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Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Staffel 8, Band 3: Wölfe!

Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Staffel 8, Band 3: Wölfe!

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Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Staffel 8, Band 3: Wölfe!

Bewertungen:
3/5 (351 Bewertungen)
Länge:
129 Seiten
30 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
15. März 2014
ISBN:
9783957830388
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Angriff der Wer-Vampire!

Vampire, die sich nach Belieben in Wölfe, Panther, Insekten oder Nebel verwandeln können, fallen im Norden Schottlands ein. Und als wäre das noch nicht genug, stehlen sie auch noch Buffys Sense, das Symbol für die Macht aller Jägerinnen weltweit. Die Jagd nach den neuen Feinden führt Buffy und ihre Truppe ins ferne Tokio, während Xander in Transsylvanien den verzweifelten Versuch startet, die Hilfe Draculas zu gewinnen.

Joss Whedons 8. Staffel exklusiv als Comic! Der Comic-Bestseller von Panini!
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
15. März 2014
ISBN:
9783957830388
Format:
Buch

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Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Staffel 8, Band 3 - Joss Whedon

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3.1
351 Bewertungen / 25 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    A group of Japanese vampires steal the scythe that was used by Willow to turn all the potentials into slayers. Buffy and the gang, with the help of Dracula, travel to Japan to bring back the enchanted weapon and keep the vampires from reversing the spell.This installment felt more like the television series than the two previous books. There was more of the mixture of humor and pathos that made the show so great. Xander really stands out in this story arch with his relationship with Dracula and Renee. Andrew shows up for some very funny nerdy scenes. I don't know what to think of Buffy and Satsu's storyline. It's kind of confusing and I don't know where the writers are going with it.
  • (3/5)
    I don't believe I liked this volume as well as I have liked the previous two. Among things I really did like were the Tokyo setting and the pulling in of Dracula. It was nifty to see him again, nifty to see him fighting with the Slayer, which seems like a contradiction and yet, it definitely worked. Buffy Vs Dracula was one of those episodes that felt somewhat extraneous although amusing, so it was nice to have Dracula here be less extraneous, although still equally amusing. I suppose my main complaint was Buffy & Satsu's relationship, which mostly just felt gratuitous to me. I'm uncertain what plot point it served, or what character point it served for Buffy. The most interesting part to me was the end, where you see this almost mirror image of the end of season three, only with Buffy in Angel's shoes and Satsu's in Buffy's. And I kind of feel like there are a few things I was missing here, but I'm going to blame that on the fact that I haven't read Volume 2 for quite some time, and thus forgot a few details.
  • (5/5)
    Um, *wow*. Love, love, love these - I so wish this was on TV!They're back, more crazy stuff happens, sad, weird...unexpected...and, with Dracula's help, ridiculously funny at times. A fantastic addition.
  • (4/5)
    The series, Whedon's "8th season" of Buffy the Vampire Slayer in comic book form, continues to be fun, rivetting and all around excellent. I'd love to have been able to watch this season in place of one of the later seasons of Buffy, because the Whedon touch is evident throughout.Volume 3 is alternately fun and emotionally intense, if a bit over the top at times. The characters we know are spot on (although I wish the ever-annoying Andrew could be given a bit more of a life beyond caricature) and all of them have interesting parts to play in the storyline, and the ones we're meeting for the first time are becoming interesting.
  • (4/5)
    As with the other volumes the artwork is breathtaking. I could visualize this story line on the small screen. The Whedonesque humor was plentiful and satisfying. There is one big problem though, and so as not to let a spoiler loose, I will just say that a personal decision that Buffy makes in this volume simply does not ring true at all; it feels like they dropped random ideas on the floor and picked this one up.
  • (4/5)
    In the third volume of Season Eight, Buffy comes up against a group of Japanese vampires who can shapeshift and turn into fog.This series just keeps getting better and better! Joss Whedon and Brian K. Vaughan gave us some fantastic drama in the first two story arcs; now Goddard kicks it up a notch with that other staple of the Buffyverse: humor. This was bloody hilarious. I don't often laugh aloud while I read, but portions of this book had me in stitches. I had a blast with it. So many pithy little comments! So much sarcasm! Both Whedon, (who penned the first issue of this arc), and Goddard know just how to use the medium to amplify their desired effect. The beats are spot on, the paneling drives the story forward and the dialogue is broken up just perfectly. It's a thing of beauty.But of course, Goddard also gives us some heartwrenching stuff. There's so much of it, in fact, that I feel a bit awkward emphasizing the humor in this volume. When all is said and done, though, I'm gonna remember WOLVES AT THE GATE as one of those rare and wonderful Buffyverse episodes that had me in stitches.I also remain very impressed with Jeanty's art. He's done some great stuff here; one of my favourite panels involves Buffy doing a mid-air leap onto the bad guy's back. All the characters are recognizable, too; always a good thing.If you're a Buffy fan, I can't recommend Season Eight highly enough. You've gotta read it. Start with THE LONG WAY HOME, (effectively the season premier), move along to NO FUTURE FOR YOU, (a fantastic Faith-centric arc), then plunge into WOLVES AT THE GATE. I doubt you'll be disappointed.(An updated version of this review is available on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • (5/5)
    Whoa. Good comic. :)
  • (4/5)
    Read on December 25, 2016Both entertaining (Dracula and Xander are bros?!) and utterly heartbreaking (poor Xander can't catch a break). The Buffy/Satsu connection seems completely random and totally fitting. Overall, great story arc.
  • (3/5)
    Comedy and Tragedy, blended with some kink they never could have done on TV.
  • (4/5)
    A new breed of vampires have appeared and have stolen the sythe that Buffy used to turn all the potentials into Slayers. These vampires can turn into mist and animals so the gang go off to enlist the help of Dracula, the only other vampire with these powers. We delve into Xander's relationship with Dracula, his Master, and the possibility of him loving again. The new vampires have a plan to turn the Slayers back into regular girls unless the gang can stop them.
  • (4/5)
    I started out skeptical. Elements of the previous comics seemed unlike the Buffy we knew and loved...and while l still saw some of that in the beginning of this volume, by the end of it, it really started feeling like classic Buffy again, and I was really glad to see that. It definitely still captures the characters well, but the plot contained too much senseless fighting, with not enough actual, well, plot, lacking intrigue. I feel like Willow, who, yes, I'm biased towards, since she's my favorite character, is not featured nearly enough, although I did enjoy how she was bonding with Satsu over Buffy. I'm...typically depressed by Whedon's tendency to not ever allow a couple to be happy. My one uber-random complaint? Why does Dracula look like a demented combination of Johnny Depp's Willy Wonka and Michael Jackson?
  • (4/5)
    Wolves at the Gate is another excellent collection of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season 8. This graphic novel includes writing by Joss Whedon, which means the humor is out in full force. There's not much progress in this collection, other than killing of more vampires and new demons threats removed. However, the continued character development is what drives the Buffy series, and there are more unexpected twists and turns in the life of Buffy and her friends. Book 3 is a great book for fans of Buffy humor. The art work could use more detail, but other than that, the words and pictures go together well to create an enjoyable story.
  • (5/5)
    A gang of Japanese vampires, using powers won from Dracula in a crooked card game, steal Buffy's magic battle axe to forge a magic spell to turn all the slayers human again. That was the ordinary stuff. The extraordinary stuff is personal; Buffy's being on the receiving end of a heavy lesbian love from Satsu, one of her lieutenants, Xander's crush on Renee, another slayer in the midst, and the return of Dracula and his oft-hilarious relationship with former manservant Xander. Speaking of hilarious, the morning after stuff following Satsu and Buffy's night of passion is of epic hilarity. A particularly well-done story, ending with a fine mix of tragedy and comforting warmth.
  • (5/5)
    Buffy's latest foe is a group of Japanese vampires with the powers of Dracula: the ability to turn into wolves, panthers, bees and fog. They're also planning something that will devastate the slayer army. Plus, Buffy figures out who is so in love with her that they were able to wake her from the spell cast on her in the last book. Again the plotting and dialogue was very true to the spirit of the TV series. The artistic work was somewhat between the first and the second in quality and my personal ability to figure out who the characters were supposed to be. (I had some trouble with Andrew, but the dialogue helped me figure it out.) One more thing, poor Xander! Can this guy not catch a break in the romantic realm?
  • (5/5)
    Okay, the Dracula episode of the teevee series is one that I only half-watched, if that, so I don't get most of the Dracula/Xander interaction, and I'm kinda pissed that the cute relationship between Xander and Renee had to end in her death. I realize it made sense within the story but still, BOO.

    (four-and-a-half stars)
  • (4/5)
    This volume was so entirely Joss Whedon to a T. He still hates happiness. And Buffy still likes leading folks on, thus the song for today. Anyone surprised? But seriously, why does Joss believe that happy couples should never be allowed to actually remain happy? Either someone has to become a jackass and not marry that person, or sex turns someone evil, or one of the two has to die. There are no other options in the Whedon-verse. Sigh. So if you're coming to a Whedon show for the sweet romances, well, don't.

    What you should come here for is the relationship between Dracula and Xander. I am so shipping their friendship right now; just to be clear, I do not want them to be more than friends. They have such a humorous dynamic. It would be just like Xander to become besties with the most famous vampire of all time, who totally gets dressed up to see Xander. Oh the adorable and the jokes.

    The big showdown at the end was definitely a forum only to cause movements of characters for later segments and for Joss to hate happiness. Other than that, it wasn't really that huge of a fight. I think this was the best volume in season 8 so far, though.
  • (5/5)
    Drew Goddard is no stranger to the Buffyverse, and he's back to bring some classic Buffy madcap fun to the series. Of course, being a part of the Whedon crew, Goddard also brings the seriousness, normally hand-in-hand with the zany.That's what makes it so good.Tokyo, Dracula, new love, Mecha-Dawn... it's all here!
  • (4/5)
    It's got the grand scale to take advantage of a comic book's strengths, without too much story to fit into a comic book's short length. And it has a pretty good sense of humor. And one exceptionally affectingly done sad scene.
  • (5/5)
    *Book source ~ LibraryWhen some Japanese vampires attack the slayer stronghold in Scotland using some funky tricks that vamps aren’t supposed to be able to do and steal Buffy’s scythe, she sends Xander to go pump Dracula for information. Since Drac is the only other vampire they know who can transform into animals and fog they’re hoping that not only can he help, but that he will. Ok, first off, the illustrations don’t seem to be very consistent. Sometimes the characters are recognizable and sometimes they aren’t. Not sure what’s up with that. Other than that irritating factor I do love the artwork. As for the plot, who doesn’t love when Dracula gets worked into the story? But Xander spending time with him after Anya’s death? Seriously? A bit farfetched if you ask me, but I’ll work with it if it means they have an in with Dracula. The story is tight and focused mostly on these Japanese vamps. There is a side story about Buffy and Satsu that I find nigh impossible to believe considering everything I’ve seen about Buffy in the past, so I call foul on that. And finally, Buffy has a short meeting with Twilight and he kicks her ass, but lets her live. Hmmmm…anyway, all things considered this is my favorite story so far in Season 8. I hope to see more of Dracula in the future. He’s a bit of an asshat, but not so bad I wouldn’t enjoy seeing him again. And again. Just sayin’.
  • (5/5)
    Just fantastic. Love the guest star in this one. Also really love that the sense of humor from the series carries over so well!
  • (4/5)
    Season 8 continues with Buffy's first meeting of the mysterious Twilight and a group of vampires from Japan trying to undo what Buffy started at the end of season 7.These issues/"episodes" should count among some of the more clever writing in all of BVS. Every few pages included SOMETHING which had me literally laughing aloud. "But you did more things!""I'm just gonna go sit in the corner and wait for Willow to arrive." *KRASH!*We get to see the one and only Dracula again, and learn a little more of what has been happening in the world of the Scoobies since the Hellmouth collapsed. I wish there had been more writing like this during the last two seasons of the show. Supposed you can get away with more when things are in print.
  • (4/5)
    What a great collection this is! The Slayers are up against some nasty vamps that managed to steal Dracula's secrets and are planning on returning all the girls to normal humans! The team heads to Japan to take them down with Dracula in tow and things get bloody really quickly (with a wonderful nod to Godzilla when Giant Dawn comes smashing the streets). Wonderful storytelling, and perfect dialogues between characters make this a truly enjoyable read!
  • (4/5)
    I didn't love everything about this volume, but one thing I loved surprisingly was Dracula. I say surprisingly, because I wouldn't name the "Buffy Versus Dracula" episode in Season Four as a favorite. But I thought the character was actually more interesting in this comic than he ever was on the show--and that's the first time I can say that in this series. And this volume had some genuinely funny moments. Buffy was always notable for its humor, even in--maybe especially in--the midst of its saddest moments.I was less than thrilled with the romantic elements. And here I be discussing some parts some might consider spoilers--mild spoilers, because I don't think they're gasp-worthy elements such as some in this series, but spoilers nevertheless, so avert your eyes from the rest of the review if that's an issue with you. *Spoilers*First, Renee. Renee who? Yeah, I had to look the name up again right after reading this. Xander's love. Brief love. Because naturally soon after their first kiss, she's toast. Well, first, God Xander--maybe you should go into the priesthood, because no one he goes out with ever survives long. But also, not feeling the love. In the television series, the death of Jenny and Tara mattered--we cared because they were built up to. But here? Seemed contrived and gratuitous.Then there's Buffy's lesbian interlude with Satsu. Ugh. Look, I loved Tara and was completely on board with Willow/Tara. But it's not just that this is out of the blue. It occurs to me that I can't recall even one male/male sexual relationship in all of Buffy and Angel--not counting the occasional joke or double entendre. Something about this particular relationship of Buffy's seems to me to be male fantasy rather than logical character development. And it points up a feeling I have with these comics I never got with the series.(On the other hand, the scenes where Buffy and Satsu were discovered in bed I did find really funny.)
  • (3/5)
    Much was great, but Buffy's angst is so very one-note. If I could give it 3. stars I would.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: This time around we get the single-issue story "A Beautiful Sunset" first, scripted by Joss Whedon himself, in which Buffy deals with the isolation of power, even as she gets her first face-to-face meeting with Twilight, this season's Big Bad. In the main four-part story arc, "Wolves at the Gate", the Scotland slayer HQ is attacked by a group of Japanese vampires who can turn into wolves, or fog. When they steal Buffy's scythe, she'll stop at nothing to get it back, although before they head to Tokyo, they'll have to enlist the help of the vampire whose powers are being used by the Japanese gang: Dracula himself.Review: In terms of plot development, this volume is pretty simple: Bad guys steal Buffy's scythe (which... ARGH! That. Is. Not. A. SCYTHE! It is an ax. AN AX!), Buffy & Co. track them down, kick their butts, and get the scythe back. In terms of character developments, however, this volume is incredible. Buffy and Xander do most of the heavy lifting, but Willow and others get plenty of nice character moments. There's some new emotional entanglements, Buffy's usual "it's lonely at the top" angsting, and this is the moment where the seriousness of this season's Big Bad really hits home for each of the characters.But, amidst all of the pathos and heartbreak, this volume is also literally laugh-out-loud funny. Not just a muted chuckle, either - I was roaring with laughter at some scenes (Not to give too much away, but they're in Tokyo... and Buffy's little sister isn't exactly so little anymore. Now take whatever you're imagining and multiply the funny by five.) The dialogue, the banter between characters, the snarky sarcasm and quick-cuts... everybody sounds like themselves, and they all sound like a Joss Whedon show. So, all-in-all, an excellent mix of uproariously funny, terribly sad, a few kick-ass fight scenes, a few more teasing hints about Twilight's identity and agenda, and an interesting if not particularly complex plot staring one stupid mis-named scythe. 4 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: Anyone who liked Buffy the TV show really, really needs to be reading this series. I loved No Future for You, and this installment is equally good, albeit in different ways.