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Wanted - Comic zum Film

Wanted - Comic zum Film

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Wanted - Comic zum Film

Bewertungen:
3/5 (229 Bewertungen)
Länge:
192 Seiten
1 Stunde
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
May 24, 2016
ISBN:
9783736721326
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die Neuausgabe des Klassikers mit umfangreichem Bonusmaterial! Du hast einen miesen Job, deine Freundin betrügt dich und auch sonst läuft alles schief. Dann entdeckst du, dass du der Sohn eines Super-Killers mit übermenschlichen Kräften bist und dessen Fähigkeiten geerbt hast. Scheiße, was? Von wegen! Saucool. "Der Watchmen der Superverbrecher." Sunday Times.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
May 24, 2016
ISBN:
9783736721326
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


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Wanted - Comic zum Film - Mark Millar

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Wanted - Comic zum Film denken

3.0
229 Bewertungen / 18 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    If not for the ending this would have had a higher rating. It's really good until the ending ruins it.
  • (4/5)
    Why did the movie have to ruin this for everyone? This needs to be told AS IS. Yes, it's all F%$#*d up.It's like a long nasty ride on an elevated train. It may smell like a urinal but, if you take that train, you get there. And what a story you have after.
  • (1/5)
    Millar wrote his crude, violent anti-hero romp twenty years too late. While grittiness is still prized in 'grown up' comics, Millar has apparently mistaken 'mature content' for 'maturity'. Of course, he's not the first to fall into this trap. We've all seen television, movies, and books that place a premium on sex and blood, but presented with all the sophistication of a sniggering teen.Millar does not have the wit to present these issues seriously, nor are his plotting or characterization strong enough to save this book. Millar decided to base his assassin anti-hero on rapper Eminem, which is a cute enough idea, but it also gives us a good sense of Millar's sophistication. While many enjoy Eminem for his catchy, highly-produced songs and natural affinity for scansion and rhythm, only frat boys and OG wannabes find him an able role model.Millar seems to take the rapper's message of misanthropic misogyny at face value, instead of laughing at Eminem's battle-rap fronting. This is even more inexplicable because Eminem himself often makes light of the 'hard' persona inherited from gangster rappers. It's not hard to imagine Millar putting on a mix of Marshall's most lewd, angry odes to wife killing each time he sat down to plot out this series.Unfortunately, Millar is not the master of language that Eminem is, and so his attempts at humor, gangsta badassery, chauvinism, and romance tend to fall quite flat. His 'jokes' are especially cringe-worthy.Perhaps if Millar had come out with his ode to unsympathetic violence in the mid eighties, when Alan Moore, Frank Miller, and Scarface were still fresh, he might not have come off as so out of touch. Perhaps if he had somehow updated his vision to include some sympathy and humanity, he could have been forgiven. Unfortunately, he was too busy placing lit cigars and whiskey shots before his shrine to Snake Pliskin to think about what he was writing.However, all of this pales in comparison to Millar's twist ending. It's clear that Millar wishes he was Alan Moore, who inspired Millar to become a writer in the first place. Unfortunately, Millar realizes he is no Alan Moore, so now he's leapt onto Frank Miller's coattails instead. After 'Sin City', '300', and 'The Spirit', what comic creator is bigger than Frank Miller? Well, still Alan Moore.Perhaps Mark Millar was tired of people mistaking him for Frank and asking "oh, so you're that guy famous for the violent, sexist comics" and so figured after writing Wanted, he could respond "why yes, I am a famous misogynist comic author named Millar" and then count on the resulting confusion to help his comic sales and autograph lines at Comic Con.In any case, he threw most of that accidental good press out of the window when he decided that maybe he should try to be Grant Morrison, too. Millar completes his Magnum Opus by breaking the fourth wall for the sole purpose of insulting his fans for having shitty jobs, no luck with women, and for needing to buy comic books to pretend that their lives have meaning. While a bold move, I'm not sure that confronting his escapist readers with the sad reality of comic book fandom is the best way to make them, say, buy more comics.So, Millar comes frat boy full circle. Trying to be 'hard'? Check. Rampant Misogyny? Check. Idolizing Eminem? Check. Trying to bolster your self esteem by telling dorks that they will never have the sort of money and women you have? Check.Maybe Millar wants to start a rap career, but feels he won't be taken seriously if his main fanbase can't decide whether to spend their money on his CD's or on hand-painted, individually numbered acrylic statuettes of Vampirella making out with Dawn (the one with the reversed logo sent only to the Belgian market).In any case, he ought to have lost some fans here, both amongst the discerning and the escapists.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't really care for the art, and at times it felt too derivative (was it really necessary for the characters to be obvious fill-ins for actual comic book villains?). Even so, this is a fun read that succeeds in its mission to thrust Fight Club into the superhero universe. The story moves at a good pace without taking itself too seriously, and it pulls off some clever ideas with panache.
  • (4/5)
    3.5 really, but 4 because of the awesome artwork. Brilliant idea, but average execution.
  • (4/5)
    An irreverent over the top look at comic book super heroes.immature to the extreme, but original and at times funny.
  • (2/5)
    I think this is one of the very rare times where I liked the movie much more than I liked the book! And because I saw the movie first, I was very disappointed with this story. It is much too "sci-fi" with supervillains and alternate Earths and realities for my taste. In this, the supervillains have eliminated the superheroes, but they still have to worry about heroes from other dimensions or timelines, and, well... bleh. The only piece I really liked was the description of the character "Shit-Head" - "he" is, "The collected feces of the 666 most evil beings ever to walk the earth..." and "There's a little Hitler in there, a touch of Ed Gein, half a pound of Jeffrey Dahmer." Other than that, meh.
  • (1/5)
    My opinion of Millar's writing has not improved.
  • (5/5)
    Wanted, as well as being a flip of the traditional superhero origin story (telling the origin of the newest supervillain instead), is also a nice commentary on the dark and gritty comics that have grown more and more in popularity since 1985. The whole thing, to use the parlance of the book, is kind of a big "f-u" to the comics industry, from reader to creator. "Because, who reads comics anymore?"The world of Wanted is one where the supervillains have won. In fact, they won in 1986 and removed any knowledge of the defeated heroes from reality, leaving the world a grim and gritty place indeed, the one outside your window. In this world we are introduced to Wesley Gibson, perennial wuss with a life nobody wants, but most suffer through. Until he's told that he's the son and inheritor of one of the baddest supervillains to ever walk the Earth, recently deceased.We see Wesley go from simpering pacifist to stone-cold killer as he takes over his pop's career and learns the ropes in this new world of the Fraternity, the supervillain secret society that has been running the world ever since they defeated the heroes. Of course, like most giant criminal syndicates, there's dissent in the ranks, and Wesley's right in the middle.This particular edition is packed with goodies as well. Along with the Dossier that was part of the series run with artwork from some top comic names, there are also interviews and commentaries on the making-of, as well as a look at some alternate panels that were replaced and a cover gallery.Definitely an enjoyable read because, as I said, it not only presents a grim and gritty look at the comic world, but it also pokes fun at the reasons grim and gritty comic worlds came into being. Also, the final commentary from Wesley is a little thought-provoking, with a final image that will certainly shock and stick with the reader long after they put this one on the shelf.
  • (1/5)
    A power-fantasy for 20 somethings? The life of the over-accomodating "Wesley" is turned around when he discovers he has the ability to never miss any shot he takes no matter what. The story debases itself with senseless violence and ultimately degrades into a standard comic book story with a bit more violence and the likenesses of a few holywood actors. DC's "Villains United" is far more interesting.
  • (3/5)
    Wesley Gibbs is one of life's loosers. Suffering from mulitple stress disorders, he has an abusive boss, a slutty girlfriend, and no way out. That is until he discovers that his father, absent since Wesley's birth, was actually a supervillian who has left Wes $50 million. The catch is, that Wesley must take up The Killer's identity, and live as a supervillian for 6 months. As Wesley agrees to the plan he is quickly stripped of empathy and learns to act without remorse or consequences. He also learns that the supervillians joined together more than 20 years ago to defeat the heroes of the world, then "re-wrote" reality to make the world forget their existence -- except for comic books, which no-one reads. Supervillians now keep to the shadows, quietly running the world, and splitting the loot. However, some villians are not content with the background, and stage a coup to reenter the limelight once more. This book is why the term "mature readers" was invented. It is graphic in every sense of the word. Rape, murder, torture, a character made entirely of excrement -- it's all here. This book is a challenging read. While I think I get what Millar was going for here, I'm not sure if it was entirely accomplished. In a world without heroes, there is no one to cheer for -- and exporing that world is an interesting, if uncomfortable, prospect. However, the never ending parade of atrocities on display here gets old quick, and since Wesley quickly looses any humanizing or likeable qualities, it's difficult to care what happens to him. This is true of all the characters and is the centrla problem with this title -- if your choice is between bad and even worse, who cares? Jones does an excellent job of illustrating this world, you can feel the dinginess of the "re-written" universe and the character designs are excellent.
  • (2/5)
    People say that, when it comes to this book, you fall into one of two categories: you either think it's brilliant and edgy, or you can't appreciate the dark, satirical humor and thus hate it. I announce a third category. I didn't like this book. Not because the dark content offended me. Puh-lease. I've read worse and giggled as I did. My problem with "Wanted" is how underwhelming I found the whole thing. Elementary plot... flat characters... not-so-clever social commentary... I was bored. Yeah, it's neat that a story focuses on the villains rather than the heroes -- but isn't that what every tired gangster flick does? There was nothing compelling here, nothing which made me want more of the story after turning the last page. A good story should continue on in readers' minds long after the author has put down his pen. Unfortunately, "Wanted" was easy to put away.
  • (3/5)
    Funny twist to the superhero story, making it a super*villain* story. It doesn't make much sense... if you stop to think about it but things happen so fast that you don't have time to wonder and it gets away with it.
  • (5/5)
    I found this to be an unrealistic and easy, if dark and violence, graphic novel. That's not to say I didn't like it -- because I did. I just happened to have the luxury of seeing the movie version first. Luckily for everyone involved, the movie version is unlike the graphic novel in all but name and characters (and even then it's not quite that similar). The plots are sort of vaguely similar at the beginning and parts of the ending, but otherwise, the graphic novel takes a much darker twist. Which is good, because if this had been the movie? I would have hated it. That being said, I quite liked the book. It's a dark tale, following the life of our anti-hero (or hero, depending on how you want to look at it), Wesley Gibson. The story is high on violence, the art is beautiful (if occasionally kind of gross) and while the writing isn't as eloquent as, say, something Neil Gaiman wrote, it doesn't matter. It was a highly enjoyable graphic novel, but not for people who are expecting it to be exactly like the movie.
  • (3/5)
    Wanted is definitely not for everyone. There's a ton of violence (murder, rape, and more murder), and all of the characters are amoral. But, really, what do you expect in a story about super villains?The story line was definitely different. It was both interesting and repulsive, but apparently the interesting side won because I finished this. And I will likely always remember it, too.The character of Wesley...well, I couldn't stop thinking that he looked like Eminem, which was rather amusing. Other than that, it was hard to feel much of anything for him except revulsion. The same goes for the other characters (except Doll-Master, whom I liked).
  • (4/5)
    Catching up with ghosts of Millar's past. This was a romp and I can kinda see why it seemed shocking at the time, although I think Brian K. Vaughan's intro to this volume oversells the impact of the final two pages.

    Set in a completely different world to the film, this is set up as an antidote to mainstream superhero crossover stories rather than a standalone antihero story. I liked the film, but this is a superior work more akin to Shyamalan's stealth superhero universe than the knockabout fight-fest movie it became.

    Still, there are enough disgusting, comic book moments in it to satisfy fans of the film also.
  • (2/5)
    This book was given to me by someone who was a big fan of it for whatever reason, and now I'm constantly trying to dodge questions from him about what I thought. I tried to like it, I really did. However, I found that I just did not enjoy reading this very much. The artwork was very nice (though the main character looks just like Eminem), but Millar's writing is simply lacking. There's not enough character development or story development to really justify the violence and crudeness that runs rampant: it's just violence for its own sake. This wouldn't inherently be a problem, except that Mr. Millar executes it so poorly. It feels more like the passive release of his repressed adolescent aggression than a coherent narrative. I'm not a fan. All the points it gets come from the artwork and definitely not from the writing.
  • (4/5)
    I have to confess that I watched the movie before reading this book, as I am not normally a 'graphic novel' type of person. But this book was enjoyable, in a dark, violent way that was more satisfying than the film. The book avoided the quasi-spiritual claptrap of the 'Loom of Fate' that made the film into such a bore. A good quick read for when you're in the mood for something primal and dark. Don't expect heroes here.