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House of M

House of M

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House of M

Bewertungen:
3/5 (178 Bewertungen)
Länge:
192 Seiten
39 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736726437
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Vor dem Civil War war House of M! Seht die Rächer und X-Men vereint, im Kampf gegen ihre größte Bedrohung: Wanda Maximoff! Die Scarlet Witch ist außer Kontrolle und das Schicksal der Welt liegt in ihren Händen! Und nichts wird mehr sein, wie es war! Der Mega-Event, der Geschichte schrieb! In einem Band!
Freigegeben:
Oct 21, 2016
ISBN:
9783736726437
Format:
Buch

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House of M - Brian Bendis

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über House of M denken

3.1
178 Bewertungen / 10 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Set in the months following the events of "Avengers Disassembled," this arc addresses the team's need to deal with the perpetrator -- and just when something is about to be decided, Wolverine wakes up in an entirely different world in which he is, you know, dating Mystique and basically being Nick Fury. He and a young girl are the only ones who remember the world as it once was and must call everyone back together to fix things. I'm a total sucker for alternate universe stories, and this one is a doozy. After all, everyone's happy: does the world really need to be fixed?
  • (4/5)
    I typically find stories involving the X-Men to be overly complicated and draw upon too many elements from it's extremely long and convoluted mythos. As such, I tend not to enjoy them. However, a number of comic books I've been reading lately have been referencing the House of M storyline, and I also know that the upcoming X-Men film and the next Avengers film will both have Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch, so I figured it was time for familiarize myself a bit with the characters. The only other experience I've had with them has been in The Ultimates, where it's strongly implied that the two siblings are fucking each other.

    Anyway, the house of M takes a little while to get going. There's quite a lot of time spent giving backstory, but these issues combined with the background text on the first page of each issue actually got me up to speed enough to follow the story without problems, which I appreciate as a casual follower of the X-Men.

    The main story is that the Scarlet Witch, who has the power to warp reality, creates a new reality where mutants are no longer subjugated and despised, but in fact are considered the next step in human evolution. Humans ("sapiens") are now the oppressed group. It's basically everything Magneto ever wanted.

    This premise is extremely interesting. The characters don't have any idea that reality has been warped, so we get to see how this new reality affects the relationships between Hank Pym and Henry McCoy, or how SHIELD works now that it's run by mutants including Wolverine, Rogue, and Mystique. The most interesting twist was that Peter Parker is happily married to Gwen Stacey, who never died, and they have a child together. Spiderman is beloved by New York, something of a celebrity. These moments of the book work extremely well, they really give some insights into the characters.

    Unfortunately, the arc doesn't spend anywhere near the amount of time exploring this reality as it did setting up the backstory for it to happen in the first place. In fact, within the very issue that the reality is created, Wolverine somehow realizes that reality has been changed, and sets about fixing it. Okay, fine, so Wolverine is the one guy and nobody else will believe him, right? Nope, Wolverine runs into a group of people who believe the same thing, and they happen to have with them a mutant child whose power just so happens to be making people instantly realize when reality has been altered. The group literally just goes around meeting important X-Men and Avengers characters, and then there's one frame of the girl with her eyes glowing green (indicating that she has made the character aware), and then a few frames of the character being all pissed off that their life is a lie. Then they say something along the lines of "I'm going to kill the Scarlet Witch for this!" and go to find the next character.

    By the end of this process they've basically convinced half of the X-Men/Avengers characters that their reality is a lie. Then, for some reason, Cyclops announces how important it is that they fight the other half of the character roster, and that "nothing be held back" for the battle. So this extremely interesting premise devolves into a stupid bunch of punches and "Krakoooom"-style brawls. Then something happens to conclude the brawl that has had far-reaching effects in the current Marvel continuity, which is what I read about in other books and made me decide to read this one, and I won't spoil it here.

    This book is such a missed opportunity. What a fascinating situation to find the characters in, a sort of "What-If" story that actually takes place in the mainstream continuity. It would have been great to see these characters truly reacting to this new world for longer, see how it affects them, but the book is in such a rush to get to a bunch of people punching each other that it really squanders what it has.

    When Peter Parker's eyes are opened, I was certain he was going to look at his new life, loved by his city, married to his original sweetheart, and father to a toddler, that he wasn't going to be willing to alter reality. Maybe that he'd find new reality so much better that he couldn't get on board with going back to the way things were. But no, his immediate reaction is that Scarlet Witch is an asshole and he wants to kick her ass for this. Really, Pete? Going back means that your FUCKING SON CEASES TO EXIST. Not even a little hesitant to do that? Seriously?

    There is a brief discussion where one character suggests maybe leaving reality the way it is, but her word bubbles are literally interrupted with another character saying it's out of the question, and it's never brought up again. There are so many opportunities to ask interesting questions and explore these characters, and they're all wasted.

    Despite being a general disappointment, the book is still, on the whole, worth a read. Though the moments of character exploration in this alternate reality are few and far between, they are extremely engaging and interesting. It does a good job getting people caught up if they're casual readers, and the story has a devastating finale whose effects are still being felt in the Marvel Universe today.
  • (5/5)
    Hot dang, I see why Layla Miller is Syl's favorite mutant.
  • (4/5)
    Every time anyone puts down Wanda's power, I just glare at them and repeat "House of M" until they give in.
  • (5/5)
    At the urging of my fiance, I finally read House of M and I'm so upset that I didn't do it sooner. Superbly written, House of M chronicles the aftermath of the deaths of the Avengers at the hands of Scarlet Witch. At this point, Wanda Maximoff is so distraught from what she has done that she is losing her grip on reality and control of her reality-altering powers. When the New Avengers, X-Men and various friends meet to decide Scarlet Witch's fate, her brother, Quicksilver, decides to take matters into his own hands by convincing Wanda to alter reality for good and give everyone exactly their hearts' desires. However, this new reality soon emerges as not the utopia that it seems. Headed up by Wolverine, a group of mutants fights to return the world to what it had been, but not without one last reality-shattering consequence.House of M is a quick read with a fast, thrilling pace. There are multiple anthologies to pick up to get a fuller, more robust understanding of the story, but this one does a good job at giving the readers a starting overview of one of the most devastating changes in the history of the 616 Marvel Universe. I'd definitely say that House of M is a must-read/must-have for any true Marvel Comics fan!
  • (4/5)
    This was a cool idea, kind of a "what if", but I was thrown by the ending, not sure what to think now. So I guess I'll need to read some "House of M" spin-offs to see if that helps. I love comics with tons of heroes and this definitely fit the bill. Unfortunately the fight scenes were really short and not very exciting.
  • (5/5)
    I started reading Marvel trades (comic collections) with Siege, when I decided to jump back in time and read all the main "events" in sequence. House of M takes the idea flirted with in "Disassembled" to the extreme. Wanda, The Scarlet Witch, has gone insane and completely changed reality!The story opens with the X-Men, including Charles Xavier, and the Avengers meeting to determine the fate of Wanda, who has become a danger to everyone. She caused the death of 3 Avengers, and injured many more. The story sets a dark tone right away as Emma Frost advocates for "putting her down". However, the group is split over a course of action. Meanwhile, Pietro has gone to his sister because he knows they may kill her. Suddenly, everything goes white and the world changes.This event takes the 'What If' concept and gives it full measure. What if mutants ran the world? What if Gwen Stacy and Uncle Ben didn't die? What if Dr. Strange was never in that accident? Would they all be truly happy? Wolverine (somewhat inexplicably) knows the world is not right. When he runs into a strange mutant child, Layla, she reveals the way the world should be. Wolverine then sets out to find his allies and cause them to remember. When they confront Wanda, the world's fate hangs in the balance.Before reading this, I had heard a lot about how amazing this event was, and what a game changer it is. All of which is true. Not only does it leave the X-Men forever altered, and the Avengers somewhat broken, it obviously lays the groundwork for Civil War: many of these "heroes" have extremely dangerous powers which begs the question, Who Watches the Watchmen? Overall, I think House of M is fantastic, with stunning artwork to complement a brilliant storyline. I can see why Bendis and Coipel have such a great reputation. Highly recommended!
  • (3/5)
    House of M actually seems a bit old hat, coming to it after I've already read other crossover events and the aftermath of House of M, The Children's Crusade. I'm trying to fit it together with some of the other comics I've read, and I'm a little unsure -- Wanda's children, how do they end up being Billy and Tommy from Young Avengers? When does that happen? That's not really explained to my satisfaction anywhere in the story.Did like the cast here, though it feels a little crowded. Spider-man gets some good lines, and I love that Ms. Marvel's pretty important in this world. I'm not a big fan of Wolverine, and I don't know much about Emma Frost, so their prominence wasn't especially helpful for me.All in all, it felt frenetic, more than a little crowded. I didn't need background from other comics for it, but it felt like I would've liked it: so many people were referred to glancingly, and I know so little about them, or what I know is from Ultimates, or...Anyway, it's fun, but not an essential, I think.
  • (4/5)
    Wanda Maximoff, the Scarlet Witch (and daughter of Magneto), has lost her grip on reality and become a very powerful cannon with a very short and twitchy fuse. Just as the Avengers (and other assorted heroes) go to her to assess the situation before possibly voting on a pre-emptive execution, she alters reality to fit her psychosis, and that of everybody else also. Peter Parker is married to Gwen, who didn't die. Scott Summers is married to Emma Frost, the White Witch. Mutants are now the dominant force on the planet. Eventually Logan realizes how reality has been altered, and starts recruiting other heroes with the help of a young psychic mutant girl, to re-awaken their memories of the old reality and take on Magneto, who is now Lord Magneto. Peter Parker's response to his recovered memories is quite poignant.The heroes go to Genosha for a showdown against the House of M, and the re-set is reversed... but not without massive consequences that will reverberate throughout the Marvel universe, if this story is considered a part of the prime story arc. Getting so hard th keep track nowadays.
  • (3/5)
    Following the death of the Avengers, an emotionally damaged Wanda Maximoff creates a world where mutants are celebrated and Eric Magnus of Genosha is a powerful world leader. Only Wolverine, who normally has no memory of his past, and a mysterious child remember the world as it was. Following her attacks on the Avengers as part of the Avengers Disassembled storyline, Wanda Maximoff (the Scarlet Witch) is rapidly loosing her grip on reality. Taken by her father, Magneto, to Genosha, she remains in an artificial sleep, while Charles Xavier and Dr. Strange attempt to help her. However, Xavier fears that she is growing more powerful, and calls a meeting of the New Avengers, the disassembled Avengers and the X-Men to discuss what to do with her. The teams deliberate if killing Wanda is the right choice. Eventually, the group travels to Genosha, only to find Wanda & Magneto missing. They track them to a ruined church and then in a blaze of white, the world changes. In this new world, mutants are respected and humans are looked on as inferior. Eric Magnus of Genosha is a world leader, and the world is preparing for a gala celebrating him. Spider-man is married to Gwen Stacy, Carol Danvers is Capt. Marvel, Cyclops and Emma Frost are married, Gambit is a criminal, Steven Strange is a psychologist, Luke Cage is a crime lord, and Wolverine is known as James and is head of S.H.I.E.L.D. It soon becomes apparent that Wolverine is the only member of the group at Genosha who remembers the world as it was. As he scrambles to find his teammates, he realizes that Charles Xavier does not exist in this reality. As he is pursued by S.H.I.E.L.D., he meets with Luke Cage, who, with the help of a mutant girl named Layla Miller, remembers the world as it was. The two then theorize that Magneto used Wanda's abilities to change reality to his desires, and give the world's heroes what they most want. Wolverine then sets about regathering the X-Men and Avengers, and traveling to Genosha to confront Magneto.As crossover events go, this could have been worse. The artwork in this is beautiful, softly colored and fluid. The hardcore Marvel Zombie would probably eat this book up with a spoon, along with it's seemingly innumerable spin offs. The interesting part of this title is seeing the various heroes in the alternate world, and therefore getting a glimpse of what it is they truly want. Unfortunately, these moments are small as the overriding plot of getting to Genosha and confronting Magneto sweeps them aside. Of course, to someone with a casual interest in Marvel, like myself, these moments are less compelling. Bendis handles the dialog competently, and the irony of Wolverine being the one who remembers is nicely handled. Overall, not bad, but of limited interest to those without a strong foundation in the Marvel Universe.