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100 Bullets, Band 3 - Alle guten Dinge

100 Bullets, Band 3 - Alle guten Dinge

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100 Bullets, Band 3 - Alle guten Dinge

Bewertungen:
3/5 (139 Bewertungen)
Länge:
128 Seiten
29 Minuten
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783736710580
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Das Leben ist mies. und dann stirbt man. Oder zumindest stirbt irgendjemand. Und wenn man die finstere Welt von 100 BULLETS betritt, stirbt wahrscheinlich gleich eine ganze Reihe von Leuten. Genau diese Erfahrung macht ein junger Mann namens Loop. Denn er bekommt von Agent Graves eine Kanone und 100 Kugeln, die man nicht zurückverfolgen kann, um mit dem Vater abzurechnen, den er nie kannte. Und um einen Blick in die Unterwelt zu werfen, die er sich so in seinen schlimmsten Träumen nicht vorgestellt hätte.
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783736710580
Format:
Buch

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100 Bullets, Band 3 - Alle guten Dinge - Brian Azzarello

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3.0
139 Bewertungen / 5 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    Although I had enjoyed the first two trades of 100 Bullets, I'd been unsure if I'd continue reading the series. I picked up this trade on a whim, and I'm glad that I did. Altogether, I think that this is my favorite story arc of 100 Bullets so far. In this trade, a young man (Loop) is given the gun with untraceable bullets and all of the information he needs to find his deadbeat father, whose absence has severely affected Loop's life. Of course, nothing is as straightforward as it seems, and the story takes several twists and turns. And the artwork, as always, is great and fluid. This trade is what sold me on continuing with the series.
  • (5/5)
    This is the one volume of the series that doesn't have a number-related pun in the title, which annoys me deeply on some meaningless level. But the award-winning story is very good. I think what I like best about it is how subtly unexpected it is, specifically in regards to its portrayal of race. It would have been easy to present Loop as the stereotypical gangbanger, but he's actually a surprisingly thoughtful kid, who completely transcends that image. And I especially liked that he and his father eventually and truly bonded over baseball. It's an idea so traditional that you barely notice it, but after all the crime and violence, it's quite unusual to have such a Norman Rockwell moment.
  • (3/5)
    The more I read the series, the more I want to know how it will continue to evolve.
  • (4/5)
    (Series review) I stuck with this series for four trade paperbacks. There's no doubting the aesthetic quality of the series: tightly written stories of crime and violence, with a distinctive and appropriate artistic style to match the mood and pacing of the writing. In some ways, it's like a smarter, more ambitious version of the mood behind the Grand Theft Auto games. The central thematic hook introduced in the first trade paperback is this: if you were given a gun and the consequences of its use could under no circumstances be traced back to you by the authorities, what would you do with it? It didn't take long for the series to go beyond that trick premise and develop its own complicated backstory and mythology. In the end, strictly for reasons of personal preference, I don't rate the series highly: the setting and mood are just too consistently ugly and gritty for my tastes. But if you like true crime stories, or the meaner end of the thriller genre, you might well enjoy this series.
  • (3/5)
    The third installment of 100 Bullets takes a slight step backwards from its predecessors, mostly because this "Hang Up on the Hang Low" chapter does little to advance the overall story. It's not particularly bad, but feels like a somewhat unnecessary diversion from the larger narrative that had begun to gain significant ground in volume 2. But of course there is still Eduardo Risso's stunning artwork - if not for that, there would be no real reason to bother with this volume, but since there IS that, it's still a worthwhile read.