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Serenity - Zwischen den Welten, Band 1: Bessere Zeiten

Serenity - Zwischen den Welten, Band 1: Bessere Zeiten

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Serenity - Zwischen den Welten, Band 1: Bessere Zeiten

Bewertungen:
3/5 (697 Bewertungen)
Länge:
161 Seiten
28 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 17, 2015
ISBN:
9783736707559
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

DER OFFIZIELLE COMIC ZU JOSS WHEDONS SPACE-WESTERN! In einem Universum, in dem die Herzen und Gemüter so düster wie das Weltall selbst sind, versucht die Crew des kleinen Firefly-Klasse-Raumschiffs Serenity Jobs an Land zu ziehen, die es ihnen ermöglichen, den größten Luxus ihrer Zeit zu garantieren Frieden. Doch das Schicksal hat andere Pläne für die bunt zusammengewürfelte Crew aus Söldnern, Gesetzlosen und Flüchtlingen. Das Bindeglied zwischen Joss Whedons TV-Serie Firefly und dem Kinoblockbuster Serenity! Der Comic-Topseller aus USA endlich auf Deutsch!
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 17, 2015
ISBN:
9783736707559
Format:
Buch

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  • (3/5)
    Being a Firefly fan, i was very excited when, back in 2005, Dark Horse Comics announced and released Those Left Behind, the first of a possible series of Serenity comic books.I am not much of a comics reader, i go through phases where months of absorption will occur, but generally, i stick to 15-20 issues a year. i help off on reading the Serenity comics knowing that 3 issues would only wet my appetite, with months before more would be available.after three years, DHC released the next installment (three years folks, that was NOT a typo). Better Days came out, and again, i said, “bottom of the pile..”. i was itching to read them, but at this point, my browncoat soul was “okay” with waiting. i figured, eventually, i would borrow them from the bunny, or SamuraiShy.. It was again, put off. buried at the bottom of the “to be read” pile.finally, i broke down and located a copy for consumption. good, goddamn.. how disappointing could these have turned out?both comics exist in the blanks plot canvas between the end of the Firefly Series and the Serenity movie. with the number of questions fans were left with after series “completion” i was expecting to have a bone thrown to me, but.. nope. didnt happen. one of the tri-part comics was decent, the other was, well.. read on to get my true opinion.Better days, the second set to be released, happens before Those Left Behind. so far as i am concerned, Better days should be renamed “better never made”. characters were thrown in that had no frame of reference. the story was loose and thrown out with no real cohesion. i had to read it twice through, then jump online and consult wikipedia to figure out the remainder i could not muddle through. instead of plot closure, new info was tossed in that opened plot doors. it is in essence, nothing more than firefly porn, with all of us fans providing the money shot directly into Whedon’s pocketbook.seriously, never should have been made. the only saving grace of the thing was a single page image of River Tam, which i am including at the bottom of this post (see FNORDinc for image) to save everyone the waste of time getting to it. do not let it fool you. one page is not worth suffering through the rest. a job goes better than expected, and everyone is rich. they are all describing what they will do with their cut. River’s description of the perfect life was a single page and the only one worth looking at.~~Those Left behind, the first comic released, wasnt so bad,it was an enjoyable read. in all, it has a lot of the same issues Better Days had. there was no closure, new questions arise, but you do begin to understand why Inara and Book left Serenity and are separated in the film.. in the end though, it was a quick and mellow read with no real high or low points worth pointing out. it was almost like watching a well done episode, each character got some face time.ultimately, nothing but geek porn, but enjoyable on a base level.It was announced a few years back that there would be a new comic coming out focusing on Shepard Book and all of his mystery. this is yet to come to fruition after two years. to be fair though, if it ever comes out at all, following the above trend, it will be another year, and will not be worth picking up except to place on a shelf next to your firefly lunchbox and Mal Reynolds action figure.--xpost RawBlurb.com
  • (5/5)
    Love my Firefly and just about everything to do with it. I do wish that it had been a bit longer and added more details but I guess that's the nature of a graphic novel. Bring on more!
  • (4/5)
    Serenity: Those Left Behind contains the first three issues of what may be a continuing comic series set in the Firefly/Serenity 'Verse. To me, it seems to be set up very much like a Firefly episode, jumping right into the action and story line. These three comics form a bridge between the Firefly television series and Serenity, doing a nice job of explaining how the crew got to the point we find them in the movie. The art is great (mostly) without being exceptional, likewise with the story itself. Overall, the book is great fun, although very short. A definite read for fans.Experiments in Reading
  • (4/5)
    The crew of Serenity deals with an enemy from their past.I wasn’t too sure what to expect, going in, but this was fantastic! It reads just like an episode of Firefly, translated into graphic novel form. The script is really nicely done, the pacing is good and the art stays true to the characters. It was a quick, fun read that serves as a bridge between the end of the series and the movie. Whedon doesn’t really introduce anything new, so readers looking for new insights may be disappointed, but those who don’t mind more of the same should enjoy this.Definitely recommended for Firefly fans, but since there’s a lot of implied backstory I’m not sure that general readers would get much out of this.
  • (2/5)
    This is backstory pure and simple. No plot, no character development — just an explanation of how things got to be the way they were between the end of the series and the beginning of the movie. Not even a very satisfying explanation. Still, the writing was Whedon, and the artwork was awesome. A pleasant way to spend a half-hour.
  • (2/5)
    Show and movie were incredible. This was so-so.
  • (4/5)
    This comic takes place between the ending of the television series (which I never did get to*) and the movie, Serenity, and gives us some insight into the events not entirely addressed in either place. Here we join the gang in the midst of a heist gone wrong (big surprise there LOL!) and move on to a revenge plot to seek and destroy Mal. I really did enjoy this particular story and for all that it was pretty short, each character got a little play time. I didn't find the artwork offensive (American comics/manga artwork just doesn't usually appeal to me for some reason) and I was appreciative of how close the artist here got to Nathan Fillion's true look, although I think they paid more attention with him than maybe some of the other characters. I also enjoyed Nathan's narrative contribution before the comic.This is certainly a great addition to any Joss Whedon or Firefly fan's collection and is even interesting to those of us who have a passing interest in the show.*my collection of shows/movies to watch doesn't quite equal my tbr pile of books to read, but is still pretty hefty.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: Set after the last episode of Firefly and before Serenity the movie, Those Left Behind goes a long way to filling in that gap in the storyline of everybody's favorite space cowboys. After (yet another) job goes south, Mal and his crew once again find themselves low on cash and high on tension. They're at desperate ends - desperate enough to accept another job from Badger - during which they run up against an enemy from their past while barely staying one step ahead of the Feds.This volume also includes a foreword by Nathan Fillion and a memo from Joss Whedon to the Serenity production team describing the Firefly universe.Review: Those Left Behind is meant to be interstitial, to fill in fans as to how things got to be the way they are at the beginning of the movie - in particular, the circumstances surrounding Shepherd Book and Inara's departures. However, even if its main purpose is gap-filling, there still could have been a little more story to the story; the plot here is about that of an average Firefly episode, and while it probably would have been fine on film, it felt a little bit thin on paper. The script and the dialogue were well-done; Firefly's got the most distinct patois of any of Whedon's shows, and the characters' distinct voices make the transition to paper well. However, I wasn't crazy about the artwork. There's a distinct range of how much characters look like themselves, from Book and Zoe, who are instantly recognizable in almost all of their panels, to Jane, who looks like a comic-ified version of himself (i.e. the head:bicep ratio is steadily decreasing), to Simon, who is identifiable only by his vests. All-in-all, though, it was an enjoyable read, even if it wasn't quite everything I'd hoped for. 3.5 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: For Firefly fans only; there's no backstory or explanation given for the newbies. For dedicated fans, though, it's a nice chance to spend some more time with Cap'n Tightpants and crew, whatever the reason.
  • (2/5)
    This comic is an extension of the amazing TV show Firefly, cancelled well before it’s time. I was so excited to find that the story continued! I’ve also been looking for a comic to try for my genre challenge, so it was perfect. For those of you unfamiliar with the show, it’s basically a western crossed with a space opera and follows a group of renegades from the Alliance which controls most known planets. The characters are definitely the real selling point and the show was both hilarious and awesome.

    The comic is prefaced by a great letter by the actor Nathan Fillion and includes periodic divisions with drawings of the main characters. These were some of my favorite parts. Some of the drawing is good and some of it isn’t, but the majority of the story is drawn in a style I enjoyed. I especially liked that the drawing was fairly realistic, since it better captured the feel of the show. The story itself picks up with a lot of the plot points left hanging by the premature ending of the tv show, although it doesn’t resolve any of them in this first book.

    Unfortunately, I don’t think comic books are really my thing. The way the writing is broken up, a little bit on each panel, made it harder for me to get into the story. I also felt like the action scenes, depicted as a series of stills, were harder to follow than either a tv show where you can watch the action happen or a book where the action is explained clearly. Finally, while the plot length was comparable to that of an episode of the show, it felt shorter and less satisfying in comic form. I will, however, be giving a few more graphic novels and comics a chance to see if they grow on me.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (5/5)
    I LOVED this graphic novel! It was way too short. This storyline fills the gap between the Firefly series and the movie Serenity, explaining why Shepherd Book left, showed where they dropped off Inara, etc. I would buy a whole series of these no problem!
  • (5/5)
    This was a nice story in addition to the TV series and movie. I felt it was just another episode to the show. I loved the artwork as well. My hope is that they do not stop there and continue to create more stories. Very well done.
  • (5/5)
    Set between the end of the tragically short-lived Firefly sci-fi/western series and its movie spinoff Serenity, the story of Those Left Behind is a fun, well-written, and stunningly illustrated bridge between the two mediums, tying up some loose ends and plot arcs left by the series while effectively setting up moods and events for the film. Things are as bleak and desolate as ever for Serenity's crew, particularly its Captain, Malcolm Reynolds, whose continual hard luck and subsequent dark mood is driving his crew slowly away. When a "business associate" shows up with a job that looks too good to be true, Mal and company find they've been led into a trap sprung by an antagonist from the past, as well as an organization hell-bent on kidnapping one of Serenity's crew, a young girl with whose brain the government had been tinkering before she was rescued by her now-fugitive brother.Written by series creator Joss Whedon, who seemingly is incapable of writing anything bad, and with gorgeous artwork by the team of Will Conrad and Laura Martin, this graphic novel is a must-have for any of the many die-hard fans of this show and movie. As a standalone story it's obviously less appealing and perhaps a little more confusing, but it does make for an entertaining short read that has plenty of pretty artwork. The introduction by series actor Nathan Fillion and Whedon's Brief History of the Universe, Circa 2516 A.D. add perspective and depth to the story as well as the fictitious 'Verse from which everything hails.Definitely recommended for YA graphic novels section. The violence in the story is visible but mostly brief and not excessive or showy, while any sexuality in the story is suggested instead of portrayed, often for humorous effect.
  • (3/5)
    This graphic novel tries to bridge the gap between Firefly's last episoide and the film Serenity. Here's what it did for me, made me want more Firefly. I know Joss, you want to be done, but we want more!
  • (4/5)
    Serenity: Those Left Behind by Joss Whedon, Brett Matthews and Will Conrad (a graphic novel from Dark Horse Books) - The reader joins Captain Malcolm Reynolds of the Firefly-class starship Serenity and his renegade crew attempting to appropriate some supplies and money on the planet Constance. However, other renegades rob Serenity’s crew of their money and supplies and the Serenity gang must fight their way off the planet. Thus begins an appealing space opera as Mal and his renegades battle other villains as they voyage through space looking for other lucrative opportunities. We also meet interesting characters including Shepard Book, Mal’s spiritual but combative friend, and Agent Dobson who wants Mal dead. This hardback includes beautiful color illustrations and complimentary readings, such as: An interesting introduction by Nathan Fillion, who played Malcolm Reynolds in the Serenity movie; a pre-production memo “A Brief History of the Universe, Circa 2516 A.D.”; and several extra art panels. This is an enjoyable graphic novel, especially for fans of the short-lived TV series and the movie.
  • (4/5)
    Bridging the gap between the end of the Firefly series and the movie Serenity, "Those Left Behind" answers the questions of when Inara left and why Book left. If this had been text only, it would have been a stretch to call this a short story, but being a graphic novel, the images add some length to the text, though it still lacks depth. The images themselves leave a great deal to be desired. I'm not a big fan of comic books. If Joss had taken the traditional Grapic Novel/Manga route, the images would have fit the story better and would have been more appreciated by me. But being a fan of Firefly and Joss Whedon, it is a necessary addition to my library and will no doubt become as beloved as the Firefly series itself.
  • (4/5)
    Takes place between the end of Firefly but before the movie Serenity. Inara continues her plans to leave. We are shown why Shepard Book left Serenity. Begins with a typical heist that does not go right. And we meet various other characters who create havoc for our friends, Badger and the Men in Blue Gloves. Nothing terribly special but a lot of fun revisiting the wonderful characters. The dialogue was written wonderfully, I could just hear the actor's voices in my head as I read. The artwork is quite good. Inara, Jayne and Kaylee are particularly close to their real live counterparts. Fun! Must read for fans.
  • (4/5)
    Bought and read it right after watching all the Firefly episodes on DVD so I was in the groove. The graphic novel made some leaps scene-wise, but probably because it was originally released as three short comic book episodes. I'd have preferred more depth, but it does serve as a transition piece (I think that was it's original intention as well) between the TV series and the movie Serenity - which I have to watch next!

    Spoilers...

    Why this graphic novel is a good transition to the movie is because it introduces the Operative, the principle antagonist of the film (or so I've read, I'm going to watch the movie soon, I promise). So I was surprised to learn that the 'blue hand duo' were not going to be in the film since they got blown up in this g/n. That was actually a disappointment since I thought for sure they were the real bad guys from the hospital where River was a guinea pig. Anyway, I hope the movie answers more of my questions!
  • (3/5)
    I'm a huge fan of Firefly and Serenity so it was very nice to receive this short graphic novel as an addition to my 2013 Secret Santa Gift. I slipped it into my briefcase and started reading it on a plane somewhere and then forgot all about it. As I was cleaning out my briefcase I saw it and thought, perfect, something for my Virago Secret Santa category.There's a wonderful introduction by Nathan Fillion and some gorgeous full page illustrations of each of the main characters scattered throughout. The story is a prequel to the movie Serenity. I like graphic novels and even though this is FIREFLY!!! I was disappointed. I could not follow along with exactly what was happening in the story - the illustrations were not clear enough to explain and the writing didn't fill in the blanks. I get what happened and why, but even with going back and looking very carefully at the illustrations, I definitely missed some details. I have not had this experience previously with graphic novels, so perhaps this is a one-off. So, I'll most likely give the next one in the series a try.
  • (2/5)
    Set between "Firefly"'s end and "Serenity"'s beginning, this short graphic novel doesn't contain any new characters or plot. (Although it does have the first Asian person to be seen in the 'verse.) The art's pretty good, and the writing is fine.
  • (3/5)
    *Book source ~ LibraryFrom Goodreads:Here's how it is -- in a universe filled with hearts and minds as cold and dark as the reaches of space, one small Firefly-class starship named Serenity takes its ragtag crew of mercenaries, outlaws, and fugitives in search of a job, any job, that'll earn them enough cash to afford that most elusive commodity -- peace.I’ll admit that I’ve only seen half of the first episode of Firefly and I’ve never seen the movie. I started the show, got interrupted and haven’t managed to get back to it yet. But I do intend to. I like the artwork. It’s detailed and the colors are pretty good. The characters also look enough like the show for me to distinguish who they are, but they’re not quite right. As for the storyline, I enjoyed it, but wasn’t overwhelmed. Firefly fanatics would probably love this, but I have no way of knowing.
  • (2/5)
    Very, very cool. Great feel.

    I was a little thrown by the chronology at first, but I think I'd place this between the final episode on the DVD and the movie. (The correlation of River and Drusilla, crazy girls who see the future, is increasingly apparent. Oh, Joss, you fiend!)

    In anycase! It's good to see the crew in their groove, pre-'Serenity: The Movie'. The hijinks of the series continue, everything is as it should be, and I'm glad I picked this up. Not too dark, like the movie, but not too safe, like some of those episodes. It's a good mix and a good introduction to the panels for these guys. The drawings are true to the actors but don't look like lifeless screenshots, Mr. Conrad has done a fine job.

    I feel though that this continuation is one long episode, it read quickly, but didn't have clear chapter breaks, as a collection from several comic series issues might. This makes stopping unweildly and a little like pausing a movie for an hour or two, the flow stops. As the flow in this is awesome, that is a bummer.

    Only other problem? I can no longer hear the mandarin curses, I can see some characters of words... But only gorram is spelled out for us. Since it's print, could we maybe finally see a translation of those curses?

  • (4/5)
    So, I had some library fines. A book that I checked out for Jefferson was left lying on the living room floor. Solomon picked it up, and with seemingly no effort at all, popped one of the sections right out of the binding. I inquired at the library, and there was no repair option. Basically, I had to pay $20 to replace the book. I spent a lot of time grousing and contemplating options and avoiding the library entirely until one night my husband asked if I would be willing to donate $20 to the library. "Of course!" I answered. So he suggested I take a twenty to the library for the fine and tell them to keep the change as a donation. Somehow that changed it entirely, and off to the library I went.

    My brother-in-law came along to pick out some dvds, and as I made my selection immediately, I got bored waiting for him and started to wander. And finally found the adult graphic novel section! (Not "adult" as in "naughty," of course, but "adult," as in not children's or young adult.) I circled the stacks and was delighted to find a copy of Buddha, Vol. 3, the next in the series that I hadn't read. Inspired by this success, I tromped over to the young adult graphic novel section and checked out the Whedon selection, as I had yet to read any of his comics and was curious. Of course, I ended up picking up this copy of Serenity.

    It's strange, switching to a comics format after a much-beloved TV series. Both genres are of course so visual, and it took a little bit of time to get used to the artist's renderings of such familiar characters. In particular, there was one character who was not a regular, but had only previously appeared in a single episode. He was referred to by name once, and it seemed familiar, but I was left examining his face for pages, hunting for clues that I had identified him correctly. What finally nailed it for me was the dialog. As soon as the character got a change to make a speech, I could hear his voice ringing in my ears.

    I do sympathize with the task of drawing for this kind of comic. Instead of getting to invent the look of your characters afresh -- to be bound to representing those characters as they were portrayed by actors. Certainly it's a skill I'm lacking. Some of the drawings were wonderful. But I can't keep from mentioning that in nearly every frame containing Simon my brain was screaming, "Who in the 'verse are you trying to draw here?"

    Anyway, it was interesting to get a glimpse of how the story moved from Point A (the end of the series) to Point B (the beginning of the movie). I know, sometimes such things are better left a mystery, but I can't look away. I'll have to go pick up the next in the series...
  • (5/5)
    Amazing and well-written (duh, Joss is Boss) but oh, it hurts a little to know (Like the CowboyBebop movie) that this takes place between what we already know, i.e., Firefly and Serenity.
    I miss all of the characters and this eases the hurtin' some.
    I think the only character that gets any sort of short shrift is River- it's difficult to convey Summer Glau's quirky/crazy/Cassandra-ness on a still page. But near the end... well, I won't spoil it, but anyone familiar with the show or the film will recognize how amazing River Tam can be... when she's not damagin' Jayne's calm, that is.
  • (5/5)
    The plot of Those Left Behind was probably intended to be an early-season-2 episode of Firefly that unfortunately was never shot. As such, it features a job gone bad, an enemy from the past, and some fancy fightin' and flyin'. This, of course, translates quite well to the graphic novel medium. The illustration and dialogue are both well done and true to the series. The true gem of this work, though, is Joss' Brief History of the Universe, Circa 2516. It explains a lot of things about his high-concept vision of Firefly and Serenity, and how the world came to be as it was. This information was never conveyed in the series explicitly, and although it was implied, it was quite nice to have it all spelled out. I am looking forward to future Serenity graphic novels, as I, like many others, feel the show was cancelled far to soon and there are plenty of stories left to tell about these characters.
  • (2/5)
    I had hoped for more from this graphic novel - a little bit of back story to some of the characters, or some character growth that would have been to slow-paced to put into series or film. But it was a standard Firefly episode: heist gone wrong, legging it out of town, dramatic take off, sexual tension between appropriate characters, random River eeriness, a trap, and escape.So, like a cup of tea with old friends, it was nice to see the characters again, but there was nothing new to fill me with wonder.
  • (3/5)
    I wasn't going to review this, and really, there's no need of a review. However, I figure some of you will want to know about this and what's it about, so here's a mini review:Before the movie Serenity opened, there was a comic book mini-series that was published. The story is meant to bridge the gap between the television show Firefly and the movie Serenity. And, without giving too much away about the movie, the graphic novel does exactly that. If you've seen the movie, you get the title of this graphic novel immediately, though I have to say, it lets me down a little bit. The mini-series was just three comic books, and to be honest, they could've gotten away with more, telling a longer story and really giving fans something to settle into. The story goes by too fast, but it does it's job, which is to explain certain things about the movie.The art was good, though I couldn't stand the rendering of Inara, and the use of SUPER blue eyes at times was beyond annoying. Still, the story captures the flavor of the characters, which is most important. I had no trouble hearing the actors speaking the lines, and River was captured particularly well. The story also brings back a couple of baddies from the episode "Ariel", which was good to see.If you're a fan of Serenity the movie, get this. You can get it off Amazon or find it in your bigger bookstores. Also, note the number "1" on the spine of the trade. I haven't heard anything (though I don't follow comic book news), but I get the feeling there's going to be an actual comic book series with these characters. Or at very least, the universe. And in hindsight, I think that's a fair trade for the fans. While not every fan is a comic-book reader, this format does allow this universe to carry in a medium true to the show. Episodic, with quirks of humor and tales of deeper emotional peril. And of course, there's the adventure. If Whedon ever does do anything in television/film again with these characters, at least he'll have a chance to play with them in another format first. :)
  • (3/5)
    I think the biggest problem with this for me is that I just now got to read it; it may have had more of an impact if I'd actually read it BEFORE watching "Serenity," but alas. Post-movie, it's kind of pointless: it fills in some of the gaps between the series and the film, but not in any way the film fails to. The plot resurrects a character that in my mind should have stayed dead, only to kill him again, and makes very poor use of the Two by Two, Hands of Blue guys. Also, the art annoyed me. Some comic book artists are very good at conveying action, but the way the fights were drawn in this I couldn't actually figure out what was happening. I mean, I'm glad to have finally read this, I guess, but it was really not worth the desperate efforts to get it over the *last several years*.
  • (4/5)
    I have a hardback copy with a lovely, lovely cover, with Mal and Jayne and Zoe on it. Lovely art. The art inside is good, too -- the girls are less well drawn than the men, generally, but for the most part they look very similar to the real people they're based on.

    The story is okay, but it feels a little bit rushed. There are some glorious lines, like Zoe's, "Or had you not noticed the colour the captain and I are partial to wearing?"
  • (2/5)


    Super short and nothing happens... But it is Firefly, so it wins points for that.
  • (3/5)
    I love Firefly, but this graphic novel didn't do much for me. It doesn't really add anything to the back story.