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Fables, Band 1 - Legenden im Exil

Fables, Band 1 - Legenden im Exil

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Fables, Band 1 - Legenden im Exil

Bewertungen:
3/5 (1.625 Bewertungen)
Länge:
129 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783736710825
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

WER HAT ROSE RED UMGEBRACHT? In Fabletown, wo Märchenfiguren mit gewöhnlichen New Yorkern zusammenleben, stellen sich alle diese Frage. Aber nur der große böse Wolf ist in der Lage, diesen Fall zu lösen – und gemeinsam mit Snow White, Roses Schwester, die Gemeinschaft von Fabletown vor dem Zerfall zu bewahren. FABLES: LEGENDEN IM EXIL versammelt die ersten fünf Ausgaben der neuen VERTIGO-Serie von Bill Willingham (vorzüglich illustriert von Lan Medina, Steve Leialoha und Craig Hamilton) und enthält zusätzlich eine FABLES-Kurzgeschichte, ebenfalls geschrieben von Bill Willingham und von ihm selbst illustriert.
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783736710825
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Bill Willingham is the critically-acclaimed, award-winning creator of several iconic comic book series, including the bestselling Fables franchise. In 2003, its first year of publication, Fables won the prestigious Eisner award for Best New Series, and has gone on to win fourteen Eisners to date. Bill lives in the wild and frosty woods of Minnesota.


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  • (5/5)
    Snow White Vorpal Sword = Epic Win.
  • (4/5)
    This is my first time reading a “graphic novel” and I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. Tucker chose this title for me because he knew I loved “fairy tales” and the characters in this story are all from famous children’s fairy tales. In addition, this is a mystery story, another of my favorite genres. The premise behind the story is that a long time ago something began attacking the fairy lands and destroying the characters. Finally the remaining characters from far flung lands had to flee and they ended up in New York where they had to learn to get along and create a secret sub-culture in order to co-exist with the “mundies”—i.e. humans. The story begins with the discovery of a crime—it looks as if Rose Red has been possibly murdered. Snow White, her sister, is the one who is in charge of the community (King Cole is the ceremonial and nominal ruler, he delegates all decisions to Snow) and Biggy Wolf (i.e. Big, Bad Wolf in human form) is the detective. The story is interesting and somewhat reminds me of the comic books I read as a child except the art is much more detailed and necessary to the plot I discovered when I realized I missed some clues by not spending enough looking at the pictures! I will be exploring more graphic novels.
  • (5/5)
    What if characters from fairy tales were real? What if they lived in the real world? How would they survive? How would magic and modern technology interact? That's part of the premise of the Fables series published by DC Comics' Vertigo line. In this series, the Homelands--the worlds of the people and creatures in our storybooks--have been invaded and conquered by an entity known as the Adversary, causing many to seek asylum in other dimensions. A fair number have ended up in our world, making their home in an apartment complex in New York State. They run their own little community there, complete with a mayor, sheriff and staff. In this first collection, Rose Red, the sister of deputy mayor Snow White, has apparently been murdered. Sherriff Bigby Wolf has to solve the case. Who killed Rose Red? Was it her boyfriend Jack Horner? Her former lover, Prince Charming? Was it suicide? Or is it something even more diabolical? All in all, Mr. Willingham weaves an interesting tale, giving a new twist to many characters whom we've loved for years.--J.
  • (5/5)
    The people of fairy tales have escaped into the mundane world as their lands were ravaged and taken over by the Adversary. Ole King Cole is the mayor of Fabletown and Snow White is second in charge. This volume reads like a classic noir detective as Snow White's sister's apartment is found to be a bloody carnage with Rose Red herself missing. With no body to know whether he is looking at for a murderer or kidnapper Bigby Wolf (the law of Fabletown) sets off to track down Rose Red and solve the case.The book is peopled with characters from fairy tales such as the above mentioned plus Prince Charming, Pinocchio, one of the Three Little Pigs, Bluebeard, Beauty and the Beast and many more. It is so much fun to see these characters depicted in this way, in a very adult manner. The book also ends with a very good short story which explains how the fairytale lands were attacked and especially focuses on how Snow White and Bigby Wolf found their way to Fabletown.I loved this book! The story told was gripping and I loved the artwork, which imitates the old comic book style of the 70s and earlier. Now I know why everybody is so addicted to these books as I can't imagine not continuing on with Volume #2. There are even a couple of prequels and a spin-off series called Jack of Fables. Highly recommended to any adult who loves fairy tale retellings.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this. Great dialogue which had me laughing out loud in places. The crime aspect of the story a little transparent but not enough to detract from the enjoyment. Artwork is brilliant though I feel I maybe falling a little in love Snow White (I think it must be the dark hair!) Looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    I was recently introduced to the fantastical and captivating world of graphic novels through Bill Willingham’s Fables.I have long admired the cover art of the Fables collections and, as I love fairy tale retellings and fractured fairy tales, I have no idea what took me so long to pick up the first volume. I am ecstatic that I finally did! I haven’t been this excited over a story since reading The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly last year. I can’t get enough!Each volume is beautifully told and illustrated. The stories pull the reader in. They draw on the familiar characters of childhood fairy tales, albeit wonderfully fractured and grim. The tales range in mood from whimsical to touching or tragic. Each volume draws the reader further into the world of Fabletown and I try not to devour them all in one sitting. I can’t say enough how wonderful these graphic novels are.
  • (4/5)
    From the back of the book:Who killed Rose Red? In Fabletown, where fairy tale legends live alongside regular New Yorkers, the question is all anyone can talk about. But only the Big Bad Wolf can actually solve the case- and, along with Rose's sister Snow White, keep the Fabletown community from coming apart at the seams.My Thoughts:This was my 1st foray into graphic novels and I enjoyed the experience. It seems everyone and their brother are enjoying graphic novels and it convinced me that I must give them a try. I started with the Fables series as Ladytink and a few others seemed to be really liking these so it seemed like a good place to start. And it was! Legends in Exile is a fast-paced whodunnit filled with fairy tale characters. It was an easy read that I finished in one sitting...I just couldn't put it down. I knew that there were clues that I was missing but I just didn't care and let the story take me along for the ride. The pictures added to the story for sure and it was a neat experience all around. Except this is an adult story and it kept catching my son's attention. He wanted to know what Mommy was reading (usually he could care less) and wanted to look at all of the pictures too. There wasn't anything awful just not the type of book that I wanted him looking at :) So we busted out a Hulk graphic novel for him and he was content looking at his own pictures. There isn't much else to say about this one except if you are like I was and on the edge on whether or not to give graphic novels a try...well, just try them. It was definitely a worthwhile experience and I will be reading more in the future!
  • (4/5)
    All the fairy tale creatures of old have created a secret community in New York City to hide from an enemy known only as the Adversary. When one of the fable apartments is found trashed and covered in blood, its occupant missing, the sheriff of Fabletown is charged with solving the mystery. This mystery is heavy on characters, but easy to follow because they are all familiar: the Big Bad Wolf, Snow White, Bluebeard, Prince Charming, and so on. The modern take on the fables is lots of fun, and there is a considerable amount of humor besides.
  • (4/5)
    I've heard good things about this series and have almost picked it up many times over the past year or so. I finally broke down and grabbed a copy a couple of weeks ago and I'm really glad I did.I've enjoyed a lot of the "fairy tale retelling" stories that have been coming around lately, some more than others. What I found even more fun about this premise is that the fairy tale characters have been dislocated from their fairy tale worlds and are now living in our world…trying to 'fit in' but also striving to maintain their own identities.The character development and presentation was excellent. I loved the adult depth given to these characters that are otherwise fairly 2-dimensional. Seeing Jack (of Beanstalk fame) as a conniving, lying, scheming, unsuccessful con-man of sorts was great. Snow White as the semi-snobbish clean cut acting-leader felt a little flat at first, but as the story went on and we saw more into her personality, she became even more intriguing. Prince Charming was great as the over-confident schmoozer. But my favorite had to be the portrayal of "Bigby" (as in "Big Bad" Wolf) as a sort of noir detective for the fairy tale folks. Having just recently read Red Harvest, I had a feel for the hard-boiled detective and really liked Bigby's portrayal.The art in this novel was well done and a lot of fun. The central art was clean and nice and helped the story along….while at the same time, the artist had a lot of fun along the periphery by adding in small details that added humor or tension to the scenes and may not even be picked up on (I'm sure I missed a lot of the subtleties).The story was engaging and very interesting. At the heart of this particular book (the first in the series), there was some focus on introducing us to the characters. By doing it through the course of a murder mystery, it allowed the author to provide backstory without it sounding like contrived monologues. The mystery itself was a lot of fun and very engaging. I wish I could say I had it figured out before the very end…but I can't. I did suspect something along the lines of what happened, but not exactly as it played out, which (in my opinion) is the way a good mystery novel should be framed (the reader shouldn't be able to figure things out too easily, but should feel like they came just inches behind the detective).I was a little turned off by the amount of swearing in the book (I would love to have been able to share this with my kids, but the language will definitely make me keep it out of their hands for at least the next few years). There were a couple of scenes of violence which were a little over the top (especially for young readers), but weren't overly graphic or offensive. And the one "sex scene" and the couple of suggestive panels we in the PG to PG-13 range. Overall, a movie version of the book would probably receive a PG-13 rating, possibly pushed to R if they decided to overplay the language/violence or expound on the sex. If the language was toned down a bit, it could probably be a solid PG.Overall, this was a great read and a very fun world filled with wonderful characters. I'm definitely planning to follow this series (from the B&N shelf, it looks like there are 10+ books already). I may have to increase my book allowance so I can catch up more quickly. ****4 stars
  • (3/5)
    An intro to the Fable universe, where fairy tale characters are living a secret life in the modern world, and someone is taking them out one by one. Huge warning here: when it says it is meant for mature readers, it means it. This downloadable PDF consists of scans of the pages of the first chapter of an actual graphic novel. As such, the vertical nature of the comic does not fit well with a screen, requiring either much scrolling to see a page or a full page view where the text is tiny. Colors are mostly flat, with little shading or variation. Not meant for children at all, the content is sex and murder, and is rather graphic. It is only the first chapter available online, as well, so don't expect any story resolution.
  • (5/5)
    Still completely fabulous!
  • (5/5)
    I love this graphic novel. Fairytale characters are re-introduced and reconstructed in this groundbreaking new series. I love fairytales and it is wonderful to see characters I love (and hate) in new and interesting roles!
  • (4/5)
    The Fables graphic novels had caught my eye more than once at the comic shop, and I finally decided to give them a try. (I am always a little wary of committing myself to a new series of anything; single-volume graphic novels and movies demand less time and money than long-running comics and tv shows.) The characters are grittily real, despite their fairy-tale origins, so it's easy enough to suspend my disbelief and fall into the story. From the very beginning, this series has beautiful art, interesting plot twists, and some really great lines.
  • (4/5)
    Fables Vol. 1: Legends in Exile by Bill Willingham and Lan Medina collects the first 5 issues of the Fables series published by the DC Comics imprint, Vertigo. It follows the adventures of the surviving occupants of the fairy tales who have been exiled into the mundane real world after their kingdoms have been overtaken by the Adversary. The story arc, "Legends in Exile," is basically a set up to the rest of the series. It lays the groundwork of the back story of the Adversary and introduces the characters and the concept of Fabletown. This is definitely not the fairy tale characters of our childhood; these characters are grown-up, NYC-hardened versions of the fairy tales of old. I'm interested to see where this story goes.
  • (4/5)
    My best friend absolutely loves this series and I found a bunch of them at the library so I'm trying it out. It was fun and at times funny. I like the overall idea of fairy tales being chased into the modern world by some dark force. But I've never really been one for the "urban fantasy" genre (if that's what it's called).I like my fantasy well... fantastic. References to real modern real world things takes me out of the story and make it seem kind of silly. So overall I'd give...more My best friend absolutely loves this series and I found a bunch of them at the library so I'm trying it out. It was fun and at times funny. I like the overall idea of fairy tales being chased into the modern world by some dark force. But I've never really been one for the "urban fantasy" genre (if that's what it's called).I like my fantasy well... fantastic. References to real modern real world things takes me out of the story and make it seem kind of silly. So overall I'd give this closer to 3.5 stars. I'll probably read a couple more of them to see if it gets to be more to my liking.
  • (4/5)
    This was a most original series. I thought it was interesting to see the somewhat twisted version of the classic fairytales brought to life. While most definitely not for kids, I think it can be enjoyed by a wide audience familiar with the tales.
  • (2/5)
    The setting was very promising --fairy tales characters live hidden in New York after being exiled from their magical kingdoms--, but this first volume on the graphic novel series didn't deliver on those promises: The novelty wore off quickly, and the murder mystery plot that spans the volume turned out to be inconsequential. Good artwork, but I don't think it will make me go and get the rest of the series.
  • (4/5)
    I reread this volume recently, just to relvie the story. Certainly the world Willingham created is less "deep" in this initial telling, but the foundation is there. In truth, the whole thing could not have been laid out at first, but this little murder mystery does a good job in introducing the major characters and conflicts.Just as Neil Gaiman's Sandman series starts small and grows exponentially, so too does Fables, and I am amazed at how naturally and how wonderfully the world has grown from the first volume to the latest. Each volume pushes open more doors while remaining true to the original core. It's a wonderful read.
  • (4/5)
    Fables is one of the many comic series that has been calling to me for quite some time, and yet I have managed to put off reading them for just as long. Not only does Fables catch my eye every time I'm in the comic shop, it also came highly recommended to me by several people whose opinions I trust. So, when I discovered that the local branch of my public library has the series, I snatched up the first volume, Legends in Exile, which collects issues one through five in addition to a previously unpublished short story.I absolutely love the premise behind Fables, which is of course introduced in Legends in Exile Actually, the title gives a pretty good indication of it. Characters of legend, fables, myths, and fairy tales from all of the world have fled to New York, pursued by an entity known only as the Adversary who has taken over their wealth, properties, and homelands. Those that are human seeming live in disguise in the New York City with Old King Cole as the Mayor, Snow White as his second in command, and a complete cast of others keeping the refugees together in some semblance of a community known as Fabletown, while their inhuman counterparts remain on a large farm in upstate New York.Beyond the general introduction to the story so far, there is a murder mystery to be solved by the Fabletown sheriff Bigby Wolf (aka Big Bad Wolf, among other things). Snow White's sister Rose Red has gone missing--her apartment is in shambles and blood is everywhere. Bigby has plenty of suspects, from Rose's on-again off-again boyfriend Jack (of beanstalk and giant-killing infamy), to her lover Bluebeard (yes, that Bluebeard), and even Snow White herself. Overall, the mystery plot-line wasn't that great, but I loved the interactions between characters from completely different stories. Bigby was a personal favorite.The short story wasn't anything spectacular either, but it was enjoyable. It gives more background for several of the characters, particularly that of the Wolf. None of the characters are explicitly identified, but it's fairly obvious which characters are implied. The story was a lovely addition to the volume and lent a bit more substance to it as a whole.The artwork is very well done and very consistent (inconsistency is a pet peeve of mine). Completely in color, and generally realistic--these are fairy tales we're talking about--it was a delight to look at. As already mentioned, I love the concept behind Fables. Even though the first volume wasn't a particularly strong introduction to the series, there were enough highlights that I'm definitely going to have to pick up the next volume Animal Farm.
  • (4/5)
    If you enjoy the occasional graphic novel, I recommend this series. All of the Fables that we know and love from all of the bedtime stories, Disney movies, and Grimm's faery tales are forced to emmigrate from their homes by the Adversary and immegrate to the only land not yet fallen, our land. All of the fables that can pass as human live in a burrough in NYC, and all the animal like fables live on a farm in upstate New York. Action, adventure, mystery, and love.
  • (4/5)
    Read on June 16, 2014I'm not a reader of graphic novels, but I think it's just because I hadn't discovered the right one for me. FABLES is IT. It's a much grittier version of ABC's Once Upon a Time (and FABLES came first). I love what Willingham & Co have done with twisting the characters we're all so familiar with (or maybe some we've forgotten -- I mean, who is Rose Red?). Snow White's discussion with Beauty & the Beast is a great introduction to how this world is turned upside down from what we know -- B&B have problems, Snow White & Charming are divorced -- because how ARE these characters supposed to make their love last for centuries?The central mystery of Legends in Exile is about the disappearance/possible murder of Rose Red, Snow's estranged sister. I wasn't crazy about this aspect, but it's a great introduction into the world of Fabletown.
  • (3/5)
    I really, really don't like the art, but the story is interesting. The basic premise is all these Fable characters are living in New York and have a sort of underground society with a Mayor/Deputy Mayor and everything. In this first volume it's Rose Red whose blood is found, and the Big Bad Wolf (in charge of the Fables' society's security) and Snow White (divorced from Prince Charming and the Deputy Mayor) are on the case.I liked that Prince Charming was a douche and the same guy in the different fables. But I didn't find myself liking too many of the characters or their stories in the comic.I read this because so many people were saying the TV Show (Once Upon a Time) ripped this off, but I couldn't see it, and I think that although at their core they may have started as the same, Once Upon a Time and these comic books are two totally different animals for sure.
  • (4/5)
    Blew through the entire series in a couple of weeks (Who knew it was so much faster to read graphic novels that 200-300 pagers?!) Liked them all except the Jack crossover one (meh.) The change in illustrators and the consequent change in the look of the characters from volume to volume was disconcerting though. I definitely preferred some illustration styles over others.
  • (4/5)
    The premise of Fables is pretty well known at this point, not because of the graphic novels themselves, but because of the TV show Once Upon a Time. They are not the same thing, but Fables (which came first) shares the same basic story. Fairy tale characters have been transplanted from their home world into our world. They have no way of getting back and have to make it here without their fortunes and castles, etc.I've been hearing about this series for awhile and I'm so glad I finally checked it out. The fable characters live in a secret society of sorts in New York City. The Big Bad Wolf runs the community's security. Old King Cole is the Mayor and Snow White serves as the Deputy Mayor. This volume deals with the disappearance of Snow's sister Rose Red.The characters are snarky and fun. I love the way they play with the assumed ideas about them, like Prince Charming, who is a womanizer in Fables instead of a hero. Yes, the art is definitely stereotypical comic book style. Maybe we can one day have good female characters who aren't ridiculous caricatures of what a woman actually looks like, but it's a small complaint when the story is this fun. BOTTOM LINE: So far I love the series and I can't wait to read more.  
  • (3/5)
    Who killed Rose Red? In this noir-ish collection of the first five issues of Fables, that is the central question in Fabletown. Exiled to the mundane world when their fairy tale kingdoms are overtaken by the Adversary, a wide array of characters are forced to make a whole new community for themselves. But when Rose Red's apartment is found covered with blood there's no shortage of suspects for her possible murder.I've been meaning to get around to this series for ages, and I'm glad I finally did. A tad darker than I had imagined these stories are still well plotted and drawn. If you're a fan of fairy tale retellings, these should definitely be given a try.
  • (4/5)
    I very nearly quit half-way through, utterly disgusted at the nasty, pointless, sordid little story that was being presented. But I slogged through to the end, and it did get much better - the solution is really stupid, but not as foul as the middle of the story suggested. The perpetrators are childishly dumb, but that seems to be a permanent problem for a lot of them - something to do with the immortality? And there are problems (as many other fairy-tale retellings have dealt with) with the same name in different stories - for instance, the Snow White who has a sister Rose Red didn't marry Prince Charming. That's just ignored here - she's the princess, her sister is a commoner, that's the way it is. Annoys me, because I do know both stories. There's hints of another story - the aside with Pinocchio seems to be laying some groundwork. Not sure if it will come up in the next issue, or much later, but there's definitely something there. I don't like the text story at the end - or rather, that's a fine story, but the character presented there doesn't jibe with the one presented in the main story at all. And he's had 200 years to change, so maybe his pop culture awareness isn't completely off - but the way he deals with Snow White is. He had a lot longer than that to set his habits and perceptions, and his uncertainty just doesn't work...yeah, it really bothers me. I'm going to pretend that was about two other people.
  • (4/5)
    I think I am really going to enjoy this series as I was pretty impressed with this first volume. I've always been a fan of fairy tales (despite some of their shady moral lessons) so I was interested to see what new life Bill Willingham was going to bring to these classic characters. Overall, I thought he did a great job of bringing a more modern twist to these characters that they desperately needed. Especially on the princess front.I was most impressed with his modern depiction of Snow White. Snow White was always my least favorite since I always considered her as the weakest of all the princesses. Now, Snow White has stepped it up and become the person in charge of Fabletown. She's a take-charge woman who doesn't allow people to walk all over her, and she knows how to run a town.It also turns out that Prince Charming is an arrogant womanizer who just uses whatever woman he finds would be most convenient to his needs and desires, and for this, most people in Fabletown look down on him. Especially his various ex-wives and lovers. I found this to be interesting, and rather fitting, since I always felt that Prince Charming was just a little too charming to be genuine.I am also a fan of the art for this series. It has an older comic book feel that I have always enjoyed. It's the type of art that really helps the story along, but doesn't distract from the story. This is one of those stories that can really carry itself without having overly overt images to keep the reader's attention. The story itself is engrossing, and never once did I want to put it down.My only issue with this one was that there were a few parts that didn't seem to fit in with the rest of the story. They felt more like an attempt to put as many recognizable fable characters as they could, which I felt they didn't have to do. The characters they chose for the the main story line where enough to make the reader really feel that they were in a world made-up of fairy tale characters. The little extra scenes weren't needed for this. Maybe they were inserted because these characters come up later, but these scenes felt very stand alone, not like there was going to be something more to the story later. They were just random. However, there were very few of these scenes and when they came up, they didn't last long. Maybe a page. So it's really not a big complaint.In the end, I'm excited to continue reading this series. I find the characters to be intriguing and I thought that the plot was interesting and well-paced. I would recommend this to most graphic novel/comic fan, as well as those who have always had an interest in fables and fairy tales. Even for those you never really liked them, I would give this new adaptation a chance, since it's not just Snow White that goes through some drastic changes.
  • (4/5)
    Very good! This is a series that I meant to get into for a long time, and it is well worth the read. Beautiful art as well.
  • (4/5)
    I read this because we've been playing the TT game "The Wolf Among Us," and I was curious about the world. I do enjoy both versions of the world (game and graphic novel), though they are ever so slightly different in tone and characterization. Worth a read for fairy tale fans who don't mind their tales slightly altered and a bit grim.
  • (5/5)
    This is a compelling, fun, very modern take on our fairy tale heritage. I enjoyed it and plan to read the entire run.