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Blau ist eine warme Farbe: Das preisgekrönte Werk um ein Coming-Out

Blau ist eine warme Farbe: Das preisgekrönte Werk um ein Coming-Out

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Blau ist eine warme Farbe: Das preisgekrönte Werk um ein Coming-Out

Bewertungen:
3/5 (228 Bewertungen)
Länge:
157 Seiten
33 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Dec 9, 2013
ISBN:
9783868697964
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Das Leben von Clementine kippt an dem Tag, als sie Emma trifft, eine junge Frau mit blauen Haaren, die sie alle Facetten der Lust entdecken lässt und ihr ermöglicht, sich dem Blick der anderen zu stellen. Eine einfühlsame Erzählung voller Zärtlichkeit.

Die ebenso sanfte wie tragische und mit autobiografischen Elementen versehene Coming-Out Geschichte über die zwei jugendlichen Frauen Clementine und Emma, die miteinander eine Liebesbeziehung eingehen und deswegen den homophoben Attacken ihrer Umwelt ausgesetzt sind, erhielt auf den Filmfestspielen von Cannes 2013 als Verfilmung "Blue is the Warmest Colour" mit der Goldenen Palme die wohl wichtigste cinephile Auszeichnung der Filmbranche und wurde somit in der Geschichte des Festivals als erster Film, der auf einer Comicvorlage basiert, ausgezeichnet. Die in Angoulême lebende Schöpferin der Vorlage, Julie Maroh, wiederum erhielt für ihr Graphic Novel-Debüt bereits im Jahr 2011 den Prix du Public auf dem berühmten Festival der Stadt.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Dec 9, 2013
ISBN:
9783868697964
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


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Blau ist eine warme Farbe - Julie Maroh

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Was die anderen über Blau ist eine warme Farbe denken

3.1
228 Bewertungen / 12 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    I fell in love with a girl for the first time at the age of fifteen, but I remember being attracted to girls far earlier than that. I went to school in a liberal neighborhood where a teacher might let slip a homophobic comment every now and then, but there were many openly gay and bisexual students. Everyone in my life knew that I liked girls, my mother gave me the “it’s okay if you’re gay” talk, and although I didn’t pursue relationships with women until later in life, I never felt like my feelings were shameful or wrong.

    Not everyone is so lucky, however, and Blue is the Warmest Color is the story of a young girl named Clementine who finds her feelings at war with the judgments of her parents and her peers. She doesn’t understand why she fears intimacy with her boyfriend or what it means that she keeps dreaming about the beautiful blue-haired girl she locked eyes with in the park the other day.

    Alternating between present and past, Blue is devastating, funny, and at times achingly vulnerable. We are first introduced to the full-color world of Emma, Clementine’s partner, who accompanies us through the pages of Clementine’s adolescent diaries to discover an innocent inner life where everything is black and white until love walks by.

    Blue’s message, that “only love will save the world,” is stunning and necessary. My one complaint about the novel is that the end comes so quickly. I would have liked to linger in Emma and Clementine’s world a little longer.
  • (4/5)
    This is my first serious try to get into reading graphic novels. And was it a moving start.

    In the beginning I struggled with this new medium, especially the drawing style. I didn't like the messy drawing, but those done more realistically were beautiful. However, the story itself is a moving, realistic take on teenage life, the struggle of finding yourself, especially when you try to cope with having a norm-breaking identity wich isn't fully accepted in the society.

    Though I couldn't understand how Clem could be so obsessed by Emma from just having seen her once in the street, their relationship moved in a realistic, honest way. While there were interest from the beginning, they struggled with their emotions and love, and the relationship had its struggles, downs and lows.

    It's a nice story of love, acceptance, living life and to be who you are, because there's always someone out there loving and accepting you.
  • (4/5)
    Touching graphic novel of a teenager's growing pains and gradual recognition and ultimately acceptance of her sexual identity. It touches on friendship, young love, peer pressure, family and acceptance.
  • (4/5)
    The art and the story are easily 4.5 Stars. But, I had to really concentrate to read the handwriting, especially the cursive writing. It was just too tiny. It's a shame as it detracted from the overall experience of the book.
  • (2/5)
    Liebe Auf Den Ersten Blick, Emmas abusive Noch-Freundin (natürlich die einzige Butch, um kein Klischee auszulassen), also alles hinter deren Rücken, "du bist keine Lesbe, ich spür das" (wtf srsly), es passiert immer das schlimmmstmögliche bei der ersten Gelegenheit, aber yay, sie sind zusammen… dann hat Clementine wirklich was mit einem Typen, was einfach mal wieder das selbe alte "Bis gehen immer fremd, und zwar definitiv mit Typen"-Trope ist (loool) (damit wird auch nur Emmas Zuschreibung nachgegeben, Clementine selbst bezeichnet sich mehrmals als lesbisch), und am Ende ist ein Queerchen tot und alles ist noch trauriger als zuvor. (Immerhin ist es nicht Suizid, was zwar realistisch wäre, aber halt auch so ein kleines bisschen überstrapaziert, kaum jemals gut umgesetzt und außerdem traurig af ist.)

    Nicht so meins. (Ehrlich, "Liebesgeschichte" und "am Ende stirbt eine der queeren Personen" hätte mir das schon verraten können, aber ich wollte es ja unbedingt lesen.) Aber, ich mag die Zeichnungen, besonders in dem Teil, in dem immer ein Dingsi blau ist ^-^
  • (5/5)
    I am new to graphic novels, the first one I read Fun House I found undesirable, but I am not one to give up very easy, so I checked this one out from the library and guess what? It is phenomenal between the depth of the story and striking graphics I am in awe. For those of you that are unfamiliar with graphic novels they are nothing like comic books with graphic novels the story is more complex and finished in one book unlike comic books that are short parts of a story that come out in issues over time. A very interesting fact about graphic novels is that they pre-date comic books the first graphic novel was published in 1783 while the first comic book in 1837.

    The prose of this read contains numerous tones such as personal growth, life and death, love, betrayal, forgiveness, and so much more creating a phenomenal tale of two individuals. Therefore, stunning me further such a sophisticated novel can be written in dialogue balloons and captions. The story felt too short yet the quality of writing it contains made up for it bizarre as it is wanting the story not to end is the only bad thing I could come up with about Blue is the Warmest Color.

    Next is the graphics which are mind-blowing. They are startlingly lifelike looking comparable to actual photographs the graphics are so detailed from the facial expressions to the little things such as a piece of trash on the ground or the door hinges. There are a lot of areas in this novel that the graphics, for example, the facial expressions communicate so well on their own the author did not even place words as well with the color blue.

    Then put together both the prose and graphics and you have something astonishing. Sensational graphics that will show you what is happening takes storytelling to a whole new level. Some readers might argue that it takes away from using your own imagination to picture what is going on, but I say no everyone will look at the graphics in a different way. Also, each time you look at the graphics you pick up something new you missed the first time. It also is just not a book for lesbians either, it is for everyone. You can learn a lot from this book. I was reminded to live every day to it's fullest and holding grudges gets you nowhere.
  • (4/5)
    The ending made me tear up a little, but it's a good story. And the art is wonderful and expressive. All in all a really moving experience.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not even going to lie this book is a little out of my comfort zone but I did enjoy it. I really love that book battle gets me to read books/comics that I never would have picked up otherwise. Sad story and I wish the ending had been a little better but I did like how it covered a longer time period giving the reader a full perspective of her life.
  • (2/5)
    Honestly, I really thought I would like this more - and maybe I'll have to pick up the French copy.

    The art is good, but never really astounding; the closest it comes is in the background and landscapes, when it approaches stunning, but unfortunately, there are very few. Most are focused in the city, which don't have very many scenic shots, or focus on the people.

    The conceit, of course, is in the color tone, with memories painted in sepia and shocks of blue, and the present a mixture of both. While this works to some extent, it was fairly obvious and occasionally added some brilliance that was much needed, but not much.

    As for the story, it was moving and realistic for the most part, but the pace felt rushed at the end - the build-up was phenomenal, with Clementine, a young high school girl, exploring her sexuality and new-found love for an older art student named Emma. There's a definite eroticism, though I agree with the author that the movie sadly played this for titillation rather than gentle exploration and love.

    Mostly however... it felt meh. I have a feeling part of this was due to the translation, which had some moments of transcendence, but occasionally felt very awkward. As I said, I'll have to pick up the original French to really judge.
  • (4/5)
    A beautiful, moving, bittersweet love story.
  • (4/5)
    The first time I started this book I was somehow disappointed, i put it down. When i picked it up again i started over and couldn't put it down.
  • (5/5)
    Stunning. Absolutely, positively beautiful.

    My attention was drawn to this graphic novel by one of the podcasts that I listen to. They raved about how gorgeous and important this story was. Of course, that meant I had to know what all the hype was about. Luckily my library had a digital copy of this for loan, and I snatched it up. I am so glad that I did. Blue Is the Warmest Color deserves all the accolades it has garnered, and more. Much more.

    Julie Maroh expertly crafts a story about a teenage girl named Clementine. We follow her through a series of drab, grayscale panels to begin with. I thought this was utterly brilliant on Maroh's part. See, Clementine's life lacks color. She moves through each day, without any passion for anything in particular. That is, until she sees the girl with blue hair, and blue eyes.

    Clementine's initial reaction to Emma, the girl with blue hair, undid me. The art in this book is perfection, but it's never more perfect than when Maroh is crafting the facial expression of one of the characters. Clementine's face when she sees Emma for the first time says it all. Attraction, jealousy, and above all else complete confusion as to why she'd even feel that way in the first place. I can't imagine what it's like to realize that you're attracted to the same sex, and based on the panels that follow Clementine's first glimpse of Emma, neither can she.

    What builds from there is one of the most heartbreaking and wonderful stories I've ever read. There's this mid-point where, once these two are together, everything starts to show in color. It was such a subtle change that I almost didn't catch it, but that's also why it's so fitting. Clementine's world fills with passion, and Emma is the center of that. Which, of course, makes the ending all the more devastating. Trust me, you'll need tissues for this.

    I feel it necessary to warn any potential readers that there are panels in this book that might bother some. There is nudity, and love making between two women. If you have an issue with those things, this probably isn't for you. If you don't, prepare to be enchanted. I can't express enough how much I agree that this is not only a lovely, but very important book. Blue Is the Warmest Color shows that love crosses all boundaries, no matter how solid we might think they are.