Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Meditationen: Mit sämtlichen Einwänden und Erwiderungen

Meditationen: Mit sämtlichen Einwänden und Erwiderungen

Vorschau lesen

Meditationen: Mit sämtlichen Einwänden und Erwiderungen

Bewertungen:
3/5 (324 Bewertungen)
Länge:
626 Seiten
13 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Sep 1, 2011
ISBN:
9783787322305
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

In den Meditationes de prima philosophia (1641) erweist Descartes die Tauglichkeit der von ihm gefundenen erkenntnistheoretischen Methode für die Grundlegung gewisser Erkenntnis.
Husserl über das Werk, das die Philosophie der Neuzeit begründete: "Die Cartesianischen Meditationes wollen nicht zufällige subjektive Besinnungen Descartes' sein oder gar eine literarische Kunstform für die Übermittlung der Gedanken des Autors. Vielmehr geben sie sich offenbar als die in der Art und Ordnung ihrer Motivation notwendigen Besinnungen, die das radikal philosophierende Subjekt als solches notwendig durchmachen muß [.] Darin also liegt die Ewigkeitsbedeutung der Cartesianischen Meditationes. Sie zeichnen [.] den notwendigen Stil des philosophischen Anfangens."
Die vorliegende deutsche Übersetzung enthält neben dem Haupttext sämtliche Einwände von Caterus, Mersenne, Hobbes u.a. sowie Descartes' Erwiderungen nach der Maßgabe des Textbestandes der lateinischen Erstausgabe von 1641 und der erweiterten zweiten Auflage von 1642. Grundlage für die Übersetzung bildet der lateinische Text in der Standardausgabe von Adam und Tannery, Bd. VII. Vergleichend hinzugezogen wurde die von Descartes selbst durchgesehene französische Übertragung der "Meditations Metaphysiques" von C. Lerselie R. (Paris 1647).
Freigegeben:
Sep 1, 2011
ISBN:
9783787322305
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

René Descartes, known as the Father of Modern Philosophy and inventor of Cartesian coordinates, was a seventeenth century French philosopher, mathematician, and writer. Descartes made significant contributions to the fields of philosophy and mathematics, and was a proponent of rationalism, believing strongly in fact and deductive reasoning. Working in both French and Latin, he wrote many mathematical and philosophical works including The World, Discourse on a Method, Meditations on First Philosophy, and Passions of the Soul. He is perhaps best known for originating the statement “I think, therefore I am.”


Ähnlich wie Meditationen

Titel in dieser Serie (40)

Ähnliche Bücher

Ähnliche Artikel

Buchvorschau

Meditationen - Rene Descartes

Sie haben das Ende dieser Vorschau erreicht. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen!
Seite 1 von 1

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Meditationen denken

3.0
324 Bewertungen / 7 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (1/5)
    Descartes is of course famous for “Cogito Ergo Sum”, or “I think, therefore I am”, an argument which is laid out in these meditations … and OK, if one needs to spend the mental energy to prove one exists, fine. Hats off to the man for thinking deep thoughts and putting quill to parchment in 1641. But he then builds upon this to “prove” that God exists. I won’t recreate that argument here because it’s ridiculous, and a good example of how a philosopher can wrap himself up too much in a pseudo-intellectual argument to reach his desired conclusion, whatever it might be. Of course the Meditations have value and a solid place in the history of Western Philosophy, but I’d recommend turning to the philosophy of the East instead. I got very little out of these writings.
  • (2/5)
    I think this is an important work to read if you're doing philosophy. I don't like Descartes' philosophy, personally, but his writing is relatively easy to read and he wrote some very important arguments that must be considered. For example, "I think therefore I am."

    I loathe his ontological argument beyond all believing, but don't mind me. You should read this and make your own decisions.

    Edit: Reread. Still don't like his philosophy, but it's easier to read when you read it all at once and sequentially.
  • (1/5)
    I don't doubt it is an important work in the development of 'The Great Conversation', but I rate a book according to how much I get out of it, and how much I enjoy it. It seems like a bit of a let down after reading Discourse on Method: but I suppose I should have taken the last 2 parts of that book (5 and 6) as a warning of what was to come. The first two meditations (again, of 6) to me are an echo of the Discourse; longer and less clear.

    There are good lines here and there, but after proving his own existence he goes off the 'right path'as he calls it, with his argument for god: I couldn't think of a perfect being unless there was one already. Simon Blackburn (Think, 1999) provides an excuse for Descartes, suggeesting that the idea of cause and effect have changed considerably since then: apparently at that point in history, whatever causes, neccesarily passes something on, like a baton in a relay race, to the thing it causes. I half-heartedly continued into meditation 4 onwards, but I began to skip sections once I found "God" coming up every two or three lines. A key point in our history, but not so accessible today. Discourse is lovely though!
  • (3/5)
    Well, it was cool until he ended up "deducing" the existence of God.
  • (2/5)
    Read for an on-line philosophy course. I doubt I would have made it through the first few pages without the encouragement of the professor, and I preferred his summary of the book to the actual book.
  • (3/5)
    It's a classic but... a tiresome and rather flawed attempt to prove the existence of god and everything else. If nothing else, it seems to show the powerful influence of the church's recent treatment of Descarte's contemporaries.
  • (3/5)
    Logical and critical, this book is a good primer for those interested in Descartes and further philosophy. I recommend it to those seeking knowledge, logic, and sagacity.