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Watchmen

Watchmen

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Watchmen

Bewertungen:
4/5 (5,544 Bewertungen)
Länge:
434 Seiten
4 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736752467
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Watchmen von Kult-Autor Alan Moore gilt als einer der bedeutendsten und besten Comics aller Zeiten und konnte dank seiner Einzigartigkeit mehrere Eisner Awards, die Oscars der Comicbranche, gewinnen. Watchmen ebnete den Weg für Comics wie wir sie heute kennen und verlieh dem Superheldengenre bis dato ungeahnte Tiefe. Die düstere Geschichte wird dabei stets passend von den detailverliebten Zeichnungen von Dave Gibbons illustriert. Das Werk erhielt zudem einen Hugo Award und wurde vom Time Magazine in die Liste der hundert besten englischsprachigen Romane seit 1923 aufgenommen. Das Musikmagazin Rolling Stone nannte Watchmen "unvergleichlich", die New York Times Book Review "atemberaubend komplex", und für Entertainment Weekly ist es schlicht "ein Meisterwerk".
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736752467
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Alan Moore is an Architecture Modeling Specialist at The MathWorks. He has extensive experience in the development of real-time and object-oriented methodologies and their application. Alan was co-chair of the OMG's Real-time Analysis and Design Working Group and served as the language architect during the development of SysML.


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4.0
5544 Bewertungen / 203 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Masterpiece. The ultimate superhero book in every sense, irrevocably changing the genre while embracing it (that is, "masterpiece"). Worth it for the Tales of the Black Freighter.
  • (5/5)
    Unbelievable.
  • (4/5)
    The murder of a costumed hero sparks a chain of events that will change the world forever.If you're at all interested in the history of the comic book, you've heard of WATCHMEN. It revolutionized the medium and paved the way for all the edgier stuff that's come after. It's acclaimed not just as a comic book but as a serious work of literature. WATCHMEN may not be essential to an understanding of the late twentieth/early twenty-first century comic book, but it's undoubtedly an important work. I can't imagine why you'd want to cheat yourself out of it.Alan Moore has been praised for deconstructing the superhero, but I'd argue that he's doing much more than that. He's also crafted an alternate world in which one important change has had organic, logical consequences for society as a whole, and in doing so he's deconstructed the comic itself. It's brilliantly done. It's deep and complex and subtle. And it's hella interesting.In Moore's alternate world, Superman's first appearance inspired not just comic book creators but real people who donned costumes and hit the streets to fight crime. They've got day jobs and rent to pay and all the emotional problems that come along with everyday life. Few of them are wealthy. None of them have superpowers. They're just regular people who've costumed up for reasons as varied as their own personalities. Some of them really want to make a difference. Others hope to boost their careers. Some are on a power trip. A few just get off on the pretense. One is only in it because her mother has forced her. Moore comments on their place in the world via short excerpts from relevant sources, (autobiographies, scholarly papers, etc.), tacked onto the end of each chapter.I say that none of them have superpowers, but that's not quite true. Jon Osterman --aka Dr. Manhattan--is the lone superpowered superhero in this world. Jon gains his powers during a horrific accident in which his corporeal body is annihilated. He gains the ability to see and understand all things at all times. He knows the past, present and future as one. He can see exactly how subatomic particles come together. He has complete control over his own reformed body, which is blue and glowing. And his powers have changed him, mentally as well as physically. He's not your standard, "I must use my powers to fight crime and save the world!" superhero; neither is he the typical, "I shall use my powers to enhance my own personal glory!" kind of a supervillain. He just... is.He's had a huge impact on the world at large. The US won the Vietnam War, with his help. His ability to see and control subatomic particles has led to massive scientific breakthroughs, including efficient airships that have largely replaced airplanes and electric cars powered by public power hydrants. The world looks very much like our own, but it's really not. The changes are small, subtle, and absolutely vital to the way we react to the story. They don't sound like much on the surface, but they go deep. It's brilliant.Perhaps the most interesting shift, though, occurs within this alternate world's comic book industry. Faced with real-life heroes like Hooded Justice, Nite Owl and Dr. Manhattan, comic book creators feel no need to inundate the market with fictional heroes. Instead, comic books focus on pirates and ghouls - the very storylines, in fact, that came under so much scrutiny in our own world during the 1950's. Moore asks us to consider the comic book as escapist literature, as an art form, and in terms of its creative development. I find comic book history just fascinating, and I loved seeing how Moore's alternate world had diverged from our own where comics were concerned. My very favourite end-of-chapter excerpt dealt with how the government vetoed the creation of the Comics Code Authority, the organization that held such sway over our own comic industry for so long.Moore blends all these elements so well that you'll never notice the seams. He's crafted an absolutely fantastic piece of work that forces us to consider not only the society within the book but also our own world and its own brand of heroics. There's so much here. I haven't even scratched the surface.On the downside, Dave Gibbons's art is a little dated now. You'd never mistake this for a contemporary work; the use of line, coupled with John Higgins's colours, has a distinctly 80's feel to it. There are also some Cold War themes that may not resonate as well with those who didn't live through those times (translation: me).But on the whole, it's excellent. I highly recommend this to anyone with even a passing interest in comic books. It's a hefty tome, so far as graphic novels go, but it is most definitely worth it.(A slightly longer version of this review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • (4/5)
    A groundbreaking work in comics, Watchmen is an incredibly complex series. Originally published in twelve issues, Watchmen has now been gathered together as a single volume graphic novel. Although a bit dated at times, it remains a remarkable accomplishment and continues to receive awards and recognition. Watchmen is one of several comics that helped establish the genre as a "respectable" format for literature.Superheros, or costumed adventurers, are no longer accepted or condoned by general society and most have retired in their own individual fashions. But when The Comedian (who was never particularly well liked) is murdered, one of his old compatriots is convinced that the remaining heroes are also under threat. But what he manages to discover is a plan much more devious, one that may change humanity forever.Watchmen portrays these heroes as real people with real problems and personal conflicts. The fairly gritty story is juxtaposed against illustrations that use a fairly limited palette of mostly primary colors, creating a feeling of disjunction that is quite effective. Some may find the story itself tedious, but it is a book well worth reading.Experiments in Reading
  • (5/5)
    This is one of the most celebrated graphic novel of all times, and with good cause. Wonderfully complex and dynamic characters. An alternate history of the cold war between the United States and Russia with super heroes. But wait, who killed the Comedian? Is someone killing off masked avengers? BTW, there is only one hero with any real powers, that is Dr. Manhattan, and the others are people in costumes with good weaponless fighting skill. I got a weird vibe from this novel at first because it is very dark and a bit depressing as there are continual reminders of no life after death. Still, it is very psychologically complex and rich in character and plot. It blew me away, and I recommend it to everyone.
  • (4/5)
    After seeing the movie at the beginning of the year. I was curious about reading the graphic novel. So I reserved it at my library (it took 7 months to arrive but I finally got it). It was a nice reminder of the movie, I was happy for the little details that is always left out of a movie.Also the end is very different from the movie, (as a friend told me when the movie came out). I obviously liked the original, but I tought that the end of the movie still got to the point. And we didn't loose so much of the story line...Overall, I really enjoyed that book!
  • (5/5)
    Compilation of the twelve comic book issues, plus comments and bonus material.Considered a classic.
  • (5/5)
    It took me a long time to read this book, even though I was told repeatedly that I would love it. There was just something about comics that put me off. Finally, after reading Maus by Art Spiegelman and loving it, I decided to give Watchmen a shot, and I'm glad that I did.On the first read-through, I gave the book four stars. I've read it four times now, and each time it gets better and I notice things that I've missed during my previous read-throughs. The subject matter is really deep in places, and it's not a light read by any means.I will definitely be re-reading this book in the future (in fact, I started my fifth read-through today).
  • (4/5)
    Had to read it before the movie came out. was not disappointed. Yet to see the movie.
  • (5/5)
    Watchmen is highly addictive – once I began it, I wanted to do nothing else but read it, but, alas, life and its duties called. The art work is beautiful, with an array of both dark and bright colors used, realistically drawn figures, scenes filled with extraneous background details (which do, however, shed light on the happenings of this alternative history version of the world), and violence that is stylized enough not to be too disturbing but that still conveys the atmosphere of the dystopia created by Moore. The story itself, plot wise, isn’t all that different from typical “action” stories and movies. However, the way it unravels is done with perfection. Moore gives all of his characters fierce emotions, motivations, and back stories. Flashbacks are frequent in the novel and are transitioned into very well, both visually and textually. Moore also inserts another comic book within the pages of Watchmen – a fictional comic called The Tales of the Black Freighter. The narrative of this comic is interspersed within the narrative of Watchmen to underscore specific points in the story. In addition, Moore does something I find quite innovative for a graphic novel – at the end of each chapter he includes an “excerpt” from something within his fictional world (a memoir by a former superhero, clippings from a newspaper, etc.) which is mainly textual. Overall, a wonderfully executed book, both visually and textually, which I think would appeal to many, even those who don’t normally read graphic novels.
  • (5/5)
    It’s difficult to write anything new about Watchmen. I read this book about five years ago, pretty much before I really got into the whole sequential art as a way of story telling. I’ll admit I was fairly nonplussed when I read it then. This time around, for whatever reason, I just got the story. The plot is dense but superbly written and the art just somehow fits with the book. The prose background pieces inbetween each issue made compelling reading as well. It’s easy now to see why this book is held in such high regard. An undoubted classic.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book about the complexities of human psychology and human behavior. Also, superheroes.In actuality they aren't superheroes because they have no powers (all except one). I find it a fascinating story and a MUST READ.
  • (5/5)
    My first foray into graphic novels. As usual I'm late to the scene. However it was a rude awakening to the power of the medium and opened up a whole new genre for me. The plot was well thought and the implications apply as much today as they did back when the novel was written.
  • (3/5)
    I know. I know. This is an important book. I know the reasons why. But on an entertainment level, I thought it rather long and tedious. Not a fan of the coloring or Gibbons artwork either. Overrated
  • (5/5)
    Watchmen was the first comic-form narrative I ever read that didn't rely on onomatopoeia or inner dialogue to keep the plot running. It's a comic different than most other comics were at the time it was published, and not just because of it's dark, grim, sarcastic, etc., different method of storytelling.Moore makes you work to be entertained, which I like. Each chapter is divided by some "light reading," written by or about one of the characters in the book, and while reading these vignettes isn't MANDATORY, it's certainly worthwhile to better understand the subtle nuances found within.Watchmen is an alternate history work of fiction. Nixon is still president, some other stuff happened, and super heroes, who once garnered the affection of millions everywhere, are now reduced to mask-wearing vigilantes, one step removed from the criminals they fight to suppress.It's decades after the superhero golden ages, and a pack of the aging silver age heroes are once again reunited when one of their kind meets his death. Does the world need heroes once again? Why are they being targeted? Are larger things afoot?They go their separate ways, once more, but encounter each other again and again in a woven plot reminiscent of a Gordian knot. The Nite Owl, a sort of Batman, pulls the tarps off of his fancy toys, and the heroes once again hit the streets, finding clues to this new foe who threatens not only civilians, but heroes, and maybe even the entire world.Watchmen is more than a graphic novel. It's a comic masterpiece. The illustrations by Gibbons will blow your mind if you're paying attention. The storytelling by Moore will make you catch yourself, saying, "Why didn't I notice that?!"The book is great. It has a solid plot, lovable and hatable characters, and one of the best Doom Clock imagery I've every seen.If you're sick of Spidey fighting cotton-candy throwing leprechauns, you'll find yourself right at home with Watchmen.
  • (2/5)

    Seven out of ten. CBR format.

    Set in an world that closely mirrors the 1980's with the exception of the presence of "superheroes" who have enabled America to win the Vietnam War and keep Nixon in power. However, these superheroes are unpopular and have been outlawed and there is the possibility of an impending nuclear war with the Soviets.

  • (2/5)
    Loved the artwork, and the story kept me gripped. Liked the intertwining of the Black Frieghter story.

    Probably would have enjoyed it more in instalments. There's something about the comic form, and waiting for the next one that forces you to savour the one you have in the meantime.

  • (2/5)
    This was one of the most longest, boring graphic novels I have ever read. Yes I actually did finish the book because my husband wanted me to read it. I get the storyline but the verbiage throughout was way too much. The only saving grace were the backstories. That was the only thing I liked. I really don't get the guy reading the comic throughout the book... I really didn't understand it at all.
  • (4/5)
    I took a while to get into this graphic novel completely; some of the characters aren't immediately engaging, and some of the narrative techniques (such as the ongoing insertion of the 'pirate comic') broke up my reading flow a great deal. Also, I must admit, I'm allergic to the 80's -- even good stuff from the 80's makes me squirm. However, if you stick with it, you find that it's a wonderfully thoughtful, nuanced and intriguing story. It poses many questions, but also leaves some even more interesting questions implicit and unspoken. I enjoy a narrative that interrogates itself and begs interrogation this much. There's a reason this one is a classic.
  • (5/5)
    There is so much to absorb here - I felt like I was hit by a blunt force instrument. I'm going to plan to read this again in a year or two. This is a graphic novel that really lives up to or perhaps exceeds its reputation in the literary world.
  • (4/5)
    Having, I confess, watched the movie, I was eager to read the graphic novel that was its source material. I am a lemming, because I, too, preferred the book to the movie. The book had multiple layers, and went into greater detail on some vital topics, and frankly handled the whole "thing that unites the planet" better than the movie. Great grown-up comic book reading.
  • (5/5)
    Alan Moore is one of the giants of the comic book industry, but Dave Gibbons's art shouldn't be ignored in this graphic masterwork since he was the one who had to put up with thousands of words of script to translate into visual images. Unlike mangakas like Osamu Tezuka, Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman get other people to illustrate and translate their ideas into a visual form that gets turned into a finished product Graphic Novel.Alan Moore's ideas in this work are brilliant in their own right, and the fractured narrative style at the end of each chapter where bonus material is provided like "Under The Hood" excerpts from the First Nite Owl Hollis Mason's autobiography, shouldn't be skipped over because along with Dave Gibbons's graphic design and illustration for this graphic novel, Alan Moore makes reading the backstory of the Minutemen actually interesting, and he has the restraint to leave some particularly horrific happenings to the imagination as you read over the prose details in "Under the Hood".It takes up to the third read to truly "get" what this book is trying to say, and the Tales of the Black Freighter comic-within-a-comic is a metaphor for the struggle and madness of one of the characters, but not the one you would expect to be going through such a struggle.Dave Gibbons's art "seems" dated by today's standards but it fits with the 80s feel of the work. It's like a time capsule from another world, back when the Twin Towers were still up and people thought the Soviet Union was a pretty scary prospect (which it isn't now, because it disbanded and now we have our OWN GOVERNMENTS to be afraid of).In all this is one of the greatest superhero stories ever told, Moore's other graphic novel "Batman: The Killing Joke" takes on a conflict of two adversaries who are doomed to destroy each other (in the end) but Watchmen is a stand alone work which can be enjoyed with even only a little understanding of superhero comics fandom. I give it five stars for a good effort from both Moore and Gibbons.
  • (4/5)
    I believe that many other people have done in-depth reviews on the Watchmen before, so I'll just add my own opinion.I think that it is an exceptional graphic novel. It re-envisions the superhero and the serial comic. I especially like the way that each of the segments are told in a different perspective, which gives the story several viewpoints. I also like the small overlaps, like how the pirate comic intertwines with the dialog in the pane.In the end I was a bit disappointed with the end twist. Maybe I wished for something of a smaller scale, not so grandiose.The topic of the novel is quite current: How much evil can one do in the name of "ultimate good"?
  • (5/5)
    THE graphic novel. The benchmark for all comics. Superb.
  • (5/5)
    I don't think I can say anything about this book that hasn't already been said a million times. It really is the best superhero story ever written. Not only does it take the genre to a whole new level, but it does it while standing on the shoulders of every superhero book ever written. Moore's understanding of narrative structure is outstanding and the universe, in which the story takes place, is both uncanny and familiar at the same time. Not an easy read (even if it is not the most difficult of Moore's works, not by a long shot), but worth every second of your time. I try to read it atleast once a year. Absolutely stunning and worthy of it's legend!
  • (4/5)
    Genuine fans must hate us. A film gets made of something they love, have in fact loved for many years (since 1986 in the case of Watchmen), the book gets hyped because of the film, and people like me read it. I, the graphic novel tourist.'This is my first graphic novel' begins the review. They shudder. 'So I didn't know what to expect'... They recoil. 'I guess it was cool...'. They're banging their head against the wall. 'I liked the drawings'. They're struggling to keep their lunch down.So I'll be brief. This was my first graphic novel in years. I can't remember reading one since I was yay high and spent much of my days crawling around through Lego. To be honest I was worried it would feature too many POWs and BAMs, and perhaps too little substance. On this I was proved completely wrong. In fact I quickly forgot I was reading a graphic novel, it just felt like a regular novel for which my mind didn't have to think up the images.I ended up loving it. Themes of apocalypse and doom mixed with romance, regret, despair and a large blue (possibly) radioactive all-powerful man. Yes please!
  • (5/5)
    This isn't just a comic book! We all know about "superheros", but this book really challenges that archetype and shows the humanity and darker sides of society and those who are asked to protect it. Anyone interested in a great read would do well to read this and look past this as "just a comic book". It's literature!
  • (5/5)
    What would the world be like if instead of superheroes being 2-dimensional characters in comic books they were real people? How would that change history? What if we had superheroes in WWII? What about Vietnam and Korea? Would we have won the wars? Watchmen is the answer to these questions. The streets of America's cities are protected by masked adventurers who fight (mostly) for truth and justice (or a modeling contract). Unlike the perfect superheroes of current lore these people are plagued by the depression brought on by experiencing the dark underbelly of society everyday. In 1977, superheroes that were not employed by the government were outlawed and have since gone into forced retirement. But in 1985 the brink of nuclear world war and a series of masked adventurer murders have them hopping back into their tights and airships.I read this a long time ago in middle school and didn't grasp the significance of this book. I am now totally in love with it in a way I never could have been before. I would recommend this only for the serious reader, one who reads more than the bubble gum manga that was my fodder in middle school. This isn't just a great graphic novel, it is a great novel!
  • (5/5)
    Its Alan Moore's best work. He did a great job in his satire against religion, politics, and against itself (superhero comics in general). It was pieced together almost perfectly and I really enjoyed reading it. He made me interesting in comics, though his other works are not as memorable or as interesting.
  • (2/5)
    What is there once had been masked vigilantes, humans insipred by superhero comics, roaming the streets of New York City to keep the world safe? In this dystopian vision of just such a world, such activism has been outlawed since 1977 and most of those who participated have retired. But then one of them is murdered, and no one knows why or if the killer will strike again.I'm glad to be able to say I've read this title, but I didn't particularly enjoy it. It was gritty and violent and depressing and just not the kind of story I like. It's a complex story that I read much slower than I expected to. Recommended for fans of dystopian and apocalyptic fiction, maybe even hard-boiled mystery fans who want to read something a little different. Just not my cup of tea.