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Sandman, Band 10 - Das Erwachen

Sandman, Band 10 - Das Erwachen

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Sandman, Band 10 - Das Erwachen

Bewertungen:
1/5 (1,133 Bewertungen)
Länge:
217 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783957834959
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Der König der Träume ist tot - lang lebe der König der Träume! Und nun kommen alte Götter, Freunde und Feinde zusammen, um ihm die letzte Ehre zu erweisen und sich zu erinnern bei der seltsamsten Totenwache aller Zeiten. Die Echos dieses Todes hallen wider: Sie erreichen einen Mann, der nicht sterben will, und einen chinesischen Weisen, dessen Weg ins Exil ihn durch eine Wüste der Träume führt. Und am Ende seines Lebens erfüllt William Shakespeare seinen Teil einer sehr ungewöhnlichen Abmachung. DAS ERWACHEN ist das zehnte Buch aus der 10-bändigen SANDMAN-BIBLIOTHEK. Die SANDMAN-Bücher können sowohl in der Reihenfolge ihres Erscheinens als auch einzeln gelesen werden.
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783957834959
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman és un prolífic autor best-seller de novel·la i còmic. Elseu còmic més guardonat és The Sandman. De les novel·les per aadults destaquen American Gods, Neverwhere o El océano al final delcamino. I de literatura infantil i juvenil, Coraline, El llibre del cementirii Stardust. La seva obra ha estat molt guardonada amb premiscom la Medalla Newberry, el Premi Carnegie, l'Hugo, el Nebula,així com al World Fantasy i Will Eisner. El oceáno al final del caminova obtenir el premi de llibre de l'any del National Book Awardsdel Regne Unit. A més, molts dels seus llibres s'han adaptat a cinema,televisió i ràdio. La més recent és la nova sèrie de televisióbasada en American Gods.En Neil Gaiman és anglès d'origen però viu als Estats Units, ondona classes al prestigiós Bard College. El pots seguir a twitter a @neilhimself.


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Sandman, Band 10 - Das Erwachen - Neil Gaiman

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  • (5/5)
    The Basics

    This being the tenth volume of The Sandman, it’s hard to write about this without ultimately spoiling anyone. A lot of things have changed via the ending of the previous volume, and Gaiman is wrapping things up and saying some goodbyes.

    My Thoughts

    This is a weird review to write. I’ve been spending the last, several years, since I got into Gaiman, reading my way through The Sandman. As a result, this was pretty bittersweet. Dream has changed forms, and the title of this volume, The Wake, rings true. Everyone who ever knew Morpheus is showcased here, with glad and sour memories of him mixing all together in this big bowl of emotions. It was hard not to feel a pang, because this clearly wasn’t just his goodbye. It was for the reader, as well, and it was felt.

    The last comic that rounds out the entire series really was a nice touch. It was Gaiman returning to the storyline that made The Sandman so famous in the literary crowd with a play on William Shakespeare’s The Tempest and the playwright’s life, his mission to write plays for Morpheus. In wrapping that subplot up, he manages to do the same for the series as a whole, and it makes for a lovely final farewell to Dream and his realm.

    I wish I knew what else to say, but this volume was short and mostly nostalgic for someone who’s been working through the series as I have. It’s sort of a personal journey, ending something so big like this, and not something I can critique the merits of with anything other than the verbal equivalent of a sad smile. I do still have Endless Nights ahead of me. That’s a comfort.

    Final Rating

    5/5
  • (4/5)
    Phew, this was probably the most confusing episode I've read so far, at least the first 60 to 80 pages. I could not believe it: One of the Endless died? Or what? Or not? And also the two different stories at the end, which are very nice (especially the drawings of the last but one) confused me at the beginning even further. Do they have anything to do with the death of the Endless? And if yes – what? To complicate matters further all the figures of the past stories turned up again, from those I can remember a few, unfortunately, only vaguely. My conclusion: I have to read all this again, but with less time interval between the different episodes.
    Whatever, this is an ending for such a serial like it has to be - mysterious and sad with beautiful pictures, but not without hope. Because: “And everything changes. And nothing is truly lost.”
  • (5/5)
    This final installment of the Sandman series was utterly gorgeous, both in prose and in illustration. The drawings gave a beautiful weight to the words, finishing the story in the perfect manner. It was one of the best volumes of the series.
  • (5/5)
    Gaiman concludes the series with an amazing blend of writing and artwork. After the events of The Kindly Ones, the reader is brought on a sorrow-filled journey of picking up the pieces. Almost every reader will identify immediately with Mathew, and his thoughts and feelings about Dream and the current situation. What a wonderful conclusion to a masterful series.
  • (4/5)
    After the death of Dream - intriguing - a bit long and drawn out - week compared to the rest of the run - but outstanding compared to any other graphic and most non-graphic novels
  • (3/5)

    Six out of ten.

    The conclusion of the series, wrapping up the remaining loose ends in a three-issue "wake" sequence, followed by three self-contained stories.

  • (4/5)
    This collection forms a kind of epilogue to the story that ended with the Sandman's death in The Kindly Ones. There is a three-part tale of the wake and funeral of the Sandman, and then 3 stand-alone stories which also tie up some loose ends. It is two of these, 'Sunday Mourning' and 'The Tempest' which I found really outstanding, and make this collection a must-read. This collection brought an end to the Sandman story arc and I must say its a little difficult goodbye to the characters and stories. In way the theme of saying good-bye which runs through this collection makes it easier to come to terms with the end of the series. (As does the knowledge that there are a whole bunch of spin-offs which follows various characters from the series out there, Death, Lucifer, The Endless, the Dead Boy Detectives, The Books of Magic etc. - yaay!)
  • (5/5)
    This is a beautiful closing chapter to the Sandman saga. I love Michael Zulli's artwork, particularly the delicacy that he uses to draw the new Dream, and John Muth's art for the story "Exiles" is a triumph. After the tumult of The Kindly Ones, Gaiman gives the reader a chance to reflect, mourn, and look forward to things to come. Lovely.
  • (3/5)
    It was interesting but I didn't like it enough to go on to read the rest of the series. This may well be due to the medium of the graphic novel, rather than Gaiman's skill as an author.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite book in the series. I'm so sad it's over.
  • (4/5)
    In this book, we find the Endless mourning the loss of one their own, Dream. I have not read the previous story, so I really don't know why Dream is dead. But, like all Incarnations, Dream is reborn, just different.I liked this book. It is sad, happy, hopeful, angry, full of emotions all at the same time. We see all of Dreams brothers and sisters. And, they react in different ways.As always the story sits just at the edge of understanding - The art in this book is fabulous. My only suggestion is maybe read the previous novel first. It is a bit disjointed without knowing what happened.
  • (5/5)
    This is my third re-read of Sandman, which given I don't own the books and have to scrounge them off friends is a sign of how much I like them. They're very well woven, and really benefit from being read back-to-back. I love the subtlety of the messages, and the fact that you can draw some very contradictory morals from them...
  • (5/5)
    The final volume of The Sandman (not counting the self-contained, limited stories), in which Neil Gaiman and his readers say goodbye to Morpheus, the Lord of the Dreaming. The first part of the story resolves the events from the previous volume, The Kindly Ones, after which Gaiman presents three self-contained stories, one about Hob Gadling and another William Shakespeare. The Wake is a satisfying conclusion to the regular Sandman series while leaving enough in play that Gaiman could return if he chose to revisit this world.The Sandman series is nothing short of modern mythology writ large and exemplifies everything to which the comics medium aspires. Its thematic range and Gaiman's unique voice ensure that it will remain a staple of graphic storytelling for years to come. It deserves to be mentioned in the same awed tones as Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns, and Jack Kirby's work.
  • (4/5)
    A good 'ending' piece to The Sandman works (though there is volumes 11 and 12, according to the back cover). 'The Wake' - like real wakes and funerals and memorials and viewings - was a bittersweet reviewing of the works of Sandman, with the future of Dream. Not Morpheus. Not Sandman, but Dream the Endless' future. The recapping of the lives of the secondary characters (Gadling, Rose, Lyta, Shakespeare, etc.) was a good way of making a Wake more than about just the person who died, but about those who were touched BY the person who died. Which is the true testament and legacy of a person (or character). How they touched the lives of others, how they bettered them, and things don't have to be optimistic, or hopeful, but that they continue, even with the death of the person/character, life continues for the rest of us, to be touched by others lives/characters and to learn from them, and to go to more funerals and wakes, and to some day have people go to our funeral and wake and recall how they were touched by our lives.
  • (4/5)
    This volume contains my favorite art of the series but my least favorite stories. Which is not to say they are bad stories, it is merely that this is a volume intended to wrap up loose threads and reads as such. Nevertheless, even when 'sweeping up', Gaiman is an exemplary storyteller.
  • (5/5)
    This is the tenth and final book in the Sandman series by Gaiman and various illustrators. It was a wonderful conclusion to the series and I really enjoyed it.The first two parts of this graphic novel deal with the death of Morpheus. We watch as the Endless prepare for his Wake and as people travel to the Dreaming to attend. There is much reminiscing. The last parts deal more with the new Morpheus and the affects of him taking over the dreaming.This was a stunning closure to the series. After the heart-breaking ending in book 9 where Morpheus chooses Death over continuing to run the Dreaming, this book was good closure for readers. It was nice to reminisce along with the other characters about things that had happened previously and about how Morpheus affected everyone's lives. It was good to watch the new Morpheus take-over and see life continue. It really drove home the point of the Endless...which is that they are...well...endless.Some of the illustration throughout was absolutely stunning. The scenes from Morpheus's Wake are just breathtaking. Some of the later sections are done in a more stylized way and are just as breathtaking for their simplicity.Overall this was a fantastic conclusion to this series; although I am bit sad to reach the end of it. I kind of want to start reading it all over again right now. If you have been enjoying the Sandman series thus far, you definitely will love this final installment.
  • (4/5)
    will neal marry me? o, he's married already; i keep forgetting.
  • (5/5)
    Finale of this wonderful, powerful, emotional, epic, fantasmagorical series.
  • (3/5)
    So this is the last Sandman. Not a big deal really. Kind of boring - somber and slow. The art was nice. The last story had a bunch of quotes from "The Tempest" and I'm not much of a Shakespeare fan so it didn't really move me. Some nice creative touches but once again I'm underwhelmed and left wondering why this series is such a big deal.
  • (4/5)
    The world gathers in the Dreaming to bid farewell to a point of view.And now we see what happens After. This is a much quieter volume than any that has come before. It's sombre and introspective, and it's not about moving forward so much as saying goodbye. That's not to say that there are no developments and no growth; Dream, in particularly, changes a great deal over the course of this story, both literally and because we learn more about his past through his former lovers' reminiscences. The focus, however, is on the farewells. We see how each of the characters is dealing with the aftermath of The Kindly Ones, and we ourselves are given a chance to say goodbye both to Morpheus and to his unusual family.However, the wake itself isn't the end. It does provide us with all the closure we really need, but there are also three stories at the end that tie up a few other loose ends and give us some further insight into everything we've just read. We see Hob one final time. We return to a Soft Place in the company of a disgraced bureaucrat . And we watch Shakespeare discharge his debt to Dream. While I enjoyed Hob's story very much, the other two weren't entirely perfect. I can take or leave the courtier in the desert, and Shakespeare's story drags a little now that I'm so familiar with it. There's one line, though, right near the end, that makes the whole thing worthwhile. It just throws Morpheus into relief. I find myself reconsidering his entire story in light of this one tiny piece of information. The story was deep to begin with, but this one line raises the water level to a whole new height.Highly recommended, but you really should read the rest of the series first.
  • (4/5)
    SPOILERS AHEAD!!! SPOILERS AHEAD!!!I finished The Wake just now. Just this second. I have spoken to no one about its contents. This is an instant reaction, a far cry from the last few posts. I wonder what I thought it would be. No, I don't. I know that I thought I would be introduced to the new Dream, but I was not. He is a minor character in these stories. In many ways it seems these are the stories that didn't fit anywhere else. Gaiman writes on the page after the last of the story that he is good at goodbyes. I am not. I am a little confused. I think there is some sort of memory thing I am supposed to be cherishing with the last tale, but all I can think is: he's dead, let him be..The story begins with the actual wake for the Dream who has just died: Morpheus. I truly enjoyed Matthew's journey from denial into acceptance. I really identify with Matthew. The new Dream (Daniel) who we meet briefly is actually quite charming. He is very sympathetic, and his sense of duty seems mingled with doing what is right by others. This is a change from the last Dream who did what was his duty, but did not always seem to consider the well-being of the others around him. Only five of the Endless show up for the wake and funeral. Destruction visits Daniel, but he does not visit his siblings. I like him less for that. Mostly I am disappointed that we don't hear what Death says, only that "her words make sense of everything. She gives you peace. She gives you meaning." I want peace and meaning! I feel a little cheated by that. This story/episode/whatever breaks the fourth wall and makes use of the second person. It's rarely done in modern lit, and it's always disconcerting to me. We were all there, supposedly, but I have no memory of it. It's a strange blending of realities.After the wake and funeral have concluded, we catch up with our friend Hob Gadling. He has found new love and still does not desire death, even though he knows Morhpeus is dead. He is an interesting character. I like him. I like the fact that when he falls asleep he dreams that Dream and Destruction walk with him on a beach. When his girlfriend asks him how the story ends, he says, "Well, there's only one way to end a story, really." I love the contrasting worldviews here. Amidst this great tragedy, someone random tells us the only way to end a story is happily. It's my kind of worldview for sure.Gadling's story is followed by a weird Chinese one that seems to have happened in the past, but I think Daniel is the Dream rather than Morpheus. You can't really tell from the artwork, but at one point it says, "Flames flicker in the whiteness of his robe," and that sounds like Daniel to me rather than Morpheus. Besides, Daniel gives the man an open invitation, which does not seem like something Morpheus would do. Once rejected, Morpheus seems to be incapable of renewing the offer. Daniel is much more human, as one of the introductions pointed out (not this one because I haven't read it). I think though, that the ability to retain one's humanity once you become a god might diminish with age. Death is very cool, but not everyone can have her upbeat personality. Definitely most people would be jaded by immortality. I think even my boyfriend, but who knows.The final story returns to Shakespeare, and it is about the writing of The Tempest rather than A Midsummer Night's Dream. We meet Judith and Anne. Anne is horrible, but at one point Judith points out that she was really heartbroken when her husband left for London. She at least allows him to sleep in his house and see his daughter. It is, perhaps, more than I could have done. I can't harbor ill will towards her. Shakespeare is a little whiny in this piece, and I wonder what critics have made of that. He is very concerned with his afterlife in a way that upsets me a little. I guess one of the coolest things about Shakespeare is that we know so damned little about him. We can make him whatever we like. There is also some amazing hubris in the idea that Gaiman's Morpheus inspires Shakespeare. Shakespeare admits to borrowing tales and speeches. Isn't that enough?I am keenly aware now of the fact that I have finished the series. I felt like I had finished it with Worlds' End. By the time, I got to The Kindly Ones, I had already accepted Dream's death. Now, I feel like I have mourned him and am ready for a new distraction/fascination. As far as book exchanges go though, this one was way more my thing than Stephen King's Dark Tower series, although I enjoyed that too in my own way. I find more and more that reading is a way for me to get through hard times. I know I am probably escaping rather than dealing, but I don't see a need to fight every battle. Lonliness and disappointment need not be thought about so much; there isn't really much one can do about them anyway. Lesson planning is necessary, however, and I must think on that now. :) Blessed with work and blessed with children. That I am.I forgot to mention that in this book we figure out who Dream has been brooding over! It's Thessaly/Larissa the witch!!! I hate to sound gossipy (kind of), but I just can't believe she's his type. How could he ever be fooled into thinking she had a heart? Okay, I'm done now.
  • (3/5)
    A good conclusion to a stellar series.
  • (5/5)
    10 volumes in and this was my favorite. The artwork was subtle yet stunning, unexpected for a graphic novel. I'll miss Dream the most, but I grew fond of Delirium and felt full real-tear empathy for Despair. I suppose Death and I will chat another time.
  • (4/5)
    This volume completes the series. The first part of it is very interesting, with the ceremony for the dead Dream and all the little details of the rules that surround this ceremony. It's an awesome sort of farewell to the series. All the character arcs are wrapped up and given some sort of resolution, even if the stories have been cut short by death.

    Not my favourite volume, but a nice conclusion, with some beautiful art.
  • (5/5)
    And so the saga concludes – and continues. The epilogue of the Sandman series deals with legacy, expectation, loss… but perhaps most of all with forgiveness and mercy. Less a story per se, and more a gentle mediation where we drift between snippets of conversation at Morpheus’ wake and follow the new Dream in the last hours before metting with his family, this is a contemplative read full of cameo appearances from the whole series. Several of the people condemned by Morpheus along the way are released, given peace. The whole thing is more lyrical and still than anything else.But in the stories that make up the end of this voulme, we also get other ambiences. The chapter about Hob at the reneassance fair, where he come sto terms with the darker sides of his own past, is profound and human, but also probably the funniest in the whole series. The ambience as we return to the soft place in the Gobi desert is surreal, steep and angular (don’t you just love how the bridge comes about!), giving us another perspective again on the difference between the old and the new Dream.Cursing in church a nit now: To me, the weakest chain in this link is the story about Shakespeare writing the Tempest. It’s Gaiman flaunting his biographical knowledge again, and even though the speculation around why Dream would want exactly that play is interesting, I guess i’m just not interested in Shakespeare’s personal life to really take this to my heart. All in all, a more than worthy conclusion to an amazing series. I for one think it’s Gaiman’s finest. In my humble opinion, none of his prose is quite up to par with this achievement.
  • (5/5)
    In which Morpheus, the Dream King, the Sandman, is no more, the Endless and all of humanity attends a wake, and Daniel has transfigured into Dream of the Endless. There are a lot of impressive imagery, lovely speeches, and cameos by the most powerful of this and other worlds, but the heart of this story is Matthew and (formerly) Daniel and their respective struggles to deal with and acclimatize themselves to a completely new situation.Although very much the end of a story, the emphasis in this installment is of a beginning. We have a new Dreamlord and he is very much different from the last. Currently confused by his surroundings and how to adjust to those who work in his palace, he has a sensitivity about him that will serve him, as well as the dreamer, well in the future. The only thing that's left to ponder is that perhaps he is too much different from the old one - if once, however many years in the future, this Dream decides he's done, it will most likely be because of feeling too much than too little for his loved ones (and I am very sure he will have many).There is a lovely play on words in this installment, since the first part deals with what happens in the wake of recent events, the second is an actual wake, and in the last, we, the dreamer, wake from the dream and the whole series. As usual, along with the more serious issues, there are some wonderful levity to be had, such as Matthew meeting a few of the Endless (and Barnabas) for the first time and, since all their names start with the letter "D," says, “Hello. Let’s see: you two I know. Delirium…Death. I thought you only wore black. You must be… Let’s see: Desire. Despair. Destiny. And, uhm… Dog?”After the end of the overall story, there are three more stories told, one of Hob Gadling at a Renaissance Fair where he finds out that his dream of the wake was true, but that he gets to keep the bargain Dream and he made; one of a Chinese man, exiled by the Emperor, who finds his way into a soft place, where he meets both past and current Dream - and the new one shows his colors by releasing the army from the story "Soft Places;" and the last about Shakespeare finishing the second play Dream had commissioned and where it seems evident that it was Dream's plan all along to "break [his magician's] staff...and drown [his] book."
  • (5/5)
    Afslutningen på The Sandman. Morpheus er død og mange af slægtninge og venner samles.Det hele foregår selvfølgelig i en drømTil sidst krydser Morpheus spor med Wiliam Shakespeare, som har skrevet The Tempest som del af en handel med Morpheus.Supergod tegneseriefortæling/myte skrevet over flere år og i alt 10 bind + et bonusbind. En dekalogi i 11 bind.
  • (3/5)
    Ok so. This thing about how Dream has died. Somehow. Though he's not really a living thing, but all right. In the last book, where that happened, I was disappointed. Since I found out about it at the beginning, I was waiting for something big to cause it -- a severe sacrifice, or a severe miscalculation, something severe enough to justify such a big leap. But I'm disappointed in the reasoning. I don't think readers really understand the Orpheus thing, because while it looked like a big deal, no one said very much about it. So why did this really have to happen?And, this is important, but controversial: I don't think Dream is strong enough of a character to pull us into a tragedy with him. I think that actually this is one of those series where the title character is one of the least compelling pieces. He is cool, but I think that he rarely appears to be anything. His most vibrant moments are mostly when his sister Death is talking with him, because she is awesome. 5 stars for Death. So much so that I wondered, was this idea just an excuse to get her in the picture to say some really good stuff to him? But that's not it. And I don't buy him as reluctant sullen romantic anti-hero -- the whole thing with Nuala's being in love with him after being his servant for so long and inadvertently dooming him by calling him to her, just, no. Thessaly's story about their relationship is at least somewhat intriguing, though not really in line with the Dream King we've seen.There's some nice endings in this book, but not a lot of answers, which is what I hoped for. I still don't really get why this happened to Dream, and why baby Daniel took his place. Among other things. I felt frustrated that the funeral was followed by a bunch of short stories, because I needed more of the real story. The art in this volume is the most wonderful in the whole series, though, a huge improvement over the solidly icky looking Book 9. And Matthew the raven's angst was really good.I wonder what the heck is going to be in Book 11.