aren't wrapped in physics-defying costumes, blond and busty. Most of all, comics need main characters who are people of color. Check, check, and CHECK! Ms. Marvel: No Normal absolutely checks all of these things off, and it does it perfectly.

    I won't gush TOO much, but these panels are beautiful! If you read through this, slow down and soak it all in. There are funny and cute little additions in the backgrounds of panels that you can only appreciate if you take your time. I love how Adrian Alphona made Kamala so normal. So lovable, a little dorky, a little disheveled. She could be any one of us, on any normal day. You know, except with the super powers and all.

    Story wise, this is just a perfect introduction to Kamala and her Ms. Marvel beginning! I'm not super familiar with Captain Marvel. I don't know a lot about the Marvel universe in general, in fact. I still felt perfectly comfortable diving into this. I had some giggles, I had some happy sighs, and at the end I just wanted more.
  • (5/5)
    Aww man, I really love this. Wilson is a breath of fresh air, and so are all the characters she creates here.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this. It hit me in that emotional place where I want to believe in heroes and I just fucking loved it.

    I liked the art a lot, and I love Kamala and all her expressions and her big hat. She's adorable and brave and ... Emotional place, I said.