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Batman: Noël

Batman: Noël

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Batman: Noël

Bewertungen:
3/5 (76 Bewertungen)
Länge:
114 Seiten
27 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736710016
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

MEHR ALS EINE WEIHNACHTSGESCHICHTE Inspiriert von Charles Dickens' unsterblichem literarischen Klassiker Eine Weihnachtsgeschichte schickt Ausnahmekünstler Lee Bermejo (JOKER, LEX LUTHER: MANN AUS STAHL) den Dunklen Ritter in dieser spektakulären Graphic Novel nicht nur in den Kampf gegen Joker, sondern auch auf Konfrontationskurs mit den unruhigen Geistern der Vergangenheit, der Gegenwart und der Zukunft. So entstand in realistischen Bildern eine außergewöhnliche Bestandsaufnahme und stimmungsvolle Studie des seit über 70 Jahren währenden Batman-Mythos, mit Robin, Superman, Catwoman und vielen andern!
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736710016
Format:
Buch

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Batman - Lee Bermejo

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Was die anderen über Batman denken

3.2
76 Bewertungen / 11 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    The premise: ganked from BN.com: Inspired by Charles Dickens' immortal classic A Christmas Carol, BATMAN: NOEL features different interpretations of The Dark Knight, along with his enemies and allies, in different eras.Along the way, Batman must come to terms with his past, present and future as he battles villains from the campy 1960s to dark and brooding menaces of today, while exploring what it means to be the hero that he is. Members of Batman's supporting cast enact roles analogous to those from A Christmas Carol, with Robin, Catwoman, Superman, The Joker and more playing roles that will be familiar to anyone who knows Dickens' original holiday tale.My Rating: Good ReadThe story is good. The art is excellent. So rating this is a bit hard, but I am a Batman fangirl, so seeing Batman in more of a villainous light (despite the redeeming Christmas Carol theme) had me less excited for the story itself than I might've been otherwise. Don't get me wrong: the story is quite clever and very good, it's just that Batman's already redeemed in my mind, so I don't need a redemption story. Does that make sense? Still, if you're a fan of Bats, you definitely want to get your hands on this. There's also a cameo from a certain Kryptonian, which would normally bother me, but worked fantastically in this setting.Spoilers, yay or nay?: Uh, yay? I mean, let's face it, if you know how A Christmas Carol goes, this book will have no surprises. The joy is seeing how Dickens' tale is adapted to Batman's world, and it's rather interesting at that. So I won't spoil those specifics, but the general arc of A Christmas Carol story is pretty much fair game, so you've been warned. :) The full review is in my blog, and as always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)REVIEW: Lee Bermejo's BATMAN: NOELHappy Reading!
  • (5/5)
    OK, you want me to tell you a story?

    Batman: Noel is quite a graphic novel. It takes a tip from Charles Dickens and creates its own version of "A Christmas Carol," minus the ghosts. It is a commentary on the Dark Knight, a vigilante who tends to cross the line that others would fear to cross (Gordon said that).

    It's a narrative piece, where someone (we find out who at the end) is telling his kid a story, about Scrooge (Batman) and how he meets three people who make him take a look at his life and make some changes. As the novel says, some people need a wake-up call like getting hit with a baseball bat before they change!

    The hint of Christmas is muted in favor of a story of a guy (Bob) who is running some money for the Joker. The Batman jumps on Bob in his search for the Clown of Crime. The Bats has a run-in with Catwoman (who is nicely drawn) and Superman. The final confrontation with the Joker is meaningful and exciting in its storyline and art.

    Lee Bermejo draws some great panels. His use of shadow and light and conveying mood and mystery is really exciting. If I could nitpick, it's in the way he throws sweat and spit around. It's a good device to use, but it's over and over again to a point where the "spit" loses interest for me!

    Lee also wrote the story and the man really has a talent for the written word. Minimal, yet keeps it informal and interesting.

    Bottom Line: This is NOT an adaptation of Dickens' A Christmas Carol. It's a deep, dark and sometimes frightening look at a man who has crossed the line and has lost all hope in his quest to beat down the criminal element and "reduce the criminal surplus population!" It's a story that a man can change with some conviction and some tough love! Highly recommended.


  • (4/5)
    A Christmas Carol, Batman style, though Batman as Scrooge isn't what I expected. Of course, I also didn't think that I'd like the art, but I did.It's the Christmas Carol story told by an outsider (not Batman or any of his 'Bat Family') and the accompanying art very much mirrors the story, though it's not a perfect fit.It also seems to me to be poking fun at the fact that the Batman comics have over the years been getting serious-er and serious-er (or perhaps I'm reading too much into that part of it).My favorite part though was the art and coloring. Especially how Superman was drawn and colored, it was amazing.
  • (5/5)
    I have a slight obsession with Christmas. No, I’m not the kind that advocates that you keep Christ in Christmas or even the kind of guy who goes to church once a year on Christmas Eve. In fact, I’m not religious in the slightest. What I’m all about are the Christmas specials, the movies, the music, the food and spending time with friends and family. Every year it succeeds in making me feel like a kid again as well as bringing back the best memories of my life.

    For as long as I can remember, my favorite Christmas special was Mickey’s Christmas Carol. It took a classic Dickens tale and adapted it for those wacky anthropomorphized Disney animals. You had Uncle Scrooge as well.. Scrooge. Mickey was your Bob Cratchit and Goofy played Jacob Marley. There’s also a whole cast of characters that round out the special including a very menacing Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come that scared the crap out of a 5 year old Brandon.

    For a long time, it went uncontested as my favorite adaptation of A Christmas Carol. Hell, it didn't even really have competition. That is until I finished Lee Bermejo’s spin on the classic tale with Batman: Noel.

    Going into this book, I didn't really have a whole lot of knowledge surrounding the plot. I mean, I knew it was based on A Christmas Carol but I wasn't aware of who was going to play what role. Imagine my surprise when I found out that Batman would play the part of ol’ Ebenezer! I was relieved that it didn't feel gimmicky or spun in a certain way for the character to fit. Bermejo does such a fantastic job relating Bruce Wayne to Ebenezer Scrooge that I wondered how could be written any other way.

    The artwork is beautiful as well. Not only did Bermejo write the script but he also drew the damn thing. It’s not often that you've got someone doing both. You can really see the passion that he empties onto the page with numerous full page shots and inventive dialogue – a lot of which was lifted from Dickens story, with a slight spin of course.

    Overall, I thought this was an excellent book. It was a little on the short side but it’s also very tightly constructed. I may have to pick this up for myself and make it a yearly read around the holiday season.

    Cross Posted @ Every Read Thing
  • (4/5)
    A daringly bold, unique and, for the most part, successful take on Charles Dickens' classic "A Christmas Carol". The writing's great. Considering this is Bermejo's first venture into writing, I think he has done a good job for the most part. I feel that it suffers a little midway through the book; the narrative structure of the Dickensian classic and the natural flow of events surrounding the Batman in this story clashed at times and it therefore felt a bit disjointed here and there. This isn't an issue all throughout the book however. This is but a small quibble, for what I still think is a phenomenal piece and might soon be considered "essential" Batman reading. Bermejo's artwork in the book, just like his other art in "Joker" and "Luthor" is so lush and spellbindingly beautiful. It is a thing of beauty to look at...Bermejo, known for his stellar art, and now, with him writing this, has surely cemented himself as a force to reckon with in the comic world.
  • (4/5)
    Batman: Noel is Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol set with Batman as Scrooge, Robin as Marley, Catwoman as the Ghost of Christmas Past, Superman as the Ghost of Christmas Present, and the Joker as the Ghost of Christmas Future. It's an interesting premise, even if sometimes the molding of Gotham City's cast into the Dickensian world is a bit forced or clunky. The illustrations are amazing, with the dark colors and shading matching the mood of the book. It also serves to reinforce the idea of Batman having become a hardened vigilante instead of the kind of campy superhero of the 1960s TV show. Apparently, this is Lee Bermejo's first time as an author and not just an illustrator, and while this isn't a phenomenal book, it's well done (especially for a newbie author) and I'd be interested to see what else Bermejo produces.
  • (4/5)
    I'd put off reading this a while, despite a lot of good critical reviews. I wish I hadn't, as I enjoyed this a lot but there's a silver lining in my delay.

    Reading a Dickens' Christmas Carol pastiche via Batman in June with temps in the 90's didn't mute the effectiveness of the story and in some ways showed me how well done it was.



    Yes, Batman as Scrooge is a staging that seemed strange at first blush but it grew in its work and still told a good tale with a few strains of credulity in there (moreso than the usual)--Other than authorial conceit and Clark's role as the Ghost of Christmas Present, why doesn't Superman return to help Batman when the Batmobile blows up seconds after his departure?

    I'll be looking for more works by Lee Bermejo, and that's about the highest praise I give for contemporary creatives.
  • (4/5)
    I have never read or seen A Christmas Carol before so I only understand the basics of the story. I have no idea how close this book is to the original, but it has all the main points.At first I didn't like the art very much because it was too detailed, but I got used to it after a couple pages and it's actually not that bad. I loved how Superman was drawn. And speaking of Superman, I liked that he had a little appearance in this book. I also liked the boots that Batman and Superman were wearing. They were really cool and I have to wonder where they got them.The only thing I had a problem with was who was Scrooge. In the beginning it is implied that the Joker is Scrooge, but later in the story Batman becomes Scrooge. Maybe the author forgot or maybe he's saying that they both would fit Scrooge's character. Are they both Scrooge or was this just a mistake?
  • (3/5)
    An interesting story, layering Dickens over Batman, drawing parallels and interesting connections between the two stories.
  • (5/5)
    Now, this was a SPECTACULAR graphic novel!

    The real reason for my 5-star rating is the artwork, which is amazing. It is dynamic, and the contrasts between lights and shadows really give the story setting some real depth. All of the characters are inked and colored to not only highlight their personalities, but provides a sense of some historical background (especially the “Ghost of Christmas Past”). I really liked how the “Ghost of Christmas Present” had a glow about him, almost like a barely-there aura of latent power. Even the supporting characters have this sense of depth that comes from great detail in the artwork. Especially noteworthy is how Batman is characterized at different times in his life; the artwork reveals his personality and character traits, which adds so much to the story.

    Speaking of the story, Batman: Noel is one of the better graphic novels I have read in a long time. It’s almost like a “What If Charles Dickens Wrote The Batman?” Elseworlds volume. Putting Batman in yet another version of A Christmas Carol (second only to Dracula as retold tales) seemed kind of ridiculous, but it works in amazing fashion and makes for an excellent, satisfying read. I really liked the twist of the tale-teller and the listener at the end of the story, too.

    I usually try to read/watch/listen to at least one version of A Christmas Carol every year on Christmas Eve. I think that Batman:Noel might be an annual addition to that tradition. Highly recommended for Batman fans, Charles Dickens fans, and fans of A Christmas Carol.
  • (3/5)
    Somewhat ham-fisted but enjoyable.