Erfreu Dich an Millionen von E-Books, Hörbüchern, Magazinen und mehr

Nur $11.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

De hominis dignitate. Über die Würde des Menschen: Zweisprachige Ausgabe

De hominis dignitate. Über die Würde des Menschen: Zweisprachige Ausgabe

Vorschau lesen

De hominis dignitate. Über die Würde des Menschen: Zweisprachige Ausgabe

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (2 Bewertungen)
Länge:
112 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 1990
ISBN:
9783787323203
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

In der Oratio de hominis dignitate (1486), nach Jacob Burckhardt "eines der edelsten Vermächtnisse der Renaissance", erklärt Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494) die Freiheit zum konstitutiven Element der Wesenswürde des Menschen, da sie es ihm erlaubt, das zu sein, was er will. Als produktiver Denker kann der Mensch dem Höchsten nachstreben und bis in die unmittelbare Nähe Gottes aufsteigen. Textvorlage für die Übersetzung war die der kritischen Ausgabe von Florenz 1942 folgende Ausgabe von Garin 1968. Die hebräischen Zitate wurden berichtigt, die Anmerkungen der Ausgabe von Garin entnommen. Mit Einleitung, Auswahlbibliographie und Namenregister.
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 1990
ISBN:
9783787323203
Format:
Buch


Ähnlich wie De hominis dignitate. Über die Würde des Menschen

Titel in dieser Serie (40)

Ähnliche Bücher

Buchvorschau

De hominis dignitate. Über die Würde des Menschen - Giovanni Pico della Mirandola

Sie haben das Ende dieser Vorschau erreicht. , um mehr zu lesen!
Seite 1 von 1

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über De hominis dignitate. Über die Würde des Menschen denken

4.5
2 Bewertungen / 2 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    A classic description of the "great chain of being," in which human beings are unique in their ability to change their ontological identities: descending lower than the beasts and/or ascending higher than the angels. Aren't we the lucky ones!
  • (5/5)
    Delivered in Rome in 1486 by a twenty-four year old scholar before a platoon of erudite theologians and philosophers, Oration on the Dignity of Man is clearly the masterpiece of Renaissance humanism. Della Mirandola's oration fearlessly prepares the ground for debate around the 900 theses he proposed to such an audience, with which he sought to ignite passionate, intellectual discourses on every subject relevant to man.The speech typifies the Renaissance mind and spirit, celebrating man's most precious gift from God – free will – and our divine potential for good. For della Mirandola, man was made unique in his capacity to choose between dwelling in the carnal, earthy world or to ascend into the heavenly spheres to reach a height that equals the cherubiums: “unable to yield to them” he calls, “and impatient of any second place, let us emulate their dignity and glory. And, if we will it, we shall be inferior to them in nothing” (13).Yet this brilliant soul proves to be quite a mystic as well, as it becomes known in the last twenty pages -- by delicately deviating from Christian doctrine, della Mirandola veers off into the territory of esotericism and the occult, peppering his discourse with mentions of the Kabbalah and gnostic references. He goes as far as to propose a philosophy based upon “divine arithmetic”, which extends the works of Pythagoras, while also defining the two branches of "magic" – that of demonic evil, and that of "the highest realization of natural philosophy" (53). Of course, his esoteric references make certain parts of the oration very inaccessible, but for myself, it exposed me to thinkers and philosophies unheard of, which only delighted me. In a time in which many of the respected thinkers rejected intimate examinations of non-Christian texts and doctrines, this man daringly calls upon those of us yearning to initiate into the spiritual realms, to explore different paths of knowledge to become “a pure contemplator…wholly withdrawn into the inner chambers of the mind” (11).