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Fables, Band 10 - Väter und Söhne

Fables, Band 10 - Väter und Söhne

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Fables, Band 10 - Väter und Söhne

Bewertungen:
4/5 (20 Bewertungen)
Länge:
201 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783957836304
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

KRIEGSGELÜSTE UND GENERATIONENKONFLIKTE Nachdem nun bekannt ist, wie der Feind im Heimatland aussieht – und vor allem, dass es sich um einen der Ihren handelt: den Holzschnitzer Geppetto –, ist sein Sohn Pinocchio hin und her gerissen zwischen der Liebe zu seinem Vater und der Loyalität zu seinen Freunden in Fabletown. Für wen wird er sich entscheiden? Außerdem begleiten wir Bigby Wolf und seine Familie auf der Suche nach seinem Vater, dem Nordwind, um sich mit ihm zu versöhnen – und Hänsel, der Hexenjäger, wird als Botschafter nach New York entsandt. Auch im neuen Fables-Band gelingt es Bill Willingham und Mark Buckingham, den Leser zu fesseln und zu verzaubern. FABLES – ausgezeichnet in SAN DIEGO 2009 mit dem EISNER AWARD als "Beste Comic-Serie"!
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783957836304
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Bill Willingham is the critically-acclaimed, award-winning creator of several iconic comic book series, including the bestselling Fables franchise. In 2003, its first year of publication, Fables won the prestigious Eisner award for Best New Series, and has gone on to win fourteen Eisners to date. Bill lives in the wild and frosty woods of Minnesota.


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4.1
20 Bewertungen / 20 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    This is a bit more like it, and for the first time, I appear to be reading the series I was expecting from Fables: there's a big council of villains in this volume, and - naturally - they come from different books and legends. (Special points for including L. Frank Baum's Nome King.) The Snow Queen's plan to destroy the Fables is remarkably OTT, but it is entertaining. Unfortunately, the second storyline, involving Bigby, Snow White, and their children visiting the North Wind, is hampered by weak art. However, in terms of writing, it's probably Willingham's strongest attempt at interpersonal relationships so far.
  • (5/5)
    Another amazing installment. After Bigby's blow to the Adversary, things go momentarily quiet. But really it's just the calm before the storm. Will this be all out war? Fabletown has been playing it smart but was Bigby's attack going too far? I also enjoyed the little side story about Snow White, Bigby, and the kids going back to the homelands to visit Bigby's estranged father as well as the short vignette's about reader's questions. Great fun!
  • (4/5)
    While the Empire plots against Fabletown and Fabletown spies on Ambassador Hansel who the Empire has sent to negotiate, the reader is treated to a number of different and varied stories that let us get to know some more residents of Fabletown. We spent Christmas with Snow White, Bigby Wolf and the Cubs and learn more about Bigby Wolf’s family. Also, we learn that Flycatcher (Prince Ambrose) will have an important role to play in the future.A series of one questions by fans is answered by one page mini-stories at the end of the book and the enjoyment here is learning more about the characters and their background, lots of humor here. I enjoyed this volume a lot.
  • (4/5)
    this one's all scattered, with little stories all over the place. but it still manages to advance the politics dramatically, contrast Geppetto's army of sons with Bigby and Snow's cub family, introduce a bunch of new characters (including the Snow Queen, yay!, and Santa Claus), highlight a bunch of minor characters as they are changing, make space for a whole bunch of guest illustrators (Jill Thompson for one) and in its spare time meditate further in the show & tell on those outmoded old-skool evil vs good distinctions. hey, it's complicated. my new favorite character: Cindy but the Flycatcher also gets some quality time..
  • (5/5)
    A scary look at what is to come in the war between the fables and the adversary. We check in with Bigby, Snow, and the cubs while they romp at the farm and visit the homelands. We also watch Gepetto have a summit with all the baddies he can bring together. I am really eager to see what Willingham will do with this series.
  • (4/5)
    Fun times, although I question the flat middle-Americanness of the speech patterns in the Homelands. Like, you could have painted her dialogue by numbers and still made the Ice Queen way creepy. I mean, too much cheap realism is just dickish, here, Bill: we've got the "these aren't your mommy's fairytales" bit and in the end, c'mon, we're all reading for wonder. But the Nome King gives a delighted-scared childlike frisson, and I don't know why so into the Rus mythos except that it's cool, but I don't mind (but c'mon! Who's ruling Ys and Jotunheim?!). And Bigby and the North Wind - again, way too psychological-realistic. I really think their relations need to balance on that knife-edge between "deadbeat dad" and "Olympian gods" - hard to do, but think of Magneto, Wanda and Pietro. Awesome, awesome bit with Pinoccio and the invasion plans, though. And I am intrigued by Flycatcher's li'l storyline and like the idea of Blue and Rose, and overall the joys of this comic are becoming more soapy but they are still joys. This was kind of a between-arcs trade anyway, so it'll go down in "fleshing out this classic fantasy world" and be worthier, perhaps, than it is entertaining. But I sound too snotty critical. This book was perfectly fine. It's only by the series' high standards, cliche cliche, that it falls short.Oh, and I liked the Allred art and the Christmas bit. In some ways I'm churlish not to give this a 4, but it just didn't add up to anything for me.
  • (4/5)
    Somehow, Willingham's FABLES universe just gets better as it grows. More and more characters are being added with each new volume, and yet the story never gets too big for him to handle.As always, I'm anxious to see each storyline play out, but not at the expense of the others. And now Willingham is adding a couple more stories that are just as interesting. Like good jazz (and real life), these tales never resolve, but just move through episodes. Wonderful!
  • (4/5)
    Sons of Empire foreshadows (via the unfolding of Adversarial machinations) much nastiness to come, while opening a window on the present peace in Fabletown and romance and domestic bliss on the Farm and in Wolf Valley.
  • (5/5)
    Sons of Empire is the Latest collection if the Fables series. It is a motley collection of a couple of longer stories and a lot of small, couple pages long clips showing us the lives of people and Fables in and around Fabletown.It is these short stories that truly shine here. We get a glimpse of Rapunzel's life between her thrice-daily haircuts. We see a mundy silently perceiving the lives of the Fables from afar. We laugh about the love-life of a porcupine, and the best of all, we get to follow the irrational, but always optimistic three blind mice as they search for their promised land with exotic mouse maidens. Willingham treats us with these stories that seem unimportant at first, but may yet become more important in the future... :)The main stories are about the Adversary's forces scheming the end of Fabletown, and describing different possible outcomes for an attack. These plans again show us how the Fable ideas work together with the modern world, previously best shown in the Battle of Fabletown.The other longer story tells us how the Wolf family goes to see Bigby's father for Christmas. It tells us a little about Bigby's and his father's difficult relations, but the tale also has more in store than mere family bickering...The book is nicely rounded up by Willingham answering in comic form some of the reader questions that have been piling up through the years. Tell me, haven't you ever wondered just what IS Frau Totenkinder knitting..?
  • (5/5)
    Reason for Reading: Next in the series.Summary: Starts of with four issues of the title story where the Adversary has a meeting to describe possible attacks on the Mundy world. Switches are made to Fabletown and the Farm where new plotlines are forming. Each issue ends with a short 3-4 page story of someone outside of Fabletown that we either have never met before or don't know much of. Then we have a Christmas Issue spent on the Farm and with the Wolf family, this starts with a quick flashback to 1956, where we see enjoy a scene with our long banished Fableton, Jack. Then onto a two issue story where Bigby and family go visit his father. The story is called "Father and Son" and has meaning in several different ways than the obvious one. And finally the book ends with a fun issue called "Burning Questions" where short stories are presented to answer readers questions about things that have never been explained so far, such as " What is Frau Totenkinder knitting?"Comments: This is a great volume. Nice and thick with lots of action and forward motion of the plotline as well as some plain fun. All sorts of new characters are introduced on the Homelands side, some of whom are obviously going to be big players from now on. Also throughout this whole volume a lot of familiar faces show up, some we haven't seen for a long time. I'm left with a feeling that something new is about to happen in the next volume and am quite eager to continue on. I can't believe I'm getting so close to catching up with this series!
  • (5/5)
    This is the ninth installment in the Fables series. This one progresses the story of the Adversary some, but also spends time with Bigby, Snow and their family. It was a good installment in the series and I enjoyed it.The first couple issues go over the Adversary and their plans to attack the Fables after the devastation Bigby caused to their Sacred Grove. The remainder deals with Bigby, Snow and their kids. We see Christmas at their house and Bigby et al finally find his father the North Wind and visit him. This is about the sons (Pinocchio and Bigby) trying to reconcile and deal with their fathers.This was a fun addition to the series. It doesn’t progress the overall story much; we just get to see some war planning on the Adversary’s end. We do get to see a lot more of Bigby, Snow, and kids. This was entertaining and nice interlude amongst all the heavy war talk. In general the drawing is similar to previous issues, with the exception being one issue with Bigby in it that is drawn in a very sketchy way. It was okay, but I didn’t enjoy it as much as the other illustrations.There is also a funny section in the back of the book where Willingham answers questions from the readers. I enjoyed this.Overall this is another solid installment in the Fables series. I liked that the main story was progressed some. I also enjoyed learning more about Bigby and the North Wind and their relationship. Highly recommended to those who enjoy fairy tale retellings and/or urban fantasy.
  • (4/5)
    Still deeply in love with series. The pieces get better and better with each section. I love how morality and loyalty is turned on several sides and poked at in this storyline.
  • (4/5)
    4/5

    I liked this volume. Not as action-packed as the previous few but I loved the build up of the empire's plans for our world. Is it bad that frequently when I read evil plans to destroy our world I get really excited about them?
  • (4/5)
    This volume wasn't as good as the last, but I'm always a sucker when it comes to stories about the cubs. In this one, we get the schemes of the adversaries, Bigby and family Christmas Adventure. I'm also not as happy with drawing in this one- they seems to sketchy and not very definitive. I also don't like the way the kids in the story seem to be a different age with each artist - its rather distracting.
  • (4/5)
    In this volume, we have a bit of everything. The bulk of the story is split between plans for war and defense - both from the Adversary and Fabletown - and along the looser theme of fathers and sons. The latter storyline brings the promise of plenty of cub storyline, but also more insight into the Northwind and Bigby, Geppetto and Pinocchio, and even some insight into Charming and his father. The plans for war are rather thorough in their destructive nature, but thankfully Willingham breaks up much of the gravity of the plan with cute interludes that both charm and offer insight in the past of the Homelands. This is not to say that the storyline of the war plans get off track - even Charming has a chance to look nearly competent in his position as leader in this volume.As to the downside, the multiple artist approach makes an already hodge-podgy volume feel even more disjointed. Michael Allred's work on Father and Son takes a severe departure in style. While this particular story is written from the future in a flash-back style from Ambrose's perspective, the muddled and half-done look makes sense (and probably wasn't noticed in a one-shot), but in the graphic collection, it just feels left out. Worse yet, the story veers away from Ambrose's perspective and into omipresent-view and back to Ambrose's perspective - which means either events out of Ambrose's view were told to him years later or (more likely), we were subject to minor bit of lazy storytelling to support artwork.Still, a volume you can't miss if you want to know where everything is heading.
  • (4/5)
    The Adversary and his collaborators gather to discuss ideas of how to invade Fabletown, witch-hunter Hansel is sent to Fabletown as the Emperor's "envoy" to find and release prisoners, Christmas comes to the farm, and the cubs get a fright when their father's brothers show their colors. Great installment in the series - the politics of the "baddies" is very interesting and adds gravitas to the overall storyarc. Also, one of my favorite stories, "Father and Son," is contained in this collection - both story and art is absolutely brilliant.
  • (3/5)
    The Snow Queen still freaks me out a little bit.
  • (4/5)
    "Fables" can be hit and miss, and looking at the table of contents this looked to be one for the second category. Thankfully, I was mistaken.

    The four-part "Sons Of Empire" Arc is basically a clever way to depict two massive battles, without there being actual consequences. Along the way more mythical characters are introduced (none of them frivolously), and in between the parts/chapters we get short slices of life from other Fables which lighten the mood.

    You might be tempted to skip the Christmas tale, but it is quite amusing -- and on top of that it is part of the ongoing storyline. We then learn more about Bigby Wolf's father in the two-parter "Father And Son", and the book ends with a collection of short (one/two-page) illustrated answers to several readers' questions.

    Yes, the story is fragmented, and clearly this volume spends more time talking about possible scenarios and setting up future plots, but in this volume it works. One minus point however is the artwork for "Father And Son" which is quite frankly below par.
  • (4/5)
    As the plot thickens, it left me wanting to get on to the next volume!
  • (2/5)
    The Adversary calls together the leaders of the Empire to decide what to do to Fabletown. The Snow Queen proposes killing all the mundies to leave the escaped Fables defenseless, but Pinnochio points out that the mundies have technology that might overpower the Empire's magic. To buy time, the Adversary sends WitchFinder Hansel to Fabletown to negotiate a treaty.

    There are far too many mini-stories in this book. Reading a long section about Santa Claus, or what a lethario Jack is, is cute, but detracts from the building danger. To make matters worse, the art direction has begun to fall apart. The story of "Father and Son" is poor, but the art is even worse. I don't expect art to be consistently as excellent as "Porky Pine Pie", but it would be nice if the characters looked like themselves.