Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

V wie Vendetta

V wie Vendetta

Vorschau lesen

V wie Vendetta

Bewertungen:
4/5 (2,692 Bewertungen)
Länge:
285 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736712478
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

DAS KOMPLETTE MEISTERWERK VON ALAN MOORE UND DAVID LLOYD! In V FOR VENDETTA schildern Alan Moore und David Lloyd auf über 280 Seiten ein faschistisches England, in dem sich einige Jahre nach einem atomaren Krieg ein totalitäres Regime etabliert hat. Als die junge Evey von mehreren Männern vergewaltigt wird, rettet der geheimnisvolle maskierte V sie und bringt sie in sein Versteck im Untergrund. Von dort steuert er seine gezielten terroristischen Aktionen, mit denen er dem System Sand ins Getriebe streut. Als V zwei Sehenswürdigkeiten sprengt und die Radiostation unter seine Kontrolle bringt, geht sein Plan von einer Revolution auf. Gleichzeitig entdeckt Evey seinen Hintergrund und erkennt, welche Rolle sie in Vs Plänen spielt.
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736712478
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Alan Moore is the creator of the graphic novels Lost Girls, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and From Hell. His other work includes the novels Voice of the Fire and Jerusalem, and (with Mitch Jenkins) the short film series The Show.


Ähnlich wie V wie Vendetta

Ähnliche Bücher

Buchvorschau

V wie Vendetta - Alan Moore

Sie haben das Ende dieser Vorschau erreicht. Registrieren Sie sich, um mehr zu lesen!
Seite 1 von 1

Rezensionen

Was die anderen über V wie Vendetta denken

4.0
2692 Bewertungen / 90 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    The first graphic novel I've read, so I can't really compare it with anything else. For what it's worth, though, I very much enjoyed the plot (i.e. Alan Moore's words), but found David Lloyd's illustrations rather confusing in places (I found it hard to distinguish between some of the characters). It's perhaps not quite as 'deep' as it thinks it is, but it raises some very interesting themes and points, and the story is skillfully told.And, whatever Alan Moore might think, the film's very good, too.
  • (4/5)
    No need to really discuss the art of Alan Moore and David Lloyd. The story is incredibly well done, and reviewed and discussed in many other locations. The only addition I would make is that the quality of this edition is a bit light, and in some of the later panels, the selected colors make it difficult to see details. The overall quality is very high.
  • (4/5)
    I'd seen the movie and liked it. I'd read other Alan Moore graphic novels and liked them. I'd seen Moore's commentaries on how much he hates every movie ever made from one of his books, especially this one. And I thought I should check it out for myself.I can see why he's upset. The plot is similar, and the point is similar, but the book and the movie go about it VERY differently and the actual endings are quite different. In fact, the movie chose to end with what is pretty much the beginning of the book.Like most, if not all, of Moore's books, V is about how and why the central characters are they way they are. And they aren't necessarily good people. V is a tortured anarchist who kidnaps and tortures a relative innocent to turn them into a copy of himself. Along the way he fights against a corrupt autocracy. But not because it is a good thing, or a noble thing, but for personal revenge and because V is an anarchist. A violent anarchist.I like that aspect. This is the perfect example of "comics aren't just happy stories for kids", just in case anyone still believes that old trope. The story, themes, dialog are all something you can find in contemporary social commentary fiction. Except better than at least 80% of what you're likely to find. The images are incredibly well done by David Lloyd. The art is nothing of the flashy lurid colors you might associate with a "comic book". The pallet is very restrained, monochromatic even. Most of the book is illustrated in sepia, washed-out blues, or faded amber/rose with occasional splashes of green intruding into a section. It is dark, much like the material. Shadows predominate.Ultimately it is a powerful story, powerfully told and powerfully illustrated and it has little to do with the movie. I disagree with Moore about the movie. I think that was pretty good too, but he's right that it wasn't a movie of his book.
  • (3/5)
    Curiousity was the reason I read this book, because I found myself enjoying the film version. I now find myself in the position of saying I'm glad the book was written because otherwise the film would not have been made. I found the written story far more disjointed, harder to focus on (partially because it was written for the 1980's, not the 2000's political climate), and generally unappealing. It is a classic of its genre, however, and worth at least one read if you are a fan.
  • (4/5)
    Nuclear war has changed the world. Continents are gone. The UK has become a fascist state. Few are willing to speak out against the injustices the government perpetrates every day. Then one man--codename V--begins to do just that.The more Alan Moore I read, the more I like his work. His stories are consistently thought-provoking, intricate, subtle and dark. He doesn't give answers; instead, he tosses out a bunch of ideas and lets the reader figure out how she feels about them. It's interactive. You can't just kick back and enjoy the story; you really need to concentrate on what's going on, because Moore sure as hell isn't gonna tell you in so many words.V FOR VENDETTA is no exception. It's an early piece and so is not, perhaps, quite so subtle as some of Moore's later stuff, but it doesn't suffer by comparison. It's deep and penetrating and absolutely worth your time. As David Lloyd says in the introduction, this is a book for people who don't switch off the news. It's for readers who want to look deeper. There are no good guys here, and you could argue that there are no bad guys, either. There are people; people who've chosen, or been forced into, particular paths, and must now deal with the consequences. Moore and Lloyd rarely pass judgment on them as they chronicle their story (though they do invite us to do so). They show us what these people do and how they feel about what they do. They invite us to place ourselves in the same situations and consider how our views might change. What is right? What is wrong? Where should we draw the line?So V FOR VENDETTA is a highly political work, but it's also a book about symbols. V, the (arguably) central character, dresses as Guy Fawkes. He wears an ever-smiling theatrical mask. He collects pieces of the contraband past. He throws snippets of plays and songs in his opponents' faces. Even his codename, V, is symbolic: of what he (wants his enemies to believe he) endured after the fascists came to power; of the old slogan, "V For Victory,"; of the V sign, which I understand is basically the finger to British folks. Moore also makes it clear that V is for a lot of things, not just Vendettas and Victory: victims, vermin, villains, voices, visions, violence, vengeance, and a whole host of other things positive, negative and in between.And then there's the format itself, which was revolutionary for the times. There are no thought bubbles, no block quotes from an omniscient narrator. The story relies entirely on the art and the dialogue, and the two together do an admirable job of pushing everything along. Lloyd's paneling is dynamic and easy to follow. His use of line ties the work firmly to the 1980's, but after a while you won't even notice. His colours, in contrast, are pretty different from the stuff that was prevalent back in the 80's. At times, V FOR VENDETTA looks like nothing so much as a watercolour painting.There's a ton to think about here, a ton to mull over and contemplate. I feel like I'm not saying enough; like I haven't even scratched the surface. There's a lot to this book. I highly recommend that you check it out for yourself.(A slightly different version of this review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • (4/5)
    I really didn't intend on reading this. However, seeing a clip from the movie (Valerie's letter) in my oral history class led me to watch the entire movie with my roommate, who had read the graphic novel. Since I enjoyed the movie so much, I decided that I'd better read the original as well. Obviously, some things are always changed when making a movie from a book, but I liked both renditions very much.I'm a huge fan of dystopian fiction, so V for Vendetta fits right in with my tastes, especially with some of its emphasis on religious and sexual "deviants." Norsefire, an extreme fascist party, currently rules England. One focus of the novel is a young woman named Evey Hammond and her complicated relationship with a man who only goes by "V." An anarchist and a terrorist, he has become an noticeable threat to the current regime. While it is never revealed exactly who V is, his story is hinted at, and really, that's all that is necessary.It took me a very long time to really appreciate the way the artwork was colored. Instead of the typical comic, with very distinct patches of color separated by distinct black lines, the coloring style used in V for Vendetta reminded me more of a water-color drawing.In addition to the original ten issues that make up the series, the trade paperback collection also includes an article written by Alan Moore (published partway through the series it is about the creation and development of the series) and two related short comics that fall outside of the main story.Initially intended as a commentary on the political situation in Britain in the 1980s, I find it extraordinarily applicable to the political situation in the United States in the 2000s. Perhaps even frighteningly so. Although it certainly has its issues, V for Vendetta is an important landmark for comics as a genre and I'm glad I took the time to read it.Experiments in Reading
  • (5/5)
    i couldn't possibly review this because it changed how i thought about life and writing and myself and the world, ad nauseum.
  • (4/5)
    The drawing style was dark but kind of fusty. The story, however, was deliciously complex and well-written, as well as relevant.
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant! I will never mark it down, even though it became a movie and didn't follow it's story very much. The movie was amazing, too!
  • (5/5)
    The most interesting thing about “V for Vendetta” is that the main theme of the novel isn't actually one man standing up to Fascism, though that's an aspect of it. The more relevant political theme is Anarchism, though it's still only partly about that. The primary themes are about people; about people taking their freedom and the responsibility that goes along with it. The creeping Fascism of the book came not from the scheming of an elite, but from the failure of the countrymen to take control of their own lives, and instead taking the simple way out and following the group that promised to take away their fear.The freedom of “The Land of Do As You Please” isn't the answer, but rather than the opposite of authoritarian ideas of responsibility they're one and the same, both accepting the easy answer rather than standing up and actively choosing. Moore and Lloyd's Anarchism is a freedom of self-rule, where you take real responsibility for governing your own actions among your peers and hold your ideals in a way that can't be threatened. On a personal level, this a case made well; even Finch, who isn't pushed through this like Evey but goes through a (potentially absurd) revelation is better than Mrs. Heyer's ultimate dependency. The authors skimp, however, on the possible rise of this unruled order – the novel takes place under the old order. It's rather clear they would pin the blame on the people, and not the system, if it didn't work.Moore is certainly verbose; there's a lot of talking here and most of the fights are abrupt matters. Lloyd's art isn't outstanding or beautiful (though the faded color may due to the printing), but it's never a problem and the lighting, shade, and color augments the action. The minimal use of internal monologue, and complete lack of sound effects or thought bubbles means it has to pull it's own weight and it does. V for Vendetta is a great graphic novel – as much or more for it's warnings of letting us fall prey to our fears and appetites in a subtle way as for the overt threat of Fascism.
  • (4/5)
    Another brilliant work from Alan Moore. Excellent writing, fascinating story, and excellent art work.
  • (5/5)
    One of those books I wish I'd read before the film, although it's hard not to compare either way. The book has a much different ending than the film in terms of showing V as an idea and a concept. (I liked the film ending, but I like how the book ends better.)
  • (3/5)
    I think I expected too much from V for Vendetta and as a result, I found the book disappointing. The V character was, to me at least, kind of stupid, listening to Motown and wearing that stupid Guy Fawkes mask and putting Evey through incredible psychological torture to "liberate" her. I guess the author was trying for a certain level of moral ambivalence in the character, but his vision of anarchy left me frankly flat.Maybe I need to reread the book to pick on its nuances, or maybe I'm just not cut out to appreciate the whole superhero genre or whatever genre this book falls under.
  • (5/5)
    This was a very dark graphic novel, yet I feel that it would not have succeeded otherwise. Alan Moore's strength in this one is to create characters so morally complex as to make the reader wonder who it is to "cheer" for and whom to "despise" I put those words in quotes because here, unlike the current literary trend of presenting strong anti-heroes, V is for Vendetta sets its sight on promoting an anti-villain and his violent methods. Taking that perspective forces us readers to think and process throughout the course of reading this graphic novel. Something so many other works of fiction fail to do.
  • (5/5)
    There is a lot to say about this book. Par for the course with Mr. Moore, really, but, like, a lot even for him. More than LoEG, even. Or not more, but more important things.How did you predict the future so hard? I mean, not the details - one of the peculiarities of future-racist dystopias is that they always have thinly veiled British Mosley Nazis like it's the '30s or something, which is obvs ridic. Nobody will go for that now, not in post-imperial Britain - leave it for the continentals or the wackos, the rest of the country will take their other-hatred in the name of "security" or fighting "terrorism," thank you very much. And the Christ-y stuff is so halfhearted that I can only assume it's an attempt to make godless Brits shudder than an actual stab at prognostication. But all the rest - "Fate" and the surveillance mechanisms are the missing link between 1984 and CCTV; the squawking prolegramming fills the gap between 1985 and Little Britain; that indelible, shocking scene with Evey and the fingermen at the beginning fits neatly in between "Hallowe'en Jack is a real cool cat" and ASBOs or hoodie bans. England has been blessed with a lot of Cassandras, but this is one dark future that seems a lot less averted than most. Maybe because it's comics?(And yeah, it's breastier and more histrionic and LSD is more involved that it could be, and it's definitely the work of young men who think V is super badass, but they're not wrong, when you come right down to it.)
  • (5/5)
    This is the best graphic novel I've ever read.
  • (4/5)
    My second foray into the strange new world of graphic novels was another rewarding experience. There were some things in the story I didn't find adequately explained and that nagged at me, but overall an exciting, terrifying story with compelling characters and interesting art to go along with it.
  • (3/5)
    A lot of the background to this novel doesn't really make any sense. How did V get enough money for all the supplies he needed? How did he get access to vital locations if everything is being watched? For that matter, how did he kill so many people without any one even thinking they had a serial killer on their hands? How did he plant explosives in all the major buildings, especially after Parliament went kablooie? How is there a computer that knows everything, given the collapse of the high-tech sector? How did V gain access to it years ago?Magic, I suppose, like the hormone magic required for him to become the super hero that he is.Politically, I suppose that chaos is better than fascism, and the feudalism you see beginning to crop up at the end is also better. But then, so what? What does this book have to say to us? The answer could be: question authority. Alright, but the novel asks its questions with explosions and murder. V tortures an innocent girl, and we are supposed to believe he is liberating her instead of causing PTSD. The brave new world of individuals thinking for themselves, to be ushered in at the end, doesn't offer much in the way of hope or reason.The book is full of the easy part of anarchy: Smash! The hard part - building a society of equals, with no government, one that is prosperous and safe - this is no where in evidence in the book. At most, it can be found in the occasional aphorism or song lyric, or delivered sermon-like by V. (It almost reminds me of Ayn Rand, ha).As for the art, at times it's really good. But as has been frequently noted, the background characters are usually rather difficult to tell apart, and it sometimes is really hard to tell what's actually happening, to whom. The fact that often I didn't care enough to really work it out speaks to how unimportant these background characters actually are. And the novel's treatment of women, well, I won't say it's misogynistic. Mostly because I'm tired. And the novel's treatment of sex, which is rather shabby, probably dovetails with the treatment of women. A lot could be written about this, but not here by me:)So, why 3 stars? I did find it compelling. For all its flaws, there is some wonderful material here. The art did draw me in rather frequently, and I read it all in one sitting, taking my time over 4 hours to really soak it in. It far from sucks, that I can say. But it is also a world away from being great, and is only just barely on the side of good. It does its job of creating dialogue. And it's heavily iconic, my copy came with a Guy Fawkes mask.
  • (5/5)
    I'm a little ashamed to admit that this was my first graphic novel. Sure, I grew up reading comic books, but the Archies were so much different than this. I can't imagine the work that went into this, first of all. Writing a novel is one thing, but illustrating it all? Wow.

    Not even sure what to write about this one. I give it five stars not just for the writing, which I thought was brilliant at times, but for its impact on popular culture and political activism, i.e., the Occupy Movement's adopting of the Guy Fawkes masks and many references to the character V.

    The movie V for Vendetta was very good. I'd seen it beforehand, and it was interesting to see all of the differences between the film and the graphic novel--there were quite a few.

    V for Vendetta is set in a dystopian future London with a totalitarian government. The main character V is an anarchist whose main goal is to finish off what Guy Fawkes had originally planned, and that is to blow up Parliament--not so much to cause destruction of the place, but because the place represents an idea of government. Blowing it up will, in essence, cause a re-set, which in V's mind is the only way society has a chance if it wants to live freely and openly.

    Alan Moore was unhappy with the status quo when he wrote V for Vendetta. He saw the government in England at the time as overstepping its authority and intruding on the lives of its citizens. His novel creates an extreme world where the government is all-seeing, intrusive, and really up to no good, responsible for genocide of "undesirables," using citizens as experimental guinea pigs, and other horrible things.

    The faceless character V lives by his own strict ethical and moral code. By wearing the mask, he is everyman/woman. His underlying message is that the people have the power to bring about the change they seek, especially when their government is behaving badly.

    This graphic novel brings up many philosophical questions, and after reading it, I can understand why it became so popular. My only criticism has to do with the drawings being muddy (dark colors) and sometimes it was hard for me to distinguish between the characters. Moore doesn't spell everything out for the reader. When I mentioned that I was a little confused to my teen son, he said, "You have to pay close attention while reading." Good advice. (I should listen to my son more often.)

    I don't know if "enjoyed" is the right term to describe how I felt about this with the subject matter being so dark, but I definitely found it to be a page turner. The end was so much different than the movie's which ties things up neatly (but that's Hollywood for you).

    Great first experience with a graphic novel. Next for me is Moore's Watchmen.

  • (4/5)
    Another instance of me liking the movie better (though that doesn't happen often). It's good for what it is, bu the movie definitely improved on the source material.
  • (1/5)
    This is supposedly a great political graphic novel with V a great revolutionary character. The only thing I can say is true is that it is a political graphic novel. Overall it sucked. V was more into personal vengeance than anything else, the graphics were pretty poor and not the easiest to follow and the writing just seemed clunky and more used to force somebody's ideas down your throat.
  • (4/5)
    V for Vendetta is a very accurate and often graphic portrayal of what a messed-up society would look like if communism did come true and all citizens were crushed under the thumb of 'justice'. The Guy Fawkes mask serves as a powerful symbol of rebellion, crazed anarchy and the destruction of law and order. Although the actual man Guy Fawkes was someone who did such things and came to a tragic end, he served as martyr of the revolution and his legacy carried on. His mocking face is taken up today by the hacktivist group Anonymous among others including the character V and the music video "Toulouse". The utter obliteration of identity is exactly what happens and meant to happen all along in V for Vendetta. We never find out who V actually was. All we know is that he's a man.
    Alan Moore incorporates a lot of themes on war, love, and corruption into the novel. He extracted many elements from artists (Ernst's Europe after the Rains), F'451, Nightraven, writers like Huxley and Orwell, other lesser known people, literature, Robin Hood, Turpin, and events like WWII. I loved the various Shakespeare and other author references. At one point, I even saw Cosette from Les Miserables. It all contributed to the shady atmosphere that persisted and continued to get darker throughout the whole book. Everyone's lives were bleak and often terrifyingly depressing but they were never insignificant since it contributed to the general plot of the book. Each person played a relevant role in the general storyline. This was such a dampening story that shows the malevolent side of human nature but it was something that should be read. There is good in humanity but people can do such terrible things and most of the time, both of them exist in the same humans. V was not a hero nor even close to a good person through any viewpoint. And I don't think anyone who impersonates V will be.
  • (3/5)
    My reaction to the graphic novel in conjunction with my reaction to the movie. I couldn't manage to separate them out properly.1. Calling V for Vendetta a graphic novel implies a continuity, a cohesion of themes, characterization, and events that simply isn't present in this work.1a. The above does not make the work less gripping, worthwhile, or well done.2. I don't like Evie, or what she represents, in the collection. I do like her in the movie.2a. This has more to do with characterization continuity than anything else.3. Dysfunction concerning the idea of sex, and how this is a symptom/sign of other, seemingly more relevant issues in a society is treated as it should be. A dysfunction with sex in the collection is a sign that there are deep moral and ethical dysfunctions within a character.3a. This isn't nearly as smarmy as it could have been if shock value were the only value that sex added to the story.3b. It's still smarmy.4. The movie is what happens when one has a good adaptation. No creator is perfect, so another edit or twisting around so that things are more connected and fit better isn't necessarily a bad thing. The foundation, structure, and flavor of everything are already present though, or it would be a retelling rather than an adaptation.5. V is a fabulous protagonist, and his story is very, very much worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    Good, but Moore hasn't quite yet gotten a grasp on making his pretensiouness seem fully earned. Start with Watchmen.
  • (3/5)
    I had to read this after seeing the movie. The idea behind the smiling Guy Fawkes mask clearly symbolizes the punk/anarchist scene of 1980s London. While I found the movie more eloquent and colorful, the graphic novel added so much more to the idea of V. If you liked the movie, you should read this book.
  • (4/5)
    Guilty admission first: I waited to read the comic book until I saw the movie. I can enjoy a book very much after seeing a movie, but if I read a book and then see the movie, I spend too much movie-viewing time saying “That’s not how it was!” So, knowing that there was a movie coming, I held off. Thus I was able to view the two different versions philosophically, with the added bonus of hearing V’s dialog in the inimitable voice of Hugo Weaving. That said, the differences were not distracting. It became clear that the creators of the film hewed very closely to the tone and spirit of the graphic novel, merely changing emphasis to better address the concerns of the post-9/11 era (and of course dropping plotlines to encompass the time-concerns of a blockbuster movie). Considering that the novel was finished in 1988, it is amazing to see how little had to be changed to update it. The basic plot still involves V, a terrorist, engaging in an epic vendetta against government figures and the government itself for abuses perpetrated on him in the past. In the course of it he picks up the fragile girl Evey Hammond. He at various times saves her, uses her, nurtures her and abuses her. To say it is an ambiguous relationship would be to drastically understate it. David Lloyd’s artwork was very effective. As mentioned in an essay at the end, the pair decided to tell the story with no sound effects and no thought-bubbles. I didn’t notice their absence at all until it was pointed out. The action was rarely unclear. That said, the palette was sort of bland, lots of beige and washed-out colors. While that was almost certainly deliberate, it doesn’t necessarily keep the eye engaged over 300 pages. Politically, there is a lot to argue with in this book. It is an unambiguous statement in favor of anarchy. While anarchy may be preferred to fascism, it’s unclear if it should be preferred to a flawed democracy. And like all books of its type, it stops right before the hard part: throwing down a government is always easier than building something new and lasting.
  • (5/5)
    Imagine that we are living in fear of muslims, gays, and other cultural "devients" and the central government is clamping down to make sure the people are "safe." (Hmmm rings a bell...) And one person rises up and challenges the system; I dont like his anarchist leanings, but I admire his heroism. He can be cruel (imprisoning a girl and running her through psychological torture to "make her free") and he can be violent, but maybe violent times call for violent measures.
  • (5/5)
    This is a very strong commentary about the political situation of todays world. I like Alan Moore because he says what everyone is afraid to say about how close to the edge of falling into fascism most of the worlds so called free and liberated first world countries truly are. Although this graphic novel was written about the political environment of the UK in the late 1980's it holds just as true (if not more so) today. The book was very different from the movie starring Hugo Weaving and Nathalie Portman but it is hard to say which I liked better. If you are interested in the works of Alan Moore this is the one I would reccomend for a first read.
  • (4/5)
    The film was something of a disapointment after reading the original in Warrior Comics back in the 1980's
  • (2/5)
    Heavily influenced by 1984, V is just too pretentious by half to really be effective. If you don't crack up when Finch, while tripping on acid, wanders through an abandoned concentration camp and laments how much he misses brown people, you're hopeless. Still, Moore was attempting to do something different, so I can respect that a bit.