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Fables, Band 11 - Der gute Prinz

Fables, Band 11 - Der gute Prinz

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Fables, Band 11 - Der gute Prinz

Bewertungen:
4/5 (429 Bewertungen)
Länge:
239 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783736711037
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Als zwischen den Truppen des Feindes und den freien Fables in der Welt der Normalsterblichen ein vernichtender Krieg auszubrechen droht, sieht es ganz so aus, als hinge alles von dem einfachen Hausmeister ab, den wir unter dem Namen Flycatcher kennen. Nachdem er seine Amnesie überwunden hat, die von den schlimmen Erlebnissen in der Heimat herrührten und jahrhundertelang andauerten, liegt ein langer Weg vor Prinz Ambrose (wie man ihn damals in glücklicheren Zeiten nannte) – und der führt ihn ins Land der Toten und weiter, mitten hinein ins Herz des feindlichen Reiches. Und dort erwartet den wunderlichen Helden, dessen größte Tugend Bescheidenheit ist, seine schwierigste Prüfung – und von ihrem Ausgang hängt die Zukunft Fabletowns und der Heimatländer ab.
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783736711037
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Bill Willingham is the critically-acclaimed, award-winning creator of several iconic comic book series, including the bestselling Fables franchise. In 2003, its first year of publication, Fables won the prestigious Eisner award for Best New Series, and has gone on to win fourteen Eisners to date. Bill lives in the wild and frosty woods of Minnesota.


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429 Bewertungen / 22 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    This story included the transformation of Prince Ambrose and a very frustrating reminder of the tragedy that is Boy Blue's love life.
  • (4/5)
    Finally, yes, finally! This was a long time coming, and it felt so god damn good.
  • (5/5)
    I'm beginning to think that Willingham is at his best when he abandons day-to-day reality and just goes straight for "mythic." The Good Prince is easily the strongest volume of Fables so far, and a lot of that has to do with the somewhat ethereal nature of it. Not only do we finally find out the truth about Flycatcher, we follow him as he discovers his destiny, and it's about as far removed from the mundane world as we could possibly get. More in this vein would be very much appreciated; for the first time, I was anxious to move on to the next volume - which unfortunately I did not own!
  • (5/5)
    As I often do, I read this all at a go today. It's the thickest collection, and one of the best. A couple of the issues have a different artist. I didn't much care for that artist's work - it seemed much more cartoonish than the rest of the series. But the art was good enough to get the point across, and thankfully brief.

    I just wish I didn't have to wait for November 2008 to read the next one!
  • (5/5)
    I adored this one! Flycatcher has always been one of my favorite Fable characters and I've been dying to get more of his back story. Flycatcher has been wallowing in misery unsure of how to go about living not knowing whether his family is alive or dead in the homelands. Deep in his heart, he knows it's not good. When Bufkin accidentally breaks the Forsworn Knight his spirit is set free and starts to guide Flycatcher. Together they sneak into the Homelands and created the strongest, purest little kingdom that is fast becoming a huge thorn in the adversary's side. Go Flycatcher go!
  • (4/5)
    Fabletown is preparing for the war against the Empire. Intensive training is being secretly carried out but although we are kept up to date with many of the Fabletown folk, the main story is about the good prince of the title. Not wanting to give too much away, I will just say that the good prince goes off on a mission and has dealings with the Empire while creating his own kingdom. He is an unlikely hero, but it appears that he has a great deal to do with the future of both Fabletown as well as the Homelands. I was a little disconcerted by the artwork that was done by different artists in this volume, in particular the chapter entitled “The Birthday Secret” was quite jarring. But overall Volume 10 with the epic story of The Good Prince is another winner in this consistently good series.
  • (5/5)
    The best one yet, I think. Fables has managed to settle into a sweet groove and stay there despite having spent its initial gimmick (modern-day fairytales!), gone through a couple of major cast shifts (goodbye Bluebeard and Jack, hello Mowgli, Red Riding Hood, Frau Totenkinder . . . .), revealed its central mystery (WHO IS THE ADVERSARY?), etc. This is a sweet and goodhearted tale about Flycatcher that manages to still be expansive both physically (longer than the average Fables trade, which is nice) and in concept (verging, as much as the series has so far, on the epic). At this rate Willingham might be able to keep things going indefinitely before things start to suck, or at least till the mid-'80s like Spider-Man.
  • (5/5)
    The Good Prince is the tenth installment of Fables, a graphic novel series about characters from various fables which had been exiled from their Homelands by an evil emperor and have found a refuge in modern day New York. Unfortunately, they cannot spend their days in peace as the enemy threatens a total war to annihilate the colony. The stories are full of adventure, humor and strangely believable story lines. In this issue the tale of Prince Ambrose, or as all Fables know him Flycatcher the Janitor, is recounted and how he has to face many perils to finally avenge his family. This book is one of the best so far and an absolute joy to read with an epic story, romance and many surprises. I can highly recommend Fables and The Good Prince to anyone interested in graphic novels and modern fairy tales.
  • (4/5)
    Again an amazing collection of Fables. This time the main story is a very epic, very cohesive story, almost a faery-tale (gasp!) about an unlikely hero. The main story arc goes forward, not in leaps, but with a steady pace.I liked very much the interlude about the Wolf family secret, drawn by Aaron Alexovich. At first I was a bit turned away by his style, but then came to realise that it suited the light tone of the story bit perfectly. I do hope that we get to see more of the cubs in the future.
  • (4/5)
    When Flycatcher's selective amnesia finally fades, he heads back to the Homelands to take the ultimate revenge against the Adversary.Flycatcher’s story was my favourite from 1001 NIGHTS OF SNOWFALL, and I was overjoyed to learn that the tenth story arc of the ongoing series would focus in on him. And I’ll tell you, Willingham and Buckingham didn’t disappoint me in the slightest. HOMELANDS is still my favourite volume, (gotta love that Boy Blue), but this one’s pretty far up there.It’s just such a nice book! Flycatcher’s revenge is absolutely perfect. He does have a few wild fantasies about killing every goblin in the Homelands, but when it comes time to act he takes a much more positive route. He’s determined to stand up to the Adversary and honour his fallen family without bloodshed. The tension is perfect; I never stopped rooting for him as I watched him navigate each new, insurmountable obstacle. It left me feeling all warm and squishy.And I'm afraid I don't want to say too much more than that, since all my favourite things about this book are spoilerific. Let's just say I highly recommend this. It's another great addition to the series.It is not, however, a good place to start. If you want to jump on the FABLES bandwagon, I recommend that you rustle up a copy of LEGENDS IN EXILE instead.(A slightly different version of this review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • (5/5)
    The story mostly follows Flycatcher who becomes The Good Prince. He follows a quest that takes him back into the lands of the Adversary where he ventures to build his own kingdom with the help of a guide and a series of trapped souls. He has magical armour and sword that help him keep the Adversary and his armies at bay. Plus he seems to be able to absorb the magic of others.Back in Fabletown most of the Fables are watching Flys adventures through the Magic Mirror. There were some small side stories involving Bigby and Snow which I hope is developed in later collections. This was very much Fly's story though all the way through.This was one of my favourite of the collections so far. Fly really came into his own and although he became a Prince again, he stayed true to who he was and did not get power mad like the true Adversary. He was such a background character previously until 1001 Nights of Snowfall (I recommend you read it before this one) where we learn his back story. I hope he continues to figure in later collections despite no longer living in Fabletown.
  • (4/5)
    Volume 10 is all about Flycatcher! It a nice story, but Flycatcher doesn't really do anything ... magic armour comes to him along with a sword, and all he has to do is go through the motions. Where the rest of the volumes shows the character struggling and working towards a goal - things just happen to Flycatcher. Its a weak plot, and a weaker gimmick.Now, interspersed throughout this story, we find that the Fabletown residences are gearing for war - Its a much more interesting story and I wish there was more focus on it instead of Flycatcher.
  • (4/5)
    This one belongs to Flycatcher and it doesn't disappoint. In Fly's rise to becoming King over Haven and the best line of defense between Fabletown and the Imperial Armies, he remains absolutely true to himself. Willingham is able to develop a story that allows Fly to avoid becoming a bloodthirsty warmonger while defeating army after army. It isn't without some cost, but that cost is seeing Bluebeard and Shere Khan banter back and forth and plot, so you know that this is well worth whatever payoff it will bring in future volumes.I should say that Willingham doesn't devote 100% to Fly. He finally lets us in on most of Frau Totenkinder's plan (well, it seems halfway forthcoming). Bufkin and Charming come to an agreement that allows for better working conditions, but let's say this may have as much to do with the Forsworn Knight talking to Bufkin as anything. On the farm, we continue to build the obvious Boy Blue and Rose Red tension (c'mon, already). And the cubs finally learn about their invisible sibling in a comic drawn by Aaron Alexovich that tends to resemble Saturday morning cartoons more than Fables.
  • (5/5)
    In this series, the Fables, people, beings, and creatures that we know from storybooks and fairytales, have made a home in our world, after escaping persecution and death when they fled from their homelands. In this tenth volume of the graphic series, Ambrose, the frog prince and the kind-hearted janitor, goes on a quest back to the homelands to set up his own kingdom. His journey leads him down into the witching well, from which no one has returned, and along a road of many trials. This is probably one of my favorites of the Fables storylines. It's a true heroes tale, along the lines of classic Arthurian romances, such as those featuring Sir Galahad or Sir Gawain of the round table. It's an soothing epic, a perfect calm before the storm that will arrive in then few books to series.
  • (4/5)
    Lancelot comes back and leads Flycatcher on his quest to rescue the dead in the Witching Well and offer them a place at his land within the Homelands, Haven. I like that most of this collection contains one overall story (there are a few shorter stories interspersed too), since it allows Fly to make a probable transition from complete forgetfulness to full awareness of his quest. The Good Prince of the title lives up to his name and is fully rewarded for his fidelity and bravery. I appreciate that Willingham allows his characters (good and bad) to be fully three-dimensional so that they are always surprising. Even the Adversary in all his wickedness can justify his actions somewhat reasonably.
  • (4/5)
    Collecting no less than ten issues (#60-69), this volume proved to be a fascinating read. Centered on one of the characters that up to now was mostly an elevated extra, the Frog Prince takes the lead and proves to be an invaluable player in the upcoming war between the Fables and their arch enemy.

    That doesn't mean there aren't any drawbacks. For one the story races forward so it can be told in approximately 200 pages (there's a short interlude featuring Bigby's kids), and at times it just feels rushed, especially when it is indicated that a lot of time passes in the story. And it seems the art is impacted by this too: Mark Buckingham's drawings seem to be slightly lacking in quality more and more as the story races along.

    Throughout I kept wondering what is happening in Fabletown; we see some glances but these are not very informative and I expect the following volume to present us with the events taking place there during this story arc.
  • (3/5)
    This seems a little rushed.
    On second read, it's still disappointing. I liked Flycatcher very much but I don't get the whole 'this is supposed to happen' motivation for the story. There's no journey, no decision making. He knows what he has to do not because of his own determination but because of some preordained succession of events.
    I still liked it, it had a great premise and a tearjerker buildup (in the volumes preceding this one) but it failed in bringing it together in a satisfying way.
  • (2/5)
    Flycatcher finally steps up and puts on armor.

    Aaron Alexovich's art in "The Birthday Secret" is so extraordinarily bad that the pages he illustrated are almost unreadable.
  • (5/5)
    these just keep getting better as the character and story arcs intertwine. and this one is the most cinematic of the lot, with a very big story of its own that covers a lot of ground. the Frog Prince, Flycatcher, here comes into his own in this parable of war and peace. there's also a nice little play within a play setup, with the citizens of Fabletown as audience watching enthralled as the Frog Prince story unfolds live in the magic mirror. some won't like this whole series, because it's told in the postmodern; but for those who do, this one's a treat.
  • (5/5)
    I'm a biased little fangirl here. Fables AND Arthurian Legends AND The Frog Prince? Yes, sign me up, tie my down, keep it forever. I love, love, loved this storyline. I like how it worked. I like the cost, I like the sacrifices, I like what it was hinting at leading up to eventually.



    (My only later sadness is how we never saw the culmination use of Gretel.)

  • (5/5)
    loved it!!
  • (5/5)
    Reason for Reading: Next in the series.Comments: This is a big issue and I mean that literally and metaphorically. It's a nice, hefty book containing ten issues with nine of those continuing the title story. In the middle there is a one issue intermission that centres on the cubs. The main story, though, without giving anything away, focuses on a minor character who has been around since Vol. 1: Flycatcher, whose real name is Ambrose, and is better known to mundies as the prince who was once turned into a frog. Prince Ambrose takes centre stage and the action switches between him and the resident Fables as he undertakes a very important journey and mission. This book is a turning point in the series. Things will not be the same from the point forward. This was a fabulous issue! I loved it and am more eager than usual (if that is possible) to get my hands on the next volume.