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Sandman, Band 2 - Das Puppenhaus

Sandman, Band 2 - Das Puppenhaus

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Sandman, Band 2 - Das Puppenhaus

Bewertungen:
4/5 (2,051 Bewertungen)
Länge:
233 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711488
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

SANDMAN ist aus gutem Grund die meistgelobte und mit Preisen ausgezeichnete Comic-Serie der 90er-Jahre: Die intelligente, tiefgründige Story, elegant geschrieben von Neil Gaiman und abwechselnd illustriert von den gefragtesten Künstlern der Comic-Branche, bietet eine reichhaltige Mischung moderner Mythen und finsterer Fantasy, in der zeitgenössische Literatur, historisches Drama und Legenden nahtlos ineinander übergehen. Die Saga des Sandman enthält eine Reihe von Erzählungen, die in der neunten Kunst einzig dastehen, und die Geschichte als solche werden Sie nie mehr vergessen. In DAS PUPPENHAUS findet Rose Walker mehr, als sie gesucht hat – lange verschollene Verwandte, den Kongress der Serienmörder und zum Schluss ihre wahre Identität. Der Herr der Träume versucht, das Geheimnis zu lüften. Nicht ahnend, dass ein anderer ganz in seiner Nähe die Fäden zieht. DAS PUPPENHAUS ist das zweite Buch aus der 10-bändigen SANDMAN-BIBLIOTHEK. Die SANDMAN-Bücher können sowohl in der Reihenfolge ihres Erscheinens als auch einzeln gelesen werden. "Ein einzigartiger, literarischer Comic, reich an Anspielungen, Humor, durchgeknallten Archetypen und einer gesunden Dosis Perversionen." The San Francisco Examiner "The Sandman ist Neil Gaimans persönliche Bestandsaufnahme der Bücher der Hölle, neu geschrieben und mit reichlich Ehrgeiz und Selbstsicherheit." Steve Erickson, L.A. Weekly
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711488
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is the celebrated author of books, graphic novels, short stories, films, and television for readers of all ages. Some of his most notable titles include the highly lauded #1 New York Times bestseller Norse Mythology; the groundbreaking and award-winning Sandman comic series; The Graveyard Book (the first book ever to win both the Newbery and Carnegie Medals); American Gods, winner of many awards and recently adapted into the Emmy-nominated Starz TV series (the second season slated to air in 2019); The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which was the UK’s National Book Award 2013 Book of the Year. Good Omens, which he wrote with Terry Pratchett a very long time ago (but not quite as long ago as Don’t Panic) and for which Gaiman wrote the screenplay, will air on Amazon and the BBC in 2019. Author photo by Beowulf Sheehan


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  • (3/5)
    The novel Coraline intrigued me so much, gave me such shivers, that I wanted to read more of Neil Gaiman. So what do I do? As a good librarian, I consulted my library catalogue and reserved a bunch of his books. This was the first tantalising selection that was available. I am not sure if it is sequential, but volume two reads well as a stand alone. I am not quite sure what to say exactly, as I am not well versed in graphic novels nor the horror genre. The premise was interesting- that their is a netherworld of the "dreaming" with nightmares that can escape into reality and, taking human form, create some pretty gruesome havoc. However, the illustrations were not as spectacular as the cover page would lead you to believe and the writing felt a little bit contrived at times. In terms of sheer horror, I would have to pick Coraline over the Doll's House, but that might be just my familiarity and comfort with the novel format rearing its ugly head.
  • (4/5)
    A young woman searches for her missing younger brother, unaware that she is drawing stray dreams and nightmares to her.Ask me to choose a favourite SANDMAN volume and you'll place me in a tricky position indeed, but I think this one might be it. As is the case with Preludes and Nocturnes, it's a fairly simple story that gains surprising depth when you consider it in light of the series as a whole. Gaiman really hits his stride here; he gives us a creepy, sometimes gory horror tale that also manages to be a personal story about a young woman and her complicated family dynamic. And man, are there ever some great graphic twists! The scene in which we slip from the waking world into Rose's dream is one of my very favourites. It draws the reader straight into the story; in order to follow along, we must physically alter the way we're reading the book. It's great stuff.The book can be read as a stand-alone, but it nevertheless adds a great deal to the whole SANDMAN mythos. We've already met Death, and we've heard mention of Destiny; now we meet Desire and Despair, two more of Dream's siblings. We also hear mention of Delirium and the mysterious, as-of-yet-unnamed "prodigal." Some events from the first volume play a role in this one, and we begin to get a feel for the ways in which all these stories are interconnected. I'm leery of saying too much for fear of letting spoilers slip, but you'll want to pay close attention to what's going on here. Look at how Dream is characterized, and consider which characters from the first volume have made repeat appearances here. Consider the exchanges between Desire and Despair, and between Desire and Dream. There's some great stuff going on here, and it astounds me that Gaiman, over the course of SANDMAN's eight-year run, managed to weave all these little bits and pieces into such a rich, meaningful tale.Highly recommended. You'll probably want to start with Preludes and Nocturnes, but it's not absolutely necessary.
  • (5/5)
    The first big story arc where we meet many new characters including some of Sandman's siblings. The storytelling is just remarkable and puts you in a state of not feeling worthy of reading its greatness.
  • (5/5)
    Like the first volume, this book was a joy to read. :)

    I really can't believe that I spent my whole life looking down on comics when there was stuff like this out there waiting to be read. I suppose I shall have to take the time to catch up now. :)

    The writing and the stories are creative, visionary and interesting, and the characters are fascinating. I really love the 'metaphysical' characters, or as Death says in the first volume "anthropomorphic personifications." Dream is still by far my favorite of them, although Desire was really...something. Still not exactly sure what s/he was trying to do, but hopefully we'll find out about that more later. :)

    Can't wait to read more!
  • (4/5)
    I'm working my way through a reread of these and they are just as enjoyable the second time through. If by "enjoyable" I mean disturbing, dark, gruesome, lurid, confusing, and yet still somehow lovely. And I guess I do.
  • (4/5)
    Volume II begins with a recap of everything that happened in the first volume. There’s a story set in the midst of a barren desert about a queen named Nada. She falls in love at first sight, but she can’t find the man who stole her heart.Then we move onto Rose the main character in this volume. She discovers her real grandmother is alive and well in England. She returns to America to search for her missing brother Jed. She moves into a boarding house with a collection of strange characters, Gilbert the landlord, Ken and Barbie, and two creepy sisters who collects spiders.We learn that Rose is actually a dream vortex and her presence is causing problems. While the people in the boarding house all dream very different dreams, but walls begin to break down and Rose's vortex merges their dreams. Meanwhile Morpheus is searching for the missing nightmares who escaped from the dream world while he was imprisoned. We also stop by a horrifying “cereal” convention. Without going into detail I’ll just note that this part was seriously scary.One of my favorite stories in this volume was about Hobbs, a man who wants to live forever. He meets Morpheus and the two decide to meet up once every hundred years. During that time they run into Shakespeare and other major historical events. I love that Morpheus, who is so lonely and distant, finally has a friend of sorts in Hobbs. Neil Gaiman always weaves mythology, religion, fables, and pieces of history together in such an interesting way. Nothing is off limits in his writing. I love that he uses all those elements in his stories. It’s the plot, not the illustrations that keep me coming back to these. Although I do love how every character’s thoughts and dialogue has a different font.BOTTOM LINE: Whenever I read one of the Sandman comics I struggle with how dark some of the content is. But when I get to the end I tend to love the overarching message, depth of character and the well-thought-out plot. I am glad that I got a more balanced taste of the Sandman comics instead of just stopping after the very first one, but I do think they are a bit too dark for me."Life as a human contains substance I never dreamed of in the dreaming, Lord. The little victories, and the tiny defeats."
  • (4/5)
    This lived up to my expectations as part 2 of the Sandman series. The character of the sandman is introduced further and some idea of his role in the world is given.I will read all of these. I love the dark twistedness of it.
  • (4/5)
    The Doll's House is the second book in Neil Gaiman's Sandman series detailing the activities of Dream. Dream is one of the Endless, along with his siblings Death, Desire, Delerium, Destiny, and Despair, they are essentially the embodiments of perpetual elements of human life.The story of this volume involves more of the fall-out from Dream's enforced absence from his realm that was detailed in Volume 1 as the sand man sets out to collect some wayward subjects of his realm. The focus character in The Doll's House is Rose Walker, a fairly ordinary seeming teenager who turns out to be more important than she realizes, and more important than even Dream realizes. The book explores what can happen when dreams are left to run amuck in the human world, essentially the flip side of Preludes and Nocturnes, which showed the dangers of humans having control of the power of dreams.The four missing dreams take different paths, one nightmarishly inspiring an army of horrific imitators, two aspiring to elevate themselves to power, but dealing with the very smallest of arenas, and third simply trying to discover what it means to be human. In between is sandwiched the story of Hob, a man who simply refuses to die, and as a result becomes Dream's friend, probably Dream's only friend.Eventually, the interference of the runaway dreams, the unique nature of Rose Walker herself, and the plotting of Dream's own relatives creates the crisis of the story. In the end, the sotyr turns out more or less happy, although several elements, such as the way Dream leaves the human attendees at the "Cereal" convention leaves much open to interpretation.This, like the other volumes in the Sandman series, is Gaiman at his creepy best. One can see, in graphic novel form, the ideas that spurred him to create American Gods. Gaiman mixes the etheral world of the Dream realm with the harsh reality of the real world, and adds to it a raw edge of harsh evil even beyond that to create a truly memorable story.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not going to bother with the plot of this book, it is ultimately as surreal and as disconnected as the very best of dreams. If you like linear easy to understand plots then this is really not for you. I loved it, and I can't wait to read the next in the series. So, if you are looking for something a bit different that rewards a little commitment and effort then give it a go.
  • (5/5)
    This is the best volume to start the series with. Except for the brilliant "The Sound of Her Wings," the first volume is rather lackluster and might fool people into thinking this series is something it's not. The Doll's House, though, is a great, fairly self-contained introduction to many of our main players in Sandman. It's creepy, surreal, fantastic, romantic, and thought-provoking. While you can read this volume without the first, you shouldn't move forward until you've read this.
  • (3/5)
    I've limited these novels to three stars for the dark content within, but I do enjoy much of the storyline. Very imaginative images and topics, and the homage to G.K. Chesterton was sweet. I like the way Gaiman plays with ideas and his characters are compelling, at least the ones which aren't repulsive are compelling.
  • (4/5)
    Gaiman grows the universe of the Sandman in the second volume, The Doll's House. Collecting Sandman issues 9-16, Dream resumes picking up his life and kingdom, attempting to recover several of the nightmares who left his kingdom during his absence - Brute, Glob, and the Corinthian. During his searching, Dream discovers another vortex in the dream-world, this one being a young girl named Rose Walker.Rose is looking for her younger brother, Jed, who she hasn't seen for many years. Jed, however, falls into the hands of the Corinthian, a serial-killer nightmare. The Corinthian is on his way to a serial-killer convention, and this is part of the volume is one of the reasons The Sandman is under the horror genre, as descriptions and depictions of the serial killers and the Corinthian are quite horrific.Part four (The 13th issue), Men of Good Fortune, is an interesting deviation from the other chapters, as Dream meets a man in a tavern in the 14th century who tells his friends he won't ever die because he thinks everyone else does it to fit in with the norm. Dream then offers the man a meeting, 100 years from that night, at the same bar. This continues for many meetings, each a century apart, and shows an interesting transition and growth in the man - and growth in the Sandman at the end.
  • (4/5)
    This is where the Sandman series really hits its stride. The Doll's House story line is entertaining, horrifying and amusing at the same time, and the stand-alone 'Men of good Fortune' is a wonderful interlude. The art work remains distinctive with its muted tones and shades. Excellent.
  • (1/5)

    Five out of ten. CBR format.

    Morpheus tracks down rogue dreams that escaped the Dreaming during his absence. In the process, he must shatter the illusions of a family living in dreams, disband a convention of serial killers, and deal with a "dream vortex" that threatens the existence of the entire Dreaming.

  • (5/5)
    This series just gets better and better. It is so imaginative and I can't wait to read the next volume.
  • (4/5)
    3.5 starsRose and her mother are flown to England and are in for a surprise when they arrive. Rose then heads back to the US to find her younger brother whom she hasn’t seen in seven years, since she was a teenager and he was only 5-years old. There is an odd convention happening. Rose’s story was the most interesting storyline for me, though there a bit more going on in addition to her story and the convention. I reread my review for Vol. 1 and found that my favourite parts in that volume were also about the humans; I didn’t find the Sandman parts as interesting, though he does intersect with Rose’s story. On thinking back, I thought I had rated Vol. 1 lower than what I did. So, officially, I rated both volumes “good”, but I feel like I liked this one better, at least as compared to what I remember of the first one.
  • (5/5)
    SYNOPSIS Rose's search for brother Jed leads to a confrontation between factions of Dreamtime which went rogue in Morpheus's absence. The consequences are larger than either the Corinthian or Brute & Glob seem aware. Morpheus continues his efforts to rebalance the Dreaming, but Desire & Despair have other plans. The Doll's House plotline accounts for the majority of Volume 2, supplemented by 3 sideline stories in which Gaiman explores some facet of Dream's character. The retribution plotline from Volume 1 shifts from Morpheus's captors to his rogue henchmen. IN THIS VOLUMEFrom the Endless: Dream Death Desire & Despair cameo by DestinyFrom Dreamtime / Supernatural: The Corinthian Brute & Glob Fiddler's Green (Gilbert) Lucien Witches (Three-In-One)From DC: Fury & Silver Scarab (Sandman) Matthew cameo by Constantine //Gaiman smuggles a new story into his introduction to the collected edition, Destiny's dramatic monologue a précis of Volume 1. In Volume 2, Gaiman dilates his storytelling lens in 2 vital ways:● In loosing four members from the Dreaming, we get new glimpses into how things work. Brute & Glob attempt to re-create the Dreaming, operating within Jed's solitary unconscious (and a traumatized prepubescent's, at that). The Corinthian, deliberately or not, inspires copycat behaviour by other humans, operating entirely outside the Dreaming. The efforts of Fiddler's Green are opaque until the very end, but prove no less insightful. ● In setting up a confrontation between Morpheus and the Vortex, we begin to see that the Dreaming is grounded in an integrated world of all human dreams --Jung's collective unconscious. The Dreaming lacks a vital integrity when either isolated (like Jed's) or collapsed (like the Vortex). And, Gaiman deepens his storytelling with layering and skeined plotlines, accomplished particularly through allusions --to myth, to DC storylines. This layering effectively adds depth and nuance not usually present in genre novels, whether the graphic or plaintext variety. If Volume 1 concerns human attempts to wield power over Dream, Volume 2 treats of entities of Dream attempting to wield power over humans. Neither scenario is good for us humans --nor, it would seem, for supernatural beings.Gaiman suggests Nightmares should not merely frighten: fear teaches, or is merely cruel, and dreams are nothing when only cruel. Though we have seen it thus far primarily in the sideline stories, dreams are more than Nightmare, too. I suspect that vein is to be mined in later volumes.//"The Story So Far"(concerning Morpheus and his abduction)Destiny relates the high points (with instructive commentary) of Volume 1. Endless revealed to be not Gods (who die when followers dwindle: Leiber?), but permanent anthropomorphized cosmological principles."The Sound of Her Wings"(concerning Morpheus's role as one of the Endless)In my edition, reprint of the identical story which closed Volume 1."Tales in the Sand"(an interlude, concerning the force & limits of storytelling)Sideline plot, a coming of age rite which relays a story about breaking the rules and serves as analogue for the reader."The Doll’s House"(concerning Rose Walker and her family, and their place in Dreaming)Rose is named as a Vortex, and the Three-in-One make a cameo appearance, this time as typecast witches."Moving In"(concerning the inhabitants of a house, a mirror twin of the one in Unity's room)Introduces Matthew, and four rogue denizens of Dreaming: Fiddler's Green, Brute & Glob, and the Corinthian. Fiddler's Green, a place imagined by humans, is here a character taking the persona of G.K. Chesterton: a visual pun on genius loci. The first appearance of Morpheus's tools since their recovery: here, his helm."Playing House"(concerning Jed Walker)Background: the threat & solace of Dream for the individual; Dream requisite to healthy human life. Hector (Silver Scarab) & a pregnant Lyta (Fury) are distorted by Brute & Glob to serve as the Sandman in Jed's isolated Dream. Brute & Glob use some form of Morpheus's dream sand. Morpheus reconnects Jed's Dream to the True Dreaming and punishes Brute & Glob, while laying claim to Lyta's unborn child."Men of Good Fortune"(an interlude, concerning long-distance relationship)Sideline plot, Morpheus persuades Death to grant immortality upon a roustabout, initially a joke only to be surprised at the difference empathy makes for friendship. Morpheus meets Shakespeare, leading to a story in Volume 3, and with Lady Johanna, looking back to a story in Volume 1."Collectors"(concerning the Serial Killers convention)Serial killers, despite their sociopathic behaviour and psychopathic beliefs, are recognisably human as demonstrated by their sociability, individuation, group affiliation, social affirmation, devotion to craft. Evidently theirs is a cautionary tale on the influence of guiding dreams. (Note only the Corinthian is a Nightmare; yet outwardly indistinguishable --apart from the eyes-- from human serial killers, when operating outside of Dreamtime.)"Into the Night""Lost Hearts"(concerning the Vortex and the rules of Dreamtime)Fiddler's Green, originally a place dreamt up by humans, here is a place dreaming of what it's like to be human. Among Morpheus's Nightmares, only Gilbert attempted to do something important with his dream power, and only Gilbert goes unpunished. Morpheus confronts Desire on the trap set for him: to kill Rose would have been to kill a member of the Family, since she was sired by Despair.
  • (5/5)
    The trouble is that this is better than the first one, but I don't want to rate the first one less than 5 stars because I love it. Can this one be 5 plus? The story is darker in this one. Grittier. The first one was easing you into the universe. The real storytelling starts here.
  • (4/5)
    Volume two of the Sandman saga features a young woman who is a ‘dream vortex’, unknowingly capable of wreaking havoc on all of humanity while they sleep, four people (ok three people and a place) who have escaped the world of dreams and entered the real world, and a convention of serial killers. It also introduces two more of the “Endless”, Desire and Delirium, who try to manipulate and ensnare their older brother Dream (Morpheus). My favorite parts were actually those that were a little offline of the main plot – the Prologue, telling of an ancient legend, and “Men of Good Fortune”, telling of a man who lives for centuries and makes an appointment to meet Morpheus every 100 years. (He also meets Shakespeare and others, so he reminded me of ‘Orlando’ but I digress). As with volume one, it’s good writing, dark in places, has nice artwork, and makes me want to keep reading.
  • (4/5)
    Further into the series. Some good ideas here. Liked the cereal convention episode. Disturbing stuff. On to number three.
  • (4/5)
    the series is definitely getting better as it goes along. i am more hooked now than i was after reading the first trade.
  • (5/5)
    The second collection of Sandman comics, THE DOLL'S HOUSE, is probably my favorite in the series. It tells the story of the aftermath of Dream's 70 years of imprisonment. Four of his dreams have escaped his realm, and he must track them down in the real world. He must also deal with a vortex in the Dreaming, which threatens to destroy the world and is personified in the young girl Rose Walker. Finally, this collection introduces three of Dream's siblings, Death (in the prologue, "The Sound of Her Wings"), Despair and her twin Desire, who in what appears to be an extreme case of sibling rivalry, attempts to manipulate Dream into killing his own blood kin.The stories told in this arc are as haunting as dreams. There is the story of an old love of Dream's, Nada, and what became of her, set on the site of an ancient African city. One of my favorite is a side story about a man who has decided not to die, and who meets up with Dream for a drink every 100 years. I also love the fantastically creepy Cereal Convention, which appears to be a rather mundane fan convention, except all the participants are serial killers. I really enjoy how atmospheric these comics are, how they make our mundane world seem like a place filled with hidden horrors and wonders. The boundaries between the Dreaming and our world are so thin that it seems like we can step right through.
  • (3/5)
    The continuations of [9347622::Preludes and Nocturnes], this collection groups together The Sandman comics #9-16. I've read many comments about the fact that the P&N leaves much to be desired and that the series kept improving over time, but I thought that the first 8 installations at least had the merit of being unusual and unexpected. In [6039::Doll's House] there were a few things I had a hard time to stomach, which I suppose I can't hold against Gaiman, since after all this series is meant to be horror, not exactly my favourite genre I must admit, but I can't say I'm tempted to continue on.
  • (5/5)
    Even better than the first volume, and even more surreal! This is a rampant imagination at its best, looking forward to reading the next volume. Particularly loved the 'Fiddler's Green' characterisation.
  • (5/5)
    This is where The Sandman really starts to hit its stride, and the groundwork is laid for events that will become important later on in the series. This was the first Sandman collection I ever read, so I have a lot of affection for it, even though it's not my favorite story arc.
  • (2/5)
    Minor plots sucked, not enough magic or magical creatures, didn't like serial Killers
  • (5/5)
    this one confused me more than the others, and i had to get it straight in my head just what exactly the Vortex is... absolutely spectacular nonetheless.. read it for the Cereal Convention.
  • (4/5)
    more tantalizing than the first, i liked the little section that was showing dream through history.
  • (4/5)
    These are interesting. I like the concepts and even the playfullness. I have to say though that I preferred Fray and the artwork in it.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, Neil Gaiman's genius at storytelling. Because this is exactly it, he doesn't really write books - he tells stories. And it has been long since I've decided that I don't really care what I read, or whether it is a book or a movie, so long as it is a good story. And Neil tells good stories. Already the first part, which is not entirely relevant to the story, adds so much, while it shows how people from a different culture perceive the Sandman. How they find him as creature that resembles them in appearance, which shows us a thing which we have always known, and that is that humans create their gods in their image, and if cows had gods, they would have been cow shaped and so on. The Sandman has captured me at the first book already (where John Constantine makes a guest visit, btw), there's just something sexy about him. A particularly nice story is the one about the man he meets every hundred years. I am definitely going to buy the rest of the books. The graphic design is genius, and I already gave my compliments for the text. 12.3.07