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Batman: Was wurde aus dem Dunklen Ritter?

Batman: Was wurde aus dem Dunklen Ritter?

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Batman: Was wurde aus dem Dunklen Ritter?

Bewertungen:
3/5 (250 Bewertungen)
Länge:
129 Seiten
45 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709508
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Er ist Gotham Citys Beschützer, rächender Geist und Dunkler Ritter. Jahrelang hat er einen Einmann-Krieg geführt, um seine Straßen sicher zu machen. Doch heute Nacht hat dieser Krieg sein letztes und größtes Opfer gefordert: Batman selbst. Der maskierte Verbrecherjäger liegt in einem Sarg in der Crime Alley, dem Ort, an dem er geboren wurde. Seine engsten Freunde und tödlichsten Feinde versammeln sich, um ihm die letzte Ehre zu erweisen. Jeder von ihnen erzählt eine andere Geschichte über den Batman, den er kannte: Wie er lebte, und wie er starb. Wie ein Schatten in der Nacht wacht eine dunkle Gestalt über dieser makabren Gedenkfeier. Sie weiß, dass die widersprüchlichen Geschichten, die die Helden und Schurken erzählen, unmöglich alle wahr sein können. Bevor die Nacht vorbei ist, bevor sich Batmans Sarg für immer schließt, muss die Gestalt im Verborgenen Antwort auf die Frage finden: Was wurde aus dem Dunklen Ritter?
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709508
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of books for children and adults whose award-winning titles include Norse Mythology, American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), Coraline, and The Sandman graphic novels. Neil Gaiman is a Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR and Professor in the Arts at Bard College.


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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Batman denken

3.1
250 Bewertungen / 18 Rezensionen
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Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    I have to preface this by saying that this is the first Batman comic I’ve read and in retrospect, this wasn’t the best way to start since it is paying tribute to all the Batman writers and artists who went before it. The book is Batman looking down on his own funeral and seeing how his friends and enemies reflect back on his life, each offering their own interpretative perspective on the Batman. It’s an interesting concept, though sort of odd as no one’s story matches up with any one else’s story (I know, that’s sort of the point, but it’s still odd to read a book like that). This edition also has some other short story-style Batman comics by Gaiman. I particularly enjoyed “A Black and White World,” which is a goof in which the reader gets a behind-the-scenes look as the Joker and the Batman reflect on life as comic book stars (Joker: “I never get panels like that.” Batman: “So? You get to make speeches.”). In “Pavane” and “When is a Door,” we get to look closer at two of Batman’s old nemeses, Poison Ivy and the Riddler, respectively.
  • (4/5)
    DC Comics decided to do for Batman what they did several years ago with Superman. They had a two-part story written by a comics great (Alan Moore) that ended the series running at the time, then started the titles again from 0. (Making comic-shop employees everywhere groan.) For Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader, they tapped Neil Gaiman and artist Andy Kubert. Set at the funeral of the Batman, friends and foes take turns telling stories, as the reader tries to figure out what’s going on.Typical of Gaiman, the story focuses on the power and relative truth of stories. Included in the Deluxe hardcover edition are 3 other Gaiman Batman-related stories. Kubert channels past masters as the appearance of Batman and the style of the stories changes. It’s a nice edition of a good tribute to a great character but better perhaps for fans of Batman than for fans just of Gaiman because of the comics backstories that inform it.
  • (4/5)
    It's hard for me to write a review and rate this collection of comics. I'm not a huge fan of Batman, and I've gravitated more towards Marvel than DC. Nevertheless, when I saw this on my library's shelves, I had to check it out, simply because I've heard such great things about the story.The "Whatever Happened..." comic is presented as a mystery. Batman's apparently dead, and his friends and foes have joined together to "mourn" his passing, but different ends are attributed to him. Even Batman, who is an observer to this funeral, is confused. The ending, in my opinion, is less than satisfying. I imagine that Gaiman was trying to show that Batman means something different to everyone who was involved in his life. But, to me, it just came off as confusing.Andy Kubert's art for the story is amazing.And then there are the other stories included, since the "Whatever Happened..." comic itself is only two parts. These are okay, but none of them particularly stuck out as very interesting to me.
  • (2/5)
    Apparently this was the last of the originally numbered Batman/Detective Comics. The choice was to tell multiple death stories, and to use multiple styles mimicking those of earlier artists/eras. None of it really worked for me, I’m afraid, but Selina Kyle gets to kick things off, and I did like the opening sequence where all the big bads arrive for Batman’s funeral and the way they treat their cars is a summary of their characters. Two-Face’s car is particularly effective.
  • (2/5)
    "Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader" marks a temporary end to DC Comics' line of Batman comics. In it, esteemed author Neil Gaiman has been invited to concoct an ending for Batman, even if he is to be revived, rebooted is perhaps a more apt term, in the coming months. Gaiman cleverly uses this opportunity to tell the story of Batman's end but not demise.Gaiman deftly and cleverly weaves plot and subplot together to create an interesting artifact. Unfortunately, while it is intellectually stimulating, and lives up to its namesake of a detective comic, it never seemed quite that believable. A relatively short story, I didn't feel like Gaiman had the time or space to develop a proper Batman personality and as a result, I didn't care very much either way for his end.
  • (2/5)
    Didn't really care so much for this batman novel. It was a fun concept but, I thought it could have had a better story line. For some reason, I just don't see batman's enemies acting the way they did in this novel. This was a bit of a let down.
  • (3/5)
    A fine tribute to Batman and the mythos surrounding him, written with obvious love by Neil Gaiman. It didn't blow my hair back, but its a fine "conclusion" for the Batman story. At least until he inevitably reappears.
  • (5/5)
    A must-read book for fans of both Batman and of Neil Gaiman.We watch Batman's funeral through his own eyes. Speakers at the wake include Albert, Catwoman, Riddler, Joker, Penguin and more, as well as cleverly including one of gaimans characters from his legendary Sandman series. A great read also includes 3 other short batman stories penned by Gaiman including one previosly published in Batman: Black and White vol. 1.
  • (3/5)
    OK, I'm prepared for the gasps of shock and anger from the appropriate crowd, but honestly, I was really disappointed in this story. Maybe part of the problem is that I am just not that familiar with what is happening in the individual comic book series right now, but I do know that Bruce Wayne has apparently died. Gaiman was asked to write a swan song of sorts for Batman, and Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? is the end result.I'm not really sure what I was expecting, but I don't think this was it. Originally publihsed in Batman #685 and Detective Comics #852, basically, we are witnessing Batman's funeral (not Bruce Wayne's) and the remaining supporting cast of the series has come to pay their respects. Each person, including his Rogues Gallery, speaks about Batman and how he died, and how each person contributed to his death. Yet not one of these stories matches with another. And it appears that Bruce Wayne is viewing all of the ongoings as a sort of out of body experience.I think the biggest problem here is that Gaiman was only given two issues to write this out in. I definitely think that the story could have benefited from one, maybe two, more issues of story. It seemed, at least to me, that Gaiman had more story to tell but had to compress what he had to make it fit into the space allotted. He tried to pay tribute to each of the most influential artists and writers of the Batman mythos, but with so many tributes crammed into only two issues and still needing to leave room for the 'big reveal' explanation at the end, what we're left with is a rather jumbled mess of a story.Andy Kubert's art is quite stunning throughout. He makes an effort to replicate the basic art styles from each time frame that Gaiman pays tribute to, and does an admirable job. His unique style comes through the entire story, but you can also see the artistic influences of the time in his art. I found it a unique and fresh approach to the art. I just wish the story itself left me with the same feeling.Also included in this edition are four other Batman stories that Gaiman has written over the years.Maybe if I were more immersed in the Batman series right now, this story would have meant more to me. Maybe if I were a faithful monthly reader, I would have gotten more out of it. But I'm not a stranger to the Batman mythos, and this still felt like Gaiman couldn't quite decide where he wanted to take his story. Maybe he needed another issue. Who knows. I'm sure this story will appeal to the right person, whether that person is a Gaiman fan or a Batman fan. All I know is that I'm a little bit of both (more a Gaiman fan than a Batman fan) and I was left wanting something more out of this story.
  • (5/5)
    I had high expectations for this work by Neil Gaiman, and was not disappointed. The art is beautiful and a high tribute to previous artists. The storyline is intriguing and well thought-out. This is one of the best Batman collections I've read in some time.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting story about the death of Batman. Neil makes it much more complex and so more interesting. All his enemies are at the wake. Each has a story on how he or she killed batman. More dark psychology at work here. Alfred's story is the most telling and most interesting.
  • (4/5)
    Friends, enemies, and acquaintances gather to remember Batman at his funeral, as the Caped Crusader's spirit watches and wonders what's going on. No two stories are alike, but this is a way of reconciling the Batman stories and legends, and as each person steps up to tell about Batman's demise, the artwork and language take on new life. If you've been following Batman for ages, you'll recognize the storylines and inspirations for these stories.I thought this was a great "ending" to the Batman story, though if there's anything that this book goes out of its way to say, it's that the Batman legend doesn't end. However, the funeral seems a bit short - I mean, with this cast of characters, Gaiman could've gone on and on, but a few more stories wouldn't have hurt! The three stories included afterward are great, and I particularly enjoyed "A Black and White World," probably because I'm a fan of stories and TV shows that break the fourth wall.
  • (4/5)
    Merideth says: Hmmmm.... getting Neil Gaiman to write the "last" Batman story was a clever move on the part of DC, as Gaiman rarely writes comics anymore, so even without the "DEATH OF BATMAN" hype, this would have been an event. That being said, I'm not sure if this really works. To me, it carried too many overtones of Gaiman's other work on Sandman, which was a much more elegant, less rushedm goodbye to a character. Fans going into this cold, not being familiar with Morrison's work on Batman will likely be confused. Andy Kubert deserves credit for beautifully illustrating the volume, and the muted colors serve the story well.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent conclusion to the Batman canon. The bonus stories at the end were a little uneven--I liked one and the other two wee okay. But the focus is really on the conclusion of Batman's story, bringing in all the ways it could have happened over the years and mimicking the styles of the different eras, artists, and writers.

    This totally coherent, in-depth review brought to you by: seven-week-old infant first book read in over a month!
  • (4/5)
    The Caped Crusader's many incarnations are examined. A celebration of the Batman legend.
  • (5/5)
    I love Batman. I love his cape; I love his gloves; I love his quips (when he's written by someone who does quips); I love his camp (when he's written by someone who does camp). I love his stupid little sidekick and his stupid little butler. I love his villains. All of them. Very much. My wife gets jealous sometimes.So does Neal Gaiman.There really wasn't any way that I wasn't going to love this book. It's a tiny little story in the DC Universe's Everything-We've-Ever-Published-Is-True-it-Just-Takes-Place-In-A-Different-Version-of-Earth tradition. Gaimen weaves together a handful of short tales of Batman's life and death that couldn't really be put together in another format. Don't worry. Batman didn't actually die in the regular comics. These are just some of the ways that it could have happened. Also some musing about how superheroes are like legends, which are like stories. If you read good contemporary comics, you've heard this before.Good stuff. Read it. It'll only take you 20 minutes. You might get a bit choked up towards the middle.
  • (4/5)
    In the same vein as, but markedly different from, "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow", this collection of comics by Gaiman casts a scrying eye into aspects of the dark knights character that have rarely been explored before. In addition to the two-part title story, three one-shots are included, each of which is as original and entertaining as the main one.
  • (5/5)
    I was totally psyched to find out that Neil Gaiman wrote a Batman story. To find it was the last Batman story was even more interesting. This was amazing, not only did they find a way to end the Batman saga regardless of incarnation, they also managed to evoke previous incarnations of Batman throughout the illustrations. This also includes several other Batman stories by Gaiman which were interesting and entertaining in their own right. A must read for any Batman or Gaiman fan.