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Bewertungen:
3/5 (670 Bewertungen)
Länge:
93 Seiten
1 Stunde
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
27. Feb. 2014
ISBN:
9783864252440
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die Heerscharen Persiens - eine Streitmacht, so gewaltig, dass die Erde unter ihren Schritten erzittert - stehen bereit, Griechenland zu vernichten, eine Insel der Vernunft und der Freiheit inmitten eines Ozeans aus alter Mystik und Tyrannei.

Zwischen Griechenland und dieser Flutwelle der Zerstörung steht nur eine kleine Truppe von gerade einmal 300 Kriegern.
Doch diese Krieger sind mehr als nur einfache Männer - Es sind SPARTANER!

Die gefeierte Neuinterpretation der Schlacht bei den Thermopylen gilt als eine der besten Arbeiten der Comiclegende Frank Miller (SIN CITY) und wurde mit drei EISNER Awards ausgezeichnet. 2007 lieferte Regie-Neuling Zach Snyder die kongeniale visuelle Umsetzung des Comic-Stoffs und katapultierte sich mit dem stilprägenden Fantasy-Schlachtgemälde in die A-Liga Hollywoods. 2009 setzte er nach und adaptierte die als unverfilmbar gehandelte Graphic Novel WATCHMEN von Alan Moore.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
27. Feb. 2014
ISBN:
9783864252440
Format:
Buch

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Buchvorschau

300 - Frank Miller

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über 300 denken

3.0
670 Bewertungen / 18 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Fun and exciting. A worthwhile story to be told, though the omission of the Thespians and other abuses of artistic license mark the fault of Miller's sensationalism. Like the four-color comics before him, Miller takes archetypes and symbols and drives them full throttle to the epic, gun-blazing climax. Unfortunately, character and emotion suffer. This is not quite the liability that it could have been, as the Epic tradition is often purposefully guilty of the same and 300 fits into this traditio...more Fun and exciting. A worthwhile story to be told, though the omission of the Thespians and other abuses of artistic license mark the fault of Miller's sensationalism. Like the four-color comics before him, Miller takes archetypes and symbols and drives them full throttle to the epic, gun-blazing climax. Unfortunately, character and emotion suffer. This is not quite the liability that it could have been, as the Epic tradition is often purposefully guilty of the same and 300 fits into this tradition (or the modern swords & sandals permutation).

    However, when Miller is forced to give up some of his control, the improvement of realistic emotion shows how good his work can be. In The Dark Knight Returns, he had to keep much of the character's past and could not transform him entirely into an unfeeling, heroic killing machine. Likewise, in the film adaptation of 300, the actors and director helped to infuse the characters with more emotion and depth.

    All in all, 300 isn't a long enough read for Miller's drawbacks to really hurt it, and he picked a fittingly manly story to showcase his histrionic machismo.
  • (5/5)
    For fans of graphic novels or of classic Greece, this is a must. It is an exciting and beautifully illustrated tale of the 300 spartans and their allies who marched into the pass of Thermopylae against a force who would overwhelm and kill them. If you are a stickler for historical accuracy, hold your criticism long enough to consider the way stories were told in the time of Heroditus. The storyteller would have painted fantastic pictures of the heroes, villains, and events of the battle, not unlike those in this novel. With that in mind, I think this is an even more enjoyable yarn. Yeah, I said yarn.
  • (5/5)
    A gripping, bloodspattered masterpiece. To dwell on historical "inaccuracies" is to miss the point of this very stylized presentation of the Battle of Thermopylae entirely.
  • (5/5)
    have to grade on a graphic novel scale. great story, great illustrations. less homoerotic than the movie :)
  • (3/5)
    A fictional retelling of the story of the Battle of Thermopylae and King Leonidas of Sparta and how he gathered 300 of his best men to stand up against the Persian army. This story ignores a lot of the actual history of this battle and the preparation beforehand, but it makes for an impressive tale (as well as for one very aesthetically appealing film). I'm not a huge fan of Miller's and get slightly irked by some of his more slapdash story choices (such as describing how Spartans fight and then ignore his own words when drawing the same), but I do enjoy this story as long as I remember it's in the action genre, not history. I have to admit I'm partial to the film, though, mainly because of its very striking post-production effects. The movie has a permanent place in my shelves, but the book will go in the donation-pile, unfortunately.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting art and story now known to almost everybody - brave stand of 300 Spartans (plus hoplites from some allied states) against overwhelming odds of Persian army.Do not expect realistic drawings of Spartans and/or Persians because entire art feels like it comes from some dark fantasy universe. Very Interesting work.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great book (comic book). I studied it for one of my MA classes in history and the book has many political and social commentaries. The movie adaptation is AMAZING. The graphics are insane and the social and political commentaries are even that much more apparent. This book is a great addition to any book collection and will be a great companion to the DVD (which is bound to come out here in the semi-near future).
  • (4/5)
    If you've seen the movie than this book will feel differently to you. When I first read this book I read the main character as though he was Frank Millers Batman in ancient Greece. It's a good story but not so in your face as the movie is.
  • (3/5)
    300 was a pretty good book, it shows a lot of fighting and determination through out the situations of battling the Persians I feel it kind of told me in a way that will power is given to you, you have to create it for yourself. It really showed me that back then you have to push yourself no matter how bad it gets and in the end either it will all pay off or it may not go your way. Leonidas is a good leader and he shows alt of strength he has taught his team well and they are all strong. In the story it says that his wife says," A Spartan shows no emotion or any signs of weakness toward his lady or his team. A Spartan stays strong and shows his will power and strength through war and skills. My favorite part is when Leonidas turns down the offer of the Emperor and stays a strong man he will not give in to wealth or a life of luxury.
  • (2/5)
    I really loved the movie of this, but this book didn't quite fascinate me in the same way. Beautiful work though.
  • (5/5)
    Frank Miller's retelling of the Battle of Thermopylae, 300 was originally published as a limited series and later collected as a graphic novel. I'm fairly sure without further research of my own that Miller was rather liberal in his retelling. The story is quickly paced, leading from the events that sparked the battle to the defeat of Leonidas by Xerxes which prompts the Spartans to take arms against Xerxes and the Persian Empire.300 is illustrated in Frank Miller's typical, graphically strong style. Lynn Varley's colors help set off Miller's artwork appropriately, and overall the artwork compliments the story well.This is a very quick read, and if your only experience with 300 is the film version, you may be disappointed in this original print version, but it is still worth reading if you are interested in the graphic novel.
  • (4/5)
    If there's one thing Frank Miller is good at, it's atmosphere. His talent for creating living, breathing universes for each of his works shines through best in the story of the Battle of Thermopylae. First, to get the problem of Herodotus out of the way. The Battle of Thermopylae was recounted in The Histories and has been largely taken as the factual accounting of Sparta's valiant effort to hold off Xerxes and his forces. 300 does not assume to replace Herodotus, nor does it ever claim to be more than a story of what might have happened those days. Discuss amongst yourselves: What makes Herodotus' version anymore accurate than other accountings?Onto Frank Miller. This is the technicolor, hyper-testosteroned (my word), retelling of a story we've all come to know and love: the few against the many with impossible odds for nothing but the sheer glory and rightness of what they're doing. Miller tells this story in a brisk fashion, fleshing out Leonidas in ways that make him both more human and more of a larger than life myth than even Sparta could have hoped. This is a story of war and carnage with the backdrop of the Spartan way and nothing else. It's a graphic novel one simply sits back, takes it in and enjoys.
  • (4/5)
    I really loved this story. I do think that I prefer the graphic novel to the movie. It may just be that the graphic novel is a format that reminds me of being a child and reading the dry mythologies/stories of ancient Greece. The books lacked the richness of storytelling that they deserved. This will give you a much greater appreciation of the histories. You will wonder again about those hidden stories no one tells.
  • (3/5)
    I decided that I needed to read this graphic novel after watching the movie again recently. While this was a good read and captured some very tough and manly themes nicely, I felt the movie actually had more to it. I know that sounds laughable, but that's the way I feel about this.

    Either way this is a man book. Honour, courage, determination, pride, it makes you feel good to be a man!
  • (3/5)

    Six out of ten.

    The story of the Battle of Thermopolyae told in typical Frank Miller style.

  • (3/5)
    Leonidas leads 300 Spartan soldiers to war against the entirity of the Persian army. I can't say I'm the biggest fan of Miller's art work, but the story here is just as fast-paced and comic as the film. I'd rather watch the film, however.
  • (4/5)
    As a person who appreciates historical accuracy in media of any form, 300 had a strong chance of rubbing me the wrong way. Fortunately, I was able to put all notions of verisimilitude aside, and just enjoy the fantastic artwork and outrageous exaggerations of adventure. I recommend watching the film "The 300 Spartans" and then read the book, since it is the film that inspired Miller to draw the comic. Then go see the new film 300. Despite the fact the half of the plot devices and events in the book never happened, the story is remarkable for its surrealism, sweeping vistas and silhouettes, and grand battle scenes. The overall message: Futile resistance is sometimes a very beautiful thing. In this world where scenes of altruistic sacrifice are rare, it helps to see such an example targeted towards the audience that probably needs to see it the most: American male youths. I also recommend reading Herodotus or at least the chapters dealing with this battle for some of the more interesting pieces of relative truth that did find there way into the graphic novel and thus the film. For instance, the Persian delegation being pushed into the Spartan well.
  • (5/5)
    Having seen the movie first, I still thoroughly enjoyed this book. Very striking and bold art accompanied by Miller's typical hard-boiled aplomb, the movie was a quite direct translation of this story. Perhaps there's a little bit more levity in the dialog, but otherwise the two are nearly identical. King Leonidas is definitely one of literature's and history's biggest badasses.