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Batman: Dark Victory

Batman: Dark Victory

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Batman: Dark Victory

Bewertungen:
3/5 (305 Bewertungen)
Länge:
393 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709744
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Der vielgesuchte Klassiker in brandneuer Auflage! Während der erfolgreichen Maxiserie DAS LANGE HALLOWEEN musste Batman einem gefährlichen Serienmörder namens Holiday das Handwerk legen, der immer an Feiertagen sein grausiges Werk verrichtete. Doch nun bekommt es der Dunkle Ritter mit einem weiteren Mörder zu tun, der direkt an die Taten von Holiday anzuknüpfen scheint! Bedeutet das etwa, der wahre Täter befindet sich noch auf freiem Fuß? Oder wer sonst ist der geheimnisvolle Gegner, der seine makabren Tatorte mit Rätseln zu schmücken pflegt? Und was hat der ehemalige Staatsanwalt Harvey Dent alias Two-Face mit der Sache zu tun? Dieser Band enthält die abgeschlossene dreizehnteilige US-Maxiserie Batman: Dark Victory, geschrieben von Jeph Loeb (BATMAN: DAS LANGE HALLOWEEN, HUSH), mit Zeichnungen von Tim Sale (SPIDER-MAN: BLAU, CATWOMAN: DAMALS IN ROM). .
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709744
Format:
Buch

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Batman denken

3.1
305 Bewertungen / 17 Rezensionen
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Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    A good followup to "The Long Halloween" but tacking in a Robin origin story, compelling as it was with the parallel presentations, was a poor decision. Instead of getting the attention it deserved, the subplot felt rushed and neglected.
  • (4/5)
    It obviously steals a lot from Long Halloween, but the Hangman story is still pretty good, especially in the way it manages to incorporate Robin into the story, making him believably useful. It does seem to leave a lot unanswered, though, and I can't be the only one who thought Gilda Dent should have returned in some fashion.
  • (5/5)
    I think I actually liked this even a little better than The Long Halloween. Enjoyable art and a twist that I somehow didn't see coming (call me foolish). If you liked The Long Halloween, pick this up as well.
  • (3/5)
    After a breakout at Arkham Asylum, a serial killer starts targeting current and former police officers, murdering one on each holiday. With enemies ranging from Holiday to Solomon Grundy to Two Face all on the loose, Batman and James Gordon are both stumped as to who the killer may be.I heard good things about this compilation and was excited to read it. However, I was soon disappointed. The plot is really rather thin, but it is convoluted by having numerous characters drop in and out of the narrative, including mobster, lawyers, and more. The resolution was really rather anticlimactic, especially after having the mystery recapped at the beginning of every chapter. I know this is a consequence of having originally been published in single issue format, but it became rather tedious to hear over and over again how a serial killer was on the hunt every holiday, how Two Face was formerly Harvey Dent, etc.The illustrations are technically fine, but the black-and-white palette makes it sometimes difficult to follow the action.
  • (5/5)
    In Batman: Dark Victory, Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale continue the story begun in their Long Halloween, itself a follow-up to Frank Miller’s Batman: Year One. A new killer dubbed the hangman begins killing police with a connection to Commissioner Gordon on various holidays, possibly to prove that Alberto Falcone, son of deceased mob boss Carmine Falcone, was not the true Holiday killer. Gordon also clashed with the new District Attorney, Janice Porter, who appears to have too close a connection to the Falcone family. In an attempt to free her brother from Arkham Asylum and kill Two-Face, Sofia Gigante Falcone hires the men who provided the acid used on Harvey Dent to storm the asylum. In the process, they free the Mad Hatter, Scarecrow, Joker, and Poison Ivy while Two-Face escapes. He recruits the various villains to aid him in attacking the mob, incidentally throwing off suspicion that he is also the Hangman. The 13-issue story also establishes Anthony Zucco as a member of the Moroni crime family, taking time to build his role prior to his killing of the Flying Graysons, which allows Loeb and Sale to introduce their version of Robin. Though Sale was reticent to include Robin, Loeb eventually convinced him and the two introduced the character in a way that makes sense to the world they crafted in these two books. Loeb and Sale later returned to the events surrounding Catwoman and her disappearance to Italy (pg. 347) for their interquel, Catwoman: When in Rome. Like The Long Halloween, this effectively follows the world Miller established in Year One, though unlike the first volume, it is less capable of standing on its own. That said, the story is a classic Batman tale and a must-read for all fans.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't like it quite as much as The Long Halloween -- TLH felt contained, recursive, atmospheric. DV expands a little more, dealing with most of the same plot lines but in a way that feels more like a big Batman 'verse. So, I loved it as a Batman story, and it has a lot of great villain action including supervillains and mobsters. It just felt slightly different. That recursive quality is kind of built in though, expanding from lines of dialogue and repetitive motifs to a whole book that repeats and expands the previous one, and if that isn't Batman, I don't know what is. It's still a good murder mystery though, and if anything it was easier to follow than TLH. Also the art is great. It's not entirely realistic, and some shots are more realistic than others, and it creates a really amazing "slightly unhinged" feeling for Gotham City with a lot of striking panels, especially of the villains. I liked the art in TLH too, it's the same team, but this is a step even beyond that.
  • (5/5)
    A sequel to The Long Halloween and while many might disagree, I felt this to be a better story. Taking the same theme as it's predecessor, someone is killing one person on each holiday. This time, it's Gotham's Finest that are the victims. A great tale with fantastic writing and art work.
  • (4/5)
    This is a sequel to "Batman: Long Halloween". The story shows Batman grappling with the events of that story - how to deal with Harvey Dent becoming Two-Face, how to deal with the idea of trust at all - as well as the more literal fallout of dealing with the remnants of the Falcone family. Then, between a breakout at Arkham Asylum and a new serial killer emerging, killing only police officers, Batman, Commissioner Gordon, and the ever-ambiguous Catwoman must get to the bottom of the crime.The story is interesting, the emergence of Robin is well-done (especially Alfred's flashbacks), and I liked Catwoman's role. I wish Porter had been better used, as that seemed a bit cliched and tired. Overall, though, this is a good read and once that holds up to The Long Halloween.
  • (4/5)
    Not quite as solid as Long Halloween, I'd say that Dark Victory proves itself a strong entry in the Batman canon. Loeb and Sale's post-Year One stories (DV and LH) go a long way towards fleshing out Batman and Bruce Wayne both, and built up the best take on the Harvey Dent/Two-Face Bruce Wayne/Batman relationship of any version before or since. To a certain degree, DV is LH Redux, which is both its saving grace and its Achilles heel. More of the same is not necessarily bad (see: some of the better movie sequels), but it would have been nice to see it grow beyond.
  • (4/5)
    This sequel to "The Long Halloween" delves into the war between Gotham's organized crime families and the chaotic team of "freaks" that have escaped from Gotham. Batman is aided (and sometimes hindered) by Commissioner Gordon and the GCPD, new D.A. Janice Porter, Catwoman, and Robin. There's a new serial killer on the loose, the Hang Man, who kills a cop on each holiday, placing a game of hang-man on the victim. If you like your Gotham villains, then you're in for a treat. You get to see a bit of each villain, though Two-Face plays a larger part. This is also an excellent introduction to Robin... he's only a tad cheesy (doesn't he have to be?). Loeb/Sale contrast the Graysons' deaths with those of the Waynes', as well as how both orphans dealt with the tragedy. Robin's a much more hopeful character.The artwork is incredible. I loved it! My only complaint is that the story can get somewhat repetitive... if you've read "The Long Halloween," you feel like you're following the same path, using the same pacing. Also, there's a narrative at the start of each chapter reiterating the loss of Harvey Dent... seriously, I get it after the first chapters. I don't know if the chapters were released individually, but in a bound format, it can get a bit annoying.All in all, this is a great Batman story, and a nice followup to "The Long Halloween." You just might want to give yourself a little time inbetween readings.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this one even better than "The Long Halloween". After the killer known as Holiday has been captured, Gotham is once again under attack by someone using a similar approach: this time, the victims are cops, who are hanged one by one, and left with a note pinned to them, on which is a game of hangman. Batman at first tries to solve these crimes on his own, but it isn't until he finds a companion in the form of Robin that he finds out who's behind the attacks.The overall theme of this story arc is Batman's loneliness. Sometimes I wished the authors would've made it a little more subtle, but the lack of subtlety doesn't actually hurt. Well, it does hurt in that one really, really hurts for Batman and Bruce Wayne. So when Batman finds his Robin, it's a relief for the reader, too. I've read a few Batman comics now (still only a fraction of what is out there), and my feelings for Robin are ambivalent at best. I don't hate him, but I can see why some people might not like him. In here, however, I felt he was completely likeable; and I loved how Loeb and Sale chose to tell a story that every reader already knows anyway in a way that felt new and real. I especially loved the way the parallels between Bruce and Dick's fates were shown (and Alfred's reaction).In fact, that is something that's impressed me again and again, the more Batman I've read (and by the way, I doubt there'll ever be a point where I won't feel like a newbie to this) - the way the different authors always manage to give the myth a new shape, a new twist. Because the story of how Bruce Wayne became Batman is, at this point, one almost everybody in Western culture knows (ok, I'm probably exaggerating, but a lot of people know it). Still some manage to tell it in a way that still moves.And the pain. And the loneliness. I've found it gets a bit much after a while, so I'm trying to keep the dosage at an acceptable level, but overall I'm still loving the darkness of it. The world of Batman - definitely one of my favourite discoveries of the year.
  • (2/5)
    A far inferior sequel/knockoff of Long Halloween.
  • (4/5)

    Seven out of ten. CBR format.

    A continuation of 'Batman: Long Halloween', the plot focuses on a series of murders involving Gotham City police officers by a mysterious serial killer only known as The Hangman - the newly escaped Two-Face and the remnants of the Falcone family are the prime suspects.

  • (5/5)
    Great follow-up to The Long Halloween. Young Jim Gordon, the early years of Two-Face, and best of all Dick's determined little face!
  • (4/5)
    Goodness, this was longer than I'd expected. Clocking in at nearly 400 pages, we manage to see nearly every Batman villain (maybe it was all of them, come to think of it) following a break-out from Arkham. And yet somehow that's not the thrust of the story. It somehow manages to be more political in some ways, more a mystery than some of the other Batman titles.

    I think this might be getting 4 stars because it's another Loeb/Sale book. Also because anything I couldn't follow is being blamed on the late hour and my sleepiness. But I did enjoy this--more than Haunted Knight, though less than The Long Halloween.
  • (5/5)
    A good story thats actually about the origin of Robin.
  • (4/5)
    A good, dark, tale of crime and coping with loss as well as an investigation into Batmans coping strategies. Very dark at times, this ask so introduces Robin, an event that has been both better & worse in other titles. I enjoyed this but I'm not sure it's art is up to the story telling. Apart from that, very good and a worthy successor to The Long Halloween.