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Sandman, Band 9 - Die Gütigen

Sandman, Band 9 - Die Gütigen

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Sandman, Band 9 - Die Gütigen

Bewertungen:
4/5 (1,265 Bewertungen)
Länge:
353 Seiten
2 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711693
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Der SANDMAN ist aus gutem Grund die am häufigsten gelobte und mit Preisen ausgezeichnete Comic-Serie der 90er-Jahre. Die intelligente, tiefgründige Story, elegant geschrieben von Neil Gaiman und abwechselnd illustriert von den gefragtesten Künstlern der Comic-Branche, bietet eine reichhaltige Mischung moderner Mythen und finsterer Fantasy, in der zeitgenössische Literatur, historisches Drama und Legenden nahtlos ineinander übergehen. Die Saga des Sandman enthält eine Reihe von Erzählungen, die in der neunten Kunst einzigartig sind, und die Geschichte als solche wird man nie mehr vergessen. Man gab ihnen viele Namen: Die Erinnyen. Die Eumeniden. Die Dirae. Die Furien. Die Vollstreckerinnen der Rache sind unerbittlich und nicht aufzuhalten, sie ruhen nicht, ehe das Verbrechen, das sie sühnen wollen, mit Blut fortgewaschen wurde. An sie, an DIE GÜTIGEN, wendet sich Lyta Hall, als ihr Sohn Daniel verschwindet, und es ist Dream von den Ewigen, hinter dem sie her sind. Doch außer dem Kummer einer Mutter und ungezügelter Wut sind noch finstere Kräfte am Werk, und was sie in Bewegung bringen, wird am Ende ein Opfer erfordern, das größer ist als alles, was das Traumland sich träumen ließ. DIE GÜTIGEN ist das neunte Buch aus der 10-bändigen SANDMAN-BIBLIOTHEK. Die SANDMAN-Bücher können sowohl in der Reihenfolge ihres Erscheinens als auch einzeln gelesen werden
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711693
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is the celebrated author of books, graphic novels, short stories, films, and television for readers of all ages. Some of his most notable titles include the highly lauded #1 New York Times bestseller Norse Mythology; the groundbreaking and award-winning Sandman comic series; The Graveyard Book (the first book ever to win both the Newbery and Carnegie Medals); American Gods, winner of many awards and recently adapted into the Emmy-nominated Starz TV series (the second season slated to air in 2019); The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which was the UK’s National Book Award 2013 Book of the Year. Good Omens, which he wrote with Terry Pratchett a very long time ago (but not quite as long ago as Don’t Panic) and for which Gaiman wrote the screenplay, will air on Amazon and the BBC in 2019. Author photo by Beowulf Sheehan


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  • (4/5)
    This time the Sandman is in real trouble. The little son of a young woman has been kidnapped and she is persuaded of the blame of the Lord of Dreams. In search of her child, she meets The Three Furies, whose duty is practicing bloody revenge without a soupçon of pity. And so their next object will be the Sandman...
    But this is not the only story in this volume, which is at least twice as thick as the previous ones. Among other things, there is Lady Delirium looking for her dog; also there is Nuala and her unrequited love for The Sandman; we follow Loki's cruel fate and additional a young woman who is attending an acquaintance while a deadly disease – and to be honest: I don’t have any idea what kind of proportion is this tale to the main story. Like before at the last book I come to the same conclusion: I have to read the previous books probably once again ;-)
    The stories are devilishly good as usual. However, this time I quarrel with the drawings. They are rougher painted than the previous images, almost in a sort of cubist way which I don’t find that appealing as a basis for a graphic novel. It would be wonderful if in the next volume the illustrators return to the old drawing style.
  • (4/5)
    This was where the series started to go downhill a bit for me, but really only because I didn't want to see it end.
  • (5/5)
    I have read this book more times than I can remember since I bought it long ago. It is an excellent read. It is very entertaining and engaging, the artwork is excellent (especially the parts when Hypolyta is going insane), and the writing is some of Gaiman's best.
  • (5/5)
    SPOILERS AHEAD!!! SPOILERS AHEAD!!!Yes, yes. I'm behind. I finished The Kindly Ones this evening, and I still need to write about the last three books. Yikes! Maybe Sunday afternoon I'll have time to catch up.So, it's Sunday afternoon, and I'm catching up. :) The Kindly Ones was a tragedy of Shakespearean proportions, and I truly believe it will someday be regarded as such by people much more important than myself. Our basic plot: Dream has killed his son, Orpheus, and the Kindly Ones (the Furies) are now at liberty to pursue him because they are "allowed" to avenge blood debts. Hippolyta Hall (mother to Daniel) has her son stolen, and she blames Dream, despite the fact that Dream does not steal her son initially. She is the one who awakens the furies wrath against dream, and it only spirals downward from there. We also discover in this volume that Nuala is in love with Dream, and we see the reappearance of Thessaly as Larissa. She kind of falls in love with Dream too. Dream is one of those tortured souls that attracts women apparently. I wouldn't say I'm in love with him, but I can certainly see the attraction. So Dream dies, but Death spares him being tortured further by the furies. My favorite characters were definitely Matthew (the raven), Rose Walker, and Delirium. In some ways, Dream ceases to be a character in this book, but I'm not sure I could explain why. He just reacts to things rather than actually initiating action himself.This book was definitely less sad than it might have been without the preparation of the previous two books. Still, the end of a myth is sad no matter what, even if it's a myth we've only known briefly (just this month, in fact). I did keep hoping throughout that Dream wouldn't die. I know that's childish, but I don't think it's fair to expect my readings to be that different than the average person. I'm sad when Romeo and Juliet die too. I keep wishing that they will work it out differently no matter how many times I read the tale.Okay, so all that being said, I want to mention artwork. This volume was very "cartoony." I'm sure there's a technical word for this style of artwork, but I don't know what it is. The best way I know to describe is that the curves are more emphasized than the lines. It makes everyone seem less sinister and more innocent. There's nothing really hideous here: even the scene where "A makeshift barge made of dead flesh is slowly poled down a river of cold semen" becomes more about the words than the image this way. I normally really like cartoons, and I like that style of artwork. But, it definitely does not do the horror genre as well as some others. For the first time since reading this series (a pitfall of having several different artists), I felt like I was reading an illustrated story rather than a graphic novel. However, this is also the first book I've read in which I've found panels that I would blow up and hang in my bedroom...actually, I might just do that. It could be my next art project :).I'm thinking about writing a longer blog on the series as a whole. I want to discuss this issue of dying mythologies at length, and it doesn't really fit with the purpose of these individual "reviews," if that's even what they can be called. We'll have to see if I make time to do it.
  • (5/5)
    Once again Gaiman is on his mark, as the writing and overall story is amazing. The artwork? Not so much. This is easily the poorest illustrated volume in the Sandman series. But the story is strong enough to not only make the reader feel depressed, but also feel hopeful with the next volume.Three minor, supporting characters really shine in this volume - Matthew, The (new) Corinthian and Lucifer. These three characters alone have enough emotion to interest many people, and combined with the overarching story they really shine.Again, the writing is top-notch Gaiman, and the storyline is fantastic. The artwork is at the very bottom of the series - but the writing alone makes up for the poor artwork. This is a volume that will change things for many people and should not be read unless many of the earlier volumes have been read.
  • (2/5)

    Seven out of ten. CBR format.

    Morpheus becomes the prey of the Furies, avenging spirits who torment those who spill family blood.

  • (5/5)
    I haven't written a review of the previous books in this series, because I was mentally treating them all as one bigger story. After reading this one, though, I needed to get my thoughts down. I've enjoyed the stories so far - interesting, slightly disturbing, and yet entrancing. It is really interesting to see the different artists and their portrayals of the characters across the different books and stories.I have to say that this was my favourite book so far (only two left to go). I knew what was coming, and it made the journey sad to read. The part that really struck me was that even though there were characters that had full faces and eyes and details and emotions (I'm thinking of Lyta, here), the artists did a phenomenal job of portraying the sadness and despair and strength of Dream without having to use details like eyes, etc. Very impressive, and beautiful. I'll miss him when I'm finished reading, but he is already entrenched in my psyche. After a night of bad dreams in my house, the first thought I had was that the Sandman was upset about something. It's great when a character has that kind of effect on your thoughts.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic, gripping, and heartbreaking as ever. When I first read this collection, I found the stylized artwork to be off-putting, but every time I re-read it I feel even more strongly that it was an appropriate and artistically inspired decision.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. I just finished The Sandman Volume 9: The Kindly Ones and my mind is still in a whirl. Don’t let the title fool you, this volume is one of the darkest yet. Except for the side story of Delirium searching for her lost dog which was charming, the rest of the book took us to the depths of Dreaming.Reviewing this volume is difficult without putting spoilers in, but rest assured that Neil Gaiman has brought his series full circle. This is the thickest volume in the series and the pace is exceedingly fast, but the chaotic story is both a nod to the past and a path to the future. Be ready to get reacquainted with just about every character that ever graced a Sandman tale. The way these characters are brought back and fit seamlessly into the story is incredible and a nice reward for those of us who have followed the story from the beginning. I felt that in this issue many threads from previous volumes were laced together but in true Gaiman style, there are still unanswered questions and avenues to explore. The Kindly Ones augments the legend and assures the reader that the dream continues.
  • (5/5)
    this was loaned to me back in high school and i could not stop reading it once i picked it up. even though its not the first book in the sandman series, its the book that introduced me to it.
  • (4/5)
    Neil Gaiman is one of those authors that hit super stardom. This is the series that launched his career, and I think his best work.This is the second to last book of the series. We find Dream in a bit of a funk, trying to figure out what what has changed, with him, since his escape in volume 1. The story takes a much darker tone, when a series of events sends the Kindly Ones (aka furies) after him.I know that Neil Gaiman seems to get most of the credit in these graphic novels, the writing is fantastic, but without the illustrations, it would fall flat. The different styles can be a bit distracting, but the characters all drawn in a similar, recognizable way.This is a sad volume. It covers topics of death of children, mental illness, revenge, and death. A lot of characters die in this volume. The ending is melancholy, with themes of rebirth and redemption.I highly recommend this series, but don't start with this one.
  • (5/5)
    Neil Gaiman's The Sandman reaches its zenith in The Kindly Ones, in which Morpheus, the Lord of the Dreaming, comes to grips with the events that precipitated the entire series. Gaiman returns to many of the side characters that have populated his world, weaving their stories back into that of Morpheus even as the Kindly Ones (or the Furies or the Fates) weave lives. The denouement transcends the previous stories to create something both new and familiar. The artwork feeds the story just as much as Gaiman's writing, with powerful visuals that subtly illustrate ever-building tension leading to the inevitable climax.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent. The best of all of them I believe. Storylines, art, the whole bundle.
  • (5/5)
    This was probably the richest and deepest of the Sandman comics. Its also basically the 'last' and 'end' of the Sandman comics. Gaiman does a perfect job of leading up to what is the inevitable conclusion to this with the previous few volumes, and enough moments from the first volumes to give it a 'ending'. In the same sense that most finales on TV shows have a scene or two with characters from all seasons (like Seinfeld's court scenes using every character from the show, LOST highlighting characters from Seasons 1 and 2 in the flash-sideways, etc.). Subtle hints at old characters, old characters having moments, nods to this or that theme or event that happened previously in Sandman.

    This was also the longest of the graphic novels (in the Sandman series) and there is a lot to this to unpack. A lot of themes, and a lot of mythos and world building (or ending?). Some things feel a little unnecessary but they do tie in in a very round-about way.

    I'm not a huge fan of the art in this volume, its not as realistic and doesn't look as exact as some past volumes, but it's still enjoyable and doesn't ultimately detract from the story, which is the primary focus of the series. As Gaiman is an excellent storyteller and this is a perfect example of that.
  • (5/5)
    First, a warning: Don't read the introduction of this book if you haven't read the book yet. Here there be spoilers.What an incredible denouement to the Sandman story arc. Characters long since forgotten appear again with new significance. Elements from every preceding volume suddenly tie together in unforeseen ways. It's exciting and inevitable yet nonetheless surprising. The art took me aback at first. I didn't quite like it. I didn't hate it, but it definitely didn't appeal. However, as I sank deeper and deeper into the story, it grew on me, and in the end, I can't imagine this book drawn any other way.
  • (5/5)
    This is the ninth book in Gaiman's Sandman series. It was a wonderful installment, many things from the previous volumes come together and come to a climax.This story mainly focuses around a woman name Lyta (Hippolyta) was had her son kidnapped and then enlists the help of the Furies in revenging him. She has been led to believe (wrongly) that Morpheus is responsible for her son's fate and swears to revenge her son. This touch's on Nuala's story and Thessaly plays a main role too (the witch from A Game of You).This was a great story and really brought together a lot of threads introduced in previous novels. Morpheus is depressed by the outcome of his search for his brother Destruction and the Dreaming is suffering. In its depleted state the Dreaming is vulnerable to the attack of the Furies and many of the key characters in the Dreaming face their demise.This isn't the most uplifting book in the Sandman series, but it was a complex and interesting story. Morpheus is more human in this story than any others and you get to see deeper into his character. I loved it and continue to absolutely love this series. The stories are so well told, so creative, and so engaging.The artwork throughout is varied, as many different artists contribute to the Sandman installments. In general it is high quality and matches the mood of the novel; although it is definitely 80's-ish at points.Overall another excellent addition to this series. I thoroughly enjoyed it. I can't wait to see how the series is wrapped up in the final Sandman volume, The Wake.
  • (4/5)
    makes you wonder what makes them the Kindly Ones, doesn't it?
  • (5/5)
    The zenith and climax of Gaiman's epic--a masterpiece of words and images.
  • (5/5)
    While most would agree that The Sandman is one of the most critically acclaimed comics series, which volume is 'best' is highly subjective and debatable. But The Kindly Ones is far and away my personal favorite, as well as my favorite comic, and possibly my favorite book, ever, at all. Gaiman's decision to write it as a Greek tragedy gives the entire story a heavy overcast, which seems to part like storm clouds in the sun at the conclusion.Obviously, one should read the first eight books in the series before The Kindly Ones. But I find myself always comparing it to an actual Greek tragedy, as if, in some grim dystopic future, this volume is all that is left of The Sandman, and the back story is known only through reviews and reference (as we have so few extant Athenian tragedies).These are the best circumstances I can think of for reading this one out of order. But whether you learn the back story though the other volumes, or a summary in a distant future where all libraries went down like Alexandria somehow, this is one of the most highly recommended books I can think of.
  • (5/5)
    dense, but well worth it. all the themes and tribulations and everything else in Sandman in one solid punch.
  • (3/5)
    While still displaying the excellent art and writing of the other Sandman issues, this one was a little disappointing. I found the plot to be much more tedious and somewhat weaker than in some of the other graphic novels such as "A Game of You" or "Season of Mists". Also, this is probably the first of the series that would have made absolutely no sense if one had not read the other previous stories. It's still a good story, still certainly worth reading, but just not Gaiman's strongest.
  • (5/5)
    Lyta Hall calls the Furies - who prefer to be called the Kindly Ones - down upon Dream.While I do feel that the series peaked with Brief Lives, this is still a damned gorgeous book. The art is quite different this time around; it's more stylized, and has almost a cartoonish look to it. The colour scheme is much brighter than that of previous installments. The production values have really gone up in the years since the comic debutedStory-wise, this is very good stuff. There are about fifty million things going on, and each and every one of the many subplots contains the perfect amount of explanation and tantalization. There are a few rare, wonderful moments where Gaiman spells it out for the reader, but they're often over so quickly that you'll miss 'em if you blink. (Metaphorically speaking). The text and the illustrations alike are absolutely loaded with meaning, and there are often three or four different ways to interpret what you've read. It's really up to the reader herself to piece together exactly what's gone down. Six readings on, I'm quite certain I know what happened... but I admit that my views could change with the next reading. I've noticed new things each and every time I've finished this book, and I don't expect Reading #7 will be any different.Highly, highly recommended, but I really think you should read the first eight volumes beforehand. Get to know these characters and their world. And for god's sakes, don't read the introduction if you've remained spoiler free!!!!
  • (5/5)
    Wow! I loved this volume. Definitely one of the best. It was very sad, but also expected. This series has really, really changed my mind on comics. I used to have no interest in them whatsoever, but this series has really made me rethink that. You CAN have good literature in comics...they're not all for pimple-faced teenage boys. This series is a joy. <3
  • (2/5)
    I didn't like Aeschylus's Eumenides, and I don't think Gaimain's retelling of the story added much to it; rather, I found Gaiman's sudden introduction of the Kindly Ones into the story to resolve Dream's story arc a major cop-out. The artwork was also grating to my eyes (particularly when compared to the beautiful drawings in the succeeding "The Wake". One more thing: DON'T read the introduction – it's got a MAJOR spoiler.
  • (5/5)
    The Kindly Ones is the heaviest of all the volumes, and the hardest to get through, because there's a lot packed into it and it's quite emotionally hard-hitting.

    As a story, it's pretty amazing. A lot of threads come together in this book and you can finally see where everything was going all along -- so many characters are revisited and their stories tie firmly into the whole. I especially liked the reappearance of the Corinthian, and Nuala's story, which I was anticipating but still got me right in the heart. We don't actually see Orpheus in this volume, but he's still behind everything that's happening, in a way -- and yet all you need to know is that he was Dream's son and Dream killed him. It's really amazing how all the volumes tie together and yet can be read alone.

    The art has changed a lot from the first volume, most noticably in this volume. In some ways, I like it a lot -- I particularly like Death and Delirium's character designs in this volume -- and in another way it's kind of jarring.
  • (1/5)
    my rating is a reflection of my inability to connect with most of the graphic novels even from an author I love!
  • (5/5)
    Wow! I loved this volume. Definitely one of the best. It was very sad, but also expected. This series has really, really changed my mind on comics. I used to have no interest in them whatsoever, but this series has really made me rethink that. You CAN have good literature in comics...they're not all for pimple-faced teenage boys. This series is a joy. <3
  • (5/5)
    In this, the final book about Morpheus (conluding ”The Wake”, is after all, both an epilogue and a new beginning) the trap is slamming shut. Dream’s mercy killing of his own son makes him rightful pray for the ghastly furies (though don’t go calling them that!). Poor old Lyta sets them in motion, even though what she wants revenge for is something else. This book is the crescendo of a classic tragedy, full of violent ends for characters we’ve come to love over the course of the series, and the inevitable, relentless unwinding of the clock of the greek drama. It’s both ruthless and tender, this conclusion, with more than one gasp moment.It’s rather remarkable how Gaiman manages to bring the whole thing together in this ending, bringing back characters and storylines from the whole series, and leaving very few loose ends. Like the preface (which you sholud avoid if you haven’t read this book before, as it is more than the usual spoilfest), I find myself wondering if Gaiman had the whole thing mapped out from the start, or if he just has a knack for finding brilliant solutions as he goes along. It’s been quite a while since I read this volume, and in my reread, what really stands out for me is Nuala’s story, and her tragic role in the final chain of events - typically while she’s just trying to help. It’s powerful stuff, and this is the character I’m mostly curious about what happens to in the future. Dream’s relationship with her is also the point (well, along with how he feels and acts around Orpheus) where it’s most evident the change our pale hero has undergone during this series. Compare the story of Nada, who at the beginning of the big arc is condemned to hell for eterntiy for not loving Dream back, to the gentle respect he shows Nuala – who loves him with the same unrequited love – at the end, despite what it costs him. Dream, in all his broody pompousness, has learned something during this incarnation, no doubt.I konw some of you disagree, but for me this is also the first Sandman book where the art truly matches the storytelling. Marc Hempel’s bold, angular style takes a while to get used to, but is very effective in both expressing big emotions and emphasising moods. I like it a lot, and also smile a bit at the few cameos made by Hempel’s own loveable Gregory on coffee mugs and t-shirts.This is a straighter story than most other Sandman books. Which might be seen as a minus, since the fiddling with layers is one of the sereis perplexing strenghts. But on the other hand Gaiman is juggling about a zilion balls here, and manages to finish with an elegant bow anyway. Aweinspiring stuff!
  • (5/5)
    In which Morpheus, the Dream King, the Sandman, is made (or causes himself) to face all the bad decisions he's ever made and receives a final visit from his big sister. This is the Greek drama of the series, with the Fates spinning the yarns of life and the furies as a chorus leading all the characters to an unavoidable end. Although not specifically said, it is evident that Dream sees where the story will end, since there are many ways in which he could avoid it, but he does not - he could have not heeded Nuala's call or he could have listened to Destruction.Much of the story is Daniel and Lyta's of course, but most of the characters that have appeared along the course of the overall story get to play a part in the drama. It has a complex structure, but Gaiman pulls it off in masterly way when he reintroduces those characters that have only appeared briefly in the past in a way that makes us remember them vividly. If you want a condensed version of the story, turn to Magda's story to Rose, a story of reaping what one sows and suffering the consequences of one's actions. At the end, it's Dream's epiphany that's the most poignant - he knows that had he acted in another way and had changed, things had been very different, but that was not in his nature and he needs to leave to give room to a Dream of the Endless that can, and will, be flexible and kind.Although a very sad installment (mainly because the story is getting so very close to its end), there is still a huge amount of room for the standard Sandman humor, like Barnabas telling Delirium, "I would feel infinitely more comfortable in your presence if you would agree to treat gravity as a law, rather than one of a number of suggested options," or Lyta Hall asking, after Medusa's sisters try to make her one of them, "Can I have some more water please? My hair drank most of it."Although, along with the others, the installment is a favorite of mine, the art of it is not, since it sometimes comes over as much too "cartoony" for its rather serious subject matter. In those instances that it matches up with the occasional levity of the story it is quite charming, though. This is actually one of the cases when I would have wished that more than one artist had been picked to provide the art. It's not by any means the worst in the series (hello, "Calliope"), so my complaint about it is mainly to provide a very tiny criticism.
  • (5/5)
    Wow, I don't know where to begin. The best Sandman book yet. Everything that I've read so far pretty much all wraps up in this, the longest of the Sandman collections. And it was worth the trip.

    If you ever want to read anything by Neil Gaiman that hits on all cylinders and emotions, this is it.