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Fables, Band 9 - Wölfe

Fables, Band 9 - Wölfe

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Fables, Band 9 - Wölfe

Bewertungen:
4/5 (535 Bewertungen)
Länge:
128 Seiten
41 Minuten
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783957836212
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die Gemeinschaft der Fables, die verborgen unter uns lebt, musste unter ihrem langjährigen Gegenspieler, den sie nur "den Feind" nennen, einiges erdulden. Nun wird es Zeit, die Rechnung zu präsentieren und dem Eroberer klarzumachen, dass die Kosten für die Unterwerfung der letzten Festung freier Magie zu hoch sind, selbst für ihn. Die einzige Märchengestalt, die diesen Auftrag durchführen kann, hält sich aber selbst in der Wildnis versteckt, und selbst wenn man ihn findet, wird es einige Überredungskunst kosten, ihn für den Plan zu gewinnen. Zum Glück für Fabletown wartet nicht einfach nur ein kleiner Ausflug hinter die feindlichen Linien auf Bigby Wolf. Außer den Heften 48-51 der vielfach prämierten Serie von Bill Willingham enthält dieser Band auch Karten, die den Grundbesitz der Fables in der Welt der Sterblichen zeigen.
Freigegeben:
28. Jan. 2020
ISBN:
9783957836212
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Bill Willingham is the critically-acclaimed, award-winning creator of several iconic comic book series, including the bestselling Fables franchise. In 2003, its first year of publication, Fables won the prestigious Eisner award for Best New Series, and has gone on to win fourteen Eisners to date. Bill lives in the wild and frosty woods of Minnesota.


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4.0
535 Bewertungen / 24 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    This series is very consistent, and the wedding was quite nice. The reference to Israel was a little weird, though.
  • (4/5)
    Great volume. I especially liked Bigby's story and the part where he uses the Israel analogy to scare the Adversary. Brilliant stuff!
  • (4/5)
    What Willingham has done in Fables is to create a world, and a true world of this nature provides some joyful problems for the reader. The problem is the pace of the work. I constantly want to know more about everyone, and there simply isn't room to move the plot any faster. I say it is a joyful problem because I would trade these characters for anything. I could not cut the parts about the Homelands in favor of advancing Snow White's story. I would not abandon Boy Blue's problems just so I could see how Prince Charming is doing as mayor. I greedily read each new volume the second I get it for that small step towards a resolution it gives, and love every frame.And the world of Fables just keeps getting larger. Last volume introduced some of the Eastern fables such as Sinbad, while this volume brings us into the cloud world of the giants. Still, there is plenty of news from Fabletown and also the Farm, as well as another forage into the Homelands, this time by Bigby. Issue #50 advances THAT particular plot a great deal and in a direction I had not expected, so I am interested to see what will become of this new course.
  • (4/5)
    Snow White's kids are starting to grow up a little, and it's time for them to start learning to control their transformations so that they can leave the Farm. Easier said than done; if you could fly and turn into a wolf, wouldn't you tend to do so at a moment's notice? Elsewhere, Mowgli is trying to track down Bigby Wolf -- Prince Charming has a job for him.I do kind of wonder what direction the series is going to go in, now that Snow and Bigby are reunited. I assume that all is not going to stay happily ever after for long, but it's hard to say..
  • (4/5)
    Fables: Wolves is a really good installment of the series. Mowgli travels the world in search of the Big Bad Wolf, while Prince Charming becomes Mayor Machiavelli. Violence and whimsy ensue.
  • (4/5)
    Oh! Bigby! I'm so happy to see you again! My love for Bigby Wolf, the former sheriff of Fabletown is almost absolute. In the world of comic book crushes, Bigby is only second to Nightwing and Christian Walker. So any book that focuses on him is going to be A-O.K. with me. I do want to praise Willingham and company for the elegant way that Bigby returns to Fabletown. It manages to incorporate a trip back to the Homelands, Bigby doing what Bigby does best and the sentimental reunion with Snow, all without breaking the previously established laws of Fabletown. I also enjoyed the Secret-Agent Cinderella at the end of this volume. The Giant Kingdoms are a trip, and watching Cindy manuever in this environment is wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    Wolves is, as can be guessed from the name, a story about Bigby and his family. In this case, how a Fable goes out in search of him, how he returns home, and what he must do for Fabletown to be accepted back.The story is interesting enough, and the art is exceptional as ever. Although I miss those little vignetty-type things on the borders of the page, that we have seen in many collections.The stand-alone story is this time about Cinderella, Fabletown's own spy at large. She takes on an interesting mission in the Cloud Kingdoms and solves it ingeniously.At the end of the book is the script for one of the Fabel issues (50, Happily Ever After), which is probably good for true enthusiasts of those interested about the art of comic writing. I have to admit that it was interesting to compare the script to those of Neil Gaiman for Sandman. Two very different styles of planning a comic...
  • (5/5)
    Mowgli is off looking for the missing Bigby Wolf in a bid to free Baghera from a cage on the Farm. The problem is Bigby is excellent at hiding himself when he doesn't want to be found and now is definitely one of those times. A wild goose chase ensues leading Mogwli through Russian when he realises the reason the lead goes cold. Bigby is not being recognised by humans because he is using his other allies, the wolves. Luckily for Mowgli he was raised by wolves and knows their language and their ways.There is a mission for Bigby that involves Jacl's beanstalk beans. Wolves are not natural climbers, but he has a mission that needs him to go into the Cloud Kingdoms to pull a massive hit and run on the Adversary. He is just the man/wolf for the job and if he suceeds in his mission he will be able to be reuinted with Snow and his children. My favourite in the series so far as it has some great closure. Bigby and Snow are two of my favourite characters and it was great to advance their story so much. I can't wait to see what trouble their brood get into and I hope Rose Red has a greater part to play in later stories.
  • (5/5)
    Reason for Reading: next in the series.Comment: A very good issue! Lots of secret missions involving action, adventure and revenge. The tying up of an old plot and the introduction of a new fairy tale realm sets the stage for the focus to shift in a new direction come the next volume. As the title obviously tells us this volume concentrates mostly on Bigby, Snow and family. We start with a 2 part issue with the titular name that focuses on Mowgli's mission to find Bigby. Then comes a larger than usual issue, issue #50 in fact, which doesn't give it's title until the end. This issue has Bigby following his mission he was called home for and then brings Snow and the family into play with a big ending. In this issue we also get a brief glimpse of a new fairy tale realm. Finally we end with one issue of Cindy on a covert mission to the new realm which involves lots of life and death situations but unfortunately for her mostly depends on diplomacy. From here the reader assumes that the addition of this realm will be of help in the future fight against the adversary. An interesting addition to the volume is the 48 page script for Issue #50. I did not read any where near the whole thing but I did start to read it and then flipped through and read bits and pieces and found it quite interesting to see how much like a play script a graphic novel starts out with and how much the author visualizes the finished pages, yet can also leave vague ideas for the artists to follow up on. Great story. Popping over to put an ILL request in for volume 9 right away!
  • (5/5)
    This is the eighth installment in the Fables series. I really enjoyed this installment, we finally get a reunion between Bigby and Snow! We also get to learn more about Snow’s children.In this installment Mowgli finally finds Bigby and Bigby is given a mission to the Cloud Kingdom. If Bigby can complete his mission there’s a chance that him and Snow can finally be together once and for all.I liked this book much better than Arabian Nights (and Days); we finally get some resolution around the whole Bigby/Snow relationship. We also get to meet their children in more detail and follow as they learn to control their powers.Additionally we are introduced to a new kingdom called the Cloud Kingdom. Fabletown desperately wants an alliance with the Cloud Kingdom. Cinderella also played a much bigger role in this book; I enjoyed her character and am curious to see what happens with her in the future.The book includes the original “script” from one of the scenes at the end and this was an entertaining read as well.Overall a fun addition to Fables; I really enjoyed this installment and am curious to see what happens next. Definitely recommended for fans of the Fables comics. Also recommend for urban fantasy fans or fans of fairy tale retellings.
  • (2/5)
    Oh noes, two Fables volumes in a row that I didn't care for at all. A major plot arc is resolved and it's desperately boring.
  • (4/5)
    Oh, resolution tpb. This is the one which brings Bigsby (and Ghost) back. And sets Bagira free, because Mowgli accomplished that earlier task, through fire and great schemes of Bigsby not wanting to be found.

    I *LOVE* all the scenes with the little kids. And I like that they are being trained up proper by The North Wind, and that they get challenged that until they can make 30 days they can not leave. I love how much Red continues to grow.

    I love that Bigsby went on a mission before coming back, and the whole of the conversation between Charming (as Snow's ex-husband who actually cares about the if...) an' Bigsby (as the father of Snow's children) before he leaves about whether there should be some message to give. Which I won't spoil because it was too perfect.

    I love how exactly they get around the rule. And I love the whole of the wedding issue. I love all the little new insights into Cinderella.

  • (5/5)
    I think this is my favorite volume so far. This is where Snow's children finally get named, individual personality and Snow and Bigby's Relationship finally turns. I also liked Mowgli's adventure finding Bigby, and Cinderella's adventure in the sky kingdom.
  • (4/5)
    Mowgli's quest to find Bigby takes him all over the world and Bagheera gets free run of The Farm, Bigby gets a quest for himself which takes him to the Cloud Kingdom with Cindy (who gets a gruesome task of her own), and Snow finally gets to introduce her cubs to their father. Another great installment - I especially liked getting a view into how a tormented Bigby would protect himself (unsuccessfully) against heartache and how Mowgli manages to handle the great wolf. The reunion of Snow and Bigby is also on my list of favorite scenes in this series.
  • (3/5)
    (Beware: some mild spoilers in this review. There really are none, because most of the things I mention you can see coming from miles ahead.)

    Mowgli searches for (and finds) Bigby Wolf -- and if you call that a spoiler, you'll need to read a lot more books, since that was utterly predictable. The main part of this book is about what Bigby has to do so he can live with Snow White and his offspring while not breaking the rules of Fabletown. Which leads to the introduction of yet more characters from European Fables -- and these ones were a surprise for me. ("Big And Small", the final story collected in this issue, features more of this newly introduced world.)

    And thus we've ended up at the controversial "Israel" part of the story, where Bill Willingham just drops the ball in spectacular fashion by featuring a mind-numbingly simplistic view of that subject. See those three stars I've given this book? I'm struggling with myself to defend that high score, because of the myopic way this politically charged topic is used -- and the saccharine, drawn out crap that passes for the marriage between Bigby and Snow White later on in the book does not help (again, this is not a spoiler). If this book had not featured plenty of kick-ass Cinderella, I might have handed it merely one star.

    So now I have to ask myself: do I keep reading? Will "Fables" recover from this ridiculous nonsense? Or will it bring more stories that lack nuance, more violence as revenge?
  • (2/5)
    Mowgli continues his search for Bigby through Russia and the wilderness. Meanwhile, Snow White tries to raise the cubs at the Farm.


    Mowgli finds Bigby and convinces him to come back to Fabletown for one last mission. Cinderella has negotiated a treaty with the Cloud Kingdom, so Bigby is able to climb a beanstalk, travel through the clouds, and land right in the Adversary's Empire. He burns down the Sacred Grove, and in thanks Fabletown gives him a valley where he and Snow can live together with their shape-changing cubs. He and Snow reunite and get married. It's all very saccharine...none of it had any tension or stress. Even Bigby's mission to destroy the Adversary's greatest resource felt lackluster.
  • (3/5)
    It's not as bad as the previous volume, but this is still tepid stuff. Willingham is now displaying his politics in bright, blazing colors - he literally stops the story dead to go into a pro-Israel rant - and the misogyny present in the Bigby/Snow White relationship has come to the fore. (It's really somewhat distressing, too, because I expected it to be a slightly eye-rolling point of conflict, not the lead-in to their wedding!) Frankly, Willingham needs to step away from the soap operatics and focus on the war storyline; I don't agree with every political comparison he's making, but at least I feel like he knows where he's going. The relationship stuff is weak in comparison.
  • (3/5)
    This book picks up where the previous one left off, with Mowgli in pursuit of Bigby while Snow White remains banished to the Farm to raise her children in Bigby's absence.Despite being heavy on the Bigby-Snow story line, this wasn't one of my favorite volumes in the series. Part of that was the long, tedious introduction with Mowgli going about searching for Bigby unsuccessfully among humans and then turning to wolves, where a drawn-out battle 'needs' to be held between Mowgli and the alpha male of the pack. Never having been a huge fan of the gratuitous action sequence, I found this section rather dull and pointless. Some bits of the Cloud Kingdom sequence were also a bit on the lengthy, unnecessary side, but this was less of an issue. On the positive end, I did love the parts dealing with Bigby, Snow, and their litter of children.This book is slimmer than the other volumes -- even more so than appearances would let on, as the book ends with a complete script to the "Happily Ever After" segment. This isn't really a huge selling point per se, but it is a neat add-on, providing insights to the creative process and entertaining notes on how the illustrations should be, such as: "This is the truest of true love's kisses since the beginning of time. It's every poem ever written and every song ever sung. This is the one panel at which the dream of every female reader of FABLES has come true. Each and every one of them must be made to cry or squeal or swoon like a character in a Jane Austen novel. Don't blow it, Buckingham. We sort of, kind of know where you live."At the end of the day, the book was still interesting enough that I'm going to pick up the next one in the series, but I'm a little less "full steam ahead" about continuing than I was previously.
  • (5/5)
    This is an outstanding book! It very nearly stands alone from the series; there's enough history woven into it to make the story make sense. But I think having read the previous books makes this one all the richer.

    I don't entirely like how Bigby's face is drawn - in a lot of frames, he seems to have forgotten to put in his dentures. But that's the closest to a complaint I have about the art; it's otherwise outstanding. Some of the cover art is breath-taking.

    And I do believe I have a massive crush on Mowgli. He's all grown up and terribly appealing in this series. I hope we get to see more of him (and I don't just mean his body, but I won't cry about that either) in the next books.
  • (5/5)
    I've only been waiting FOREVER for more Bigby action!!! After Bigby's self-exile from Fabletown, Prince Charming decides that enough is enough. He sends Mowgli to track down where in the world the wolf went. Prince Charming has a plan and he can't do it without Bigby. He promises to find a way for Bigby to be with Snow White and their children, which is all that Bigby really wanted anyways. The task he's given is beyond dangerous but he's definitely the man for the job. Nothing will get between him and his family.
  • (4/5)
    This was a good one. Snow White and her pack are still confirmed to the farm where she and Rose Red are trying to teach the children that it’s important that they control their flying and shape changing abilities. Mowgli continues his search and finally tracks Bigby Wolf down. Bigby goes on a mission to the Empire and his and Snow White’s dilemma is finally resolved.Of course not all storylines are resolved, the North Wind has taken himself off somewhere and Cinderella has a promise made to Frau Totenkinder hanging over her head. Also, we have yet to learn Geppetto’s reply to Fabletown’s threat. But all in all, a fun read!
  • (5/5)
    Yay Bigby and Snow finally get married and have a happily ever after.
  • (4/5)
    this saga really hits maturity in #8. there's just so much backstory and characterization now to draw on. and the canvas extends well past Fabletown and the Farm, and the mundy world beside it, into the Cloud (aka the Cloud Cuckoo) realms. and the series goes right on dusting off old fairy tales and finding good uses to fold them in. fun stuff, well woven.
  • (5/5)
    Mostly revolves around Bigby, as the title states: Mowgli finds Bigby, Bigby goes on super-secret mission, Bigby weds Snow. Also has a tale of Cindy's political dealings. Good for tying up loose ends, but it feels remarkably like nothing accomplished.