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Sandman, Band 3 - Traumland

Sandman, Band 3 - Traumland

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Sandman, Band 3 - Traumland

Bewertungen:
4/5 (1,790 Bewertungen)
Länge:
113 Seiten
47 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711518
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

SANDMAN ist aus gutem Grund die meistgelobte und mit Preisen ausgezeichnete Comic-Serie der 90er-Jahre: Die intelligente, tiefgründige Story, elegant geschrieben von Neil Gaiman und abwechselnd illustriert von den gefragtesten Künstlern der Comic-Branche, bietet eine reichhaltige Mischung moderner Mythen und finsterer Fantasy, in der zeitgenössische Literatur, historisches Drama und Legenden nahtlos ineinander übergehen. Die Saga des Sandman enthält eine Reihe von Erzählungen, die in der neunten Kunst einzig dastehen, und die Geschichte als solche werden Sie nie mehr vergessen. TRAUMLAND vereint vier packende Storys, die unter die Haut gehen. Die Geschichte über die Uraufführung von William Shakespeares Ein Sommernachtstraum gewann den World Fantasy Award. Die schöne Muse Calliope wird von einem jungen Schriftsteller gefangen gehalten, der Material für ein neues Buch benötigt. Die Tyrannei der Menschen, aus dem Blickwinkel einer Katze gesehen, ist das Thema der zweiten Geschichte, während die letzte von einer unsterblichen, unverwundbaren Frau handelt, die nichts anderes will, als tot sein. TRAUMLAND ist das dritte Buch aus der 10-bändigen SANDMAN-BIBLIOTHEK. Die SANDMAN-Bücher können sowohl in der Reihenfolge ihres Erscheinens als auch einzeln gelesen werden.
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711518
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is the celebrated author of books, graphic novels, short stories, films, and television for readers of all ages. Some of his most notable titles include the highly lauded #1 New York Times bestseller Norse Mythology; the groundbreaking and award-winning Sandman comic series; The Graveyard Book (the first book ever to win both the Newbery and Carnegie Medals); American Gods, winner of many awards and recently adapted into the Emmy-nominated Starz TV series (the second season slated to air in 2019); The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which was the UK’s National Book Award 2013 Book of the Year. Good Omens, which he wrote with Terry Pratchett a very long time ago (but not quite as long ago as Don’t Panic) and for which Gaiman wrote the screenplay, will air on Amazon and the BBC in 2019. Author photo by Beowulf Sheehan


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1790 Bewertungen / 44 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    A great set of stand alone stories between stories. Gaiman's writing shows it's strength and the artist' interpretations are wonderful.
  • (5/5)
    I love Neil Gaiman, and I love these graphic novels.

    From this one, I particularly liked "Dream of a Thousand Cats" - love love love. :)
  • (4/5)
    This was a nice break from the previous two. By that I mean that I didn't have to look at a lurid illustration of an eyeball getting eaten. Somehow, despite this lack of gruesome, I still felt moved by and invested in the stories. Amazing.
  • (3/5)
    A very mixed bag, even more confused and surreal than the first two books in the series. Each 'story' stands alone without creating a complete story arc and they are only vaguely connected by the presence of Dream. Still it's an interesting collection that will certainly reward future re-reading as it is far too rich in detail too fully absorb on one read.
  • (4/5)
    SPOILERS AHEAD!!! SPOILERS AHEAD!!!I caught a lot of crap this weekend reading my graphic novel around a bunch of veteran comic book readers. Apparently, I am not to read the introductions, and it is absolutely ludicrous that I would read the published script at the end of Volume 3. It was an interesting reading environment; I am a very vocal reader, and when something is funny, I laugh out loud. When something is strange, I read it aloud to make sure it makes sense to me. The guys were quite amused I'm sure. In any case, I digress.Dream Country was unlike the previous two Sandman books because it was really a collection of short stories in which Dream makes an appearance rather than chapters in a story about Dream. The first story, "Calliope" was about a muse that had been captured by one famous author and given to another in order to inspire further best sellers. I enjoyed this story because I aspire to write, and I can certainly sympathize with the frustration the authors feel when they have no ideas. However, the really sad part of the story is the complete lack of respect both authors have for the muse. The one who captured her refers to her as a cow, and the one who obtains possession during the story rapes her and doesn't even feel guilty about it. Dream rescues her by cursing the latter author with a plethora of ideas, which he finds so all encompassing that he has to write them on the walls with his own blood in order to get them out.Incidentally, this is also the story for which the script is provided in the back of the book. It was really interesting to see how the artist, Kelley Jones, interpreted Gaiman's words. Gaiman's comments were really amusing too. At some point, he randomly apologized for being too tired to finish a certain number of pages in a night. He also makes several wry comments mid explanations. The script was quite long: several pages longer than the actual story. My boyfriend made the comment that perhaps the bloated scripts were one reason The Sandman series has a new artist for every book. I think not, but whatever.The second story features felines as the main characters, and it left me a little cold. I wanted the cats to change the world with their dream, as the afflicted cat promised their concurrent dreaming would. However, I guess I see the validity in the idea that cats cannot agree on anything and are therefore incapable of community action. Still, I think from the fantasy aspect, the story would be more subversive if the cats actually did manage to change the world. A theme that seems to be running through the books is that though things never happened, they can still be true. And in this case, our imaginations simply have to make the alternate universe true for the cats.The third story is the one about Shakespeare that seems to have attracted a great deal of critical attention. The writing was actually mostly Shakespeare's, and the twist to the story was that the actual characters were the audience. Once again, Gaiman seems to be playing with the idea of truth. The truth of the actual characters validates the truth of Shakespeare's version of human nature. It was interesting. I like the completely fictional idea that Shakespeare's son Hamnet hangs out with him for a while though. It increases my respect for Shakespeare as a man, even though I know it is completely untrue.The fourth story featured a character that I knew nothing about, and I really didn't find it that interesting, except that Death showed back up, and I like her. Rainie, or Element Girl (?), longs for death because she can no longer function in society. She goes out to lunch with a friend and loses her fake face she has put on for the occasion. Death leads her in the right direction for suicide, and it was a little touching maybe. But mostly, I was just interested in what her body was made of. I am sure that there is a running theme through traditional comics about the inconveniences and difficulties of being superhuman, but this story really didn't wrench my heart the way it could have.So, back to introductions (I'm tacking this on at the end--can you tell?) I did not enjoy the introduction to The Sandman: Dream Country as much as I enjoyed the previous intro (The Doll's House), but Steve Erickson did provide a nice anecdote about a dream he had about his father shortly after his death. I liked the previous intro because it was all about fantasy, and that is really my thing. And, so far, Dream Country is my least favorite of The Sandman series because I like Dream, and I missed him. Thank goodness I have another seven to read.
  • (3/5)
    My heart is torn on this one between three and four stars. I loved two of the stories and found the other two very interesting and compelling, but the content is such that I couldn't recommend it to most of my friends, and I didn't enjoy that part either. I don't understand why the focus on the horrible things people do to each other and the graphic portrayal of it makes it worse for me. I probably won't read more of these, or only selected stories because I really don't care to have those images in my mind and they are hard to get out. It's too bad, because I love the idea of the stories of The Sandman and his sister, Death.
  • (4/5)
    The third Sandman volume, Dream Country is a collection of short stories following the Doll's House arc. While there is no overarching story arc in the collection, there is of course a sense of relevance as each part develops the Sandman's universe and other characters - especially his sister, Death, in the final part.Included with the set is an interest bonus - a copy of the script for one of the parts (Calliope). Neil introduces is as merely an example of one script, for one issue, in one comic series by one author. It is a fun little bonus, and he likens it to the curiosity of a magicians show - while it may ruin the illusion for some, most people have an insatiable, unquenchable thirst to see how it is done.As always, the artists change from story to story, or at least every few stories, offering different artistic styles that enhance each story and make them even more unique. This works particularly well in a collection such as this, where each story is really its own separate story.
  • (3/5)
    Neil Gaiman has written that upon completing the Doll's House story arc he wanted to do some stand-alone short stories, hence the collection of 4 stories in this third volume of the complete Sandman Collection. One of these stories (A Midsummer Night's Dream) won the World Fantasy Award, but personally none of the storys here really stood out for me. Interesting, entertaining, bizarre, but not outstanding.
  • (2/5)

    Four out of ten. CBR format.

    This volume contains four independent stories. The imprisoned muse Calliope is forced to provide story ideas, a cat seeks to change the world with dreams, Shakespeare puts on a play for an unearthly audience, and a shape-shifting immortal longs for death.

  • (3/5)
    I still really enjoy this series. My least favorite of the bunch was the Midsummer's Nights Dream. I am not that fond of Shakespeare, so I think that prejudiced me. The cat episode was cute, and thought provoking for me. I plan on continuing with this series and am excited to move on to book 4.
  • (4/5)
    SYNOPSIS Four stories, unrelated either to one another or to earlier narrative arcs. The first three serve the same role as did interludes in the preceding volumes, expanding on some aspect of Morpheus's character and/or the workings of the Dreaming. The last revisits an old DC character and features Morpheus's sister, Death; Morpheus himself doesn't appear at all.IN THIS VOLUMEFrom the Endless: Dream DeathFrom Dreamtime / Supernatural: Calliope & the Camenae (Three-in-One) Robin Goodfellow (Puck), Auberon, & Titania Skarrow, Peaseblossom, & a Blue Faerie Ra (Sun God)From DC: Element Girl (Urania Blackwell)//Revelation? That is the province of Dream.Gaiman's script for "Caliope" is reproduced as an appendix of sorts. An interesting insight into a the creative act, as such glimpses always are. Here Gaiman includes a reference to Cabell for a fictional book title, but doesn't note that the Madoc name is borrowed from him (and so, maybe it isn't). The theme of "Thousand Cats" bears a striking resemblance to Cabellian Romance, as well.In a prefatory note to the "Calliope" script, Gaiman observes it was a combination of creative pause between more complex Sandman story arcs, and creative outlet for stories that weren't fitting "Doll's House", that accounts for the stand-alone stories in this volume. Note the separate story titles each refer back to dream, in some way.I expect these first 3 volumes are a solid demonstration of what Sandman does over the full series.//"Calliope"(concerning two men who imprison a Muse)Calliope and the Camenae refer to him as Oneiros, not Morpheus. He and Calliope have a son, yet their personal history does not prepare her for his intervention on her behalf. Gaiman names his protagonist Madoc, perhaps for the Welsh Prince said to have sailed to the Americas in 12th Century (and treated in Robert Southey's poem), but I thought first of the poet in Cabell's "The Music from Behind the Moon". Gaiman's character doesn't appear to share any particular trait or circumstance of any of these personages, literary or historical. "A Dream of a Thousand Cats"(concerning non-human dreamers)Strong implication the Dreaming is Collective Unconscious for more than humans, and that Morpheus's typical appearance reflects his human audience rather than any definitive form."A Midsummer Night's Dream"(concerning the departure of the Faerie)Morpheus confirms to Auberon his arrangement with Shakespeare is designed to ensure humans remember the Faerie folk. If Morpheus agreed to inspire two plays, what is the second? Perhaps Hamlet, based upon Shakespeare's son Hamnet, who has a small part in this story."Façade"(concerning the isolation of a superhero)Ask, and you shall receive.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed these four self-contained Sandman stories. This collection includes "Calliope," one of the most memorable stories from the series. That alone is worth the price of admission, but the other tales are good too.
  • (4/5)
    *Book source ~ LibraryFrom Goodreads:The third book of the Sandman collection, DREAM COUNTRY continues the fantastical mythology of Morpheus, the King of Dreams. In these centuries-spanning tales, the powerful entity known as the Sandman interacts with a diverse assortment of humans, fairies, heroes, and animals as he walks the mortal plane. Including an amazing encounter with William Shakespeare and an interesting take on the origin and first performance of "A Midsummer Night's Dream," this book depicts the dreaming world of cats, the tragic life of forgotten super-heroes and the folly of imprisoning and torturing a former lover of the King of Dreams.I actually didn’t like this one as much as the other two volumes I’ve read, yet I still give it a 4 for creativity, weirdness and artwork. I like Calliope’s story the best and A Midsummer Night’s Dream the least because it doesn’t make any sense to me and I’m really not a fan of Shakespeare. I only flipped through the script for Calliope because while it was interesting, it wasn’t so interesting I wanted to take the time to read it all.In this volume:Calliope ~ Poor CalliopeA Dream of a Thousand Cats ~ Very bizzareA Midsummer Night’s Dream ~ Shakespeare, Neil Gaiman-styleFaçade ~ Weird and a bit disturbingScript for Calliope ~ behind the stage of how this comic was written and drawn
  • (4/5)
    Another good tradeback of the Sandman comics. Not quite as interesting as the Doll House (vol. 2) but some interesting stories. The Calliope muse start was kind of interesting, and its always an interesting subject (to me anyway) when authors describe and do stories about authors (which they all tend to do at some point.) The Shakespeare interlude story was a bit dull (possibly because I don't have a very intimate knowledge of Shakespearean lore and canon).
  • (3/5)
    This third volume of Sandman comics didn't really make much of an impact for me. All of the tales are pretty dark and while I enjoy any appearance from Death, her presence in only one story included in this collection didn't nudge up my appreciation for it. Definitely an entry you could skip if you're not a completist. I hear rumours there's better things waiting for you in other volumes.
  • (4/5)
    I took a break from flying through Discworld books and read this. The introduction describes it as a bridge between volumes 2 and 4, and it did feel like Dream was off doing important things while we paid attention to some plain old humans. But somehow Gaiman made that interesting and I didn't even wonder too much about the Endless. I'm looking forward to volume 4!
  • (5/5)
    Thus far, this one has my favorite issue - "Facade". Death gets her own story for the first time here, and she is by far my favorite character in The Sandman universe.
  • (4/5)
    This is an anthology of four excellent stories dealing with the actions of Dream in the affairs of humans. 1) Calliope: The muse is the captive of a 1980's writer, a man so desperate for ideas that he is willing to do an Ariel Castro on a being that looks like a woman. She is rescued by her ex-lover, Dream, who gives the writer more ideas than he can handle. A rather distasteful story of artistic desperation destroying the roots of its inspiration.2) A Dream of a Thousand Cats: A mad Siamese cat roams the Earth, preaching to any of her fellows that will listen to her, urging them to dream of a world where cats rule, for if a thousand cats do, their dreams will become real. A grim reminder of what we do to our pets, and what they may want to do to us.3) A Midsummer's Night Dream: Will Shakespeare made a pact with Dream, a pact that involves the inspiration for two plays. Now, in an English dale on a summer night, he and his troupe perform his great comedy for Dream and Dream's guest audience - the originals behind the characters. Dream does this so the disappearing fay may be remembered for another age - and sighs that Shakespeare, a cold and distant father to his son Hamlet - cannot guess what the price for inspiration for the second play will be.Façade: Urania Blackwell gained immortality and superpowers from the god Ra. Now she has lost her looks and takes no consolation from her abilities and prays for Death. Who pays her a visit, since she happened to be passing by, and gives her sound advice.
  • (3/5)
    The third installment in the Sandman series is a disappointment, much shorter than the first two volumes, and uninspired. It’s as if Gaiman was experiencing the writer’s block the character in his first story has. That character unblocks himself by acquiring the ageless Calliope, one of the Muses, and I was not wild about the casualness with which Gaiman describes him raping her on their first night. The second story goes a long way to use the line at the end about it not being possible to get a thousand cats to agree to anything. The third story has faeries visiting Shakespeare and company and having them put on a performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which is not all that original. The lone highlight was the character ‘Death’ in the last story, who, far from the traditional grim reaper, is a youthful looking woman who does her job in a friendly and reasonable way. Overall not horrible, but this one could have been skipped.
  • (4/5)
    I liked these four stand alone stories before what I imagine will be the next story arc in the series. Enjoying them. Midsummer was very ambitious!
  • (3/5)
    This one was a bit more enjoyable for me. More than the second, less than the first. I'm having a hard time getting into this series, but I'm told "just wait". So I'm doing just that.
  • (4/5)
    this is the first graphic novel i've ever read and i was pretty pleased with it. very dark tones to it but it wouldn't be gaiman if it didn't have that.
  • (5/5)
    A collection of shorter stories. I really love "A Midsummer Night's Dream."
  • (2/5)
    Cool faeries in one story and the script thing was interesting. The 3rd story sucked bad the others were just ok.
  • (5/5)
    some of the most excellent, creative, and woahing short stories you'll ever come across.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't like this one as much as the first two so far, however the reinterpreting of midsummers night dream, and a thousand cats was really interesting and thought provoking.
  • (5/5)
    [close] This volume is, of course, as delicious as any other Sandman, but is a bit dissapointing. It is very thin, compared to the rest, and almost half of it isn't part of the comic at all, but the script for the first story of this volume, together with Neil's and other people's notes on it, which is kind of cool, but I would much rather they have put more stories there. My favourite story in this volume is the one about the cats. I always knew they ruled the world sometime, they sure do act like it :)
  • (4/5)
    YES, this is perfect. Two of the most memorable Sandman issues are in this collection: A Dream of A Thousand Cats, and A Midsummer Night's Dream. These two are amazing, and you have to actually read them to get how amazing they are.
  • (4/5)
    Four short stories set within the SANDMAN mythos.This is a pretty solid collection. It's short, but the stories pack a punch. My favourite is, without a doubt, "A Midsummer Night's Dream." I'm a huge fan of the play, and I love what Gaiman and Vess did with it. The pacing is lovely, the humor is spot-on and the art is superb. It's a gorgeous production from start to finish, and is certainly worth of the World Fantasy Award it won.The rest of the stories are also quite good. "Calliope" adds to Dream's backstory even as it spins its frightening tale. "A Dream of a Thousand Cats" plays off the idea that the world can change without our involvement. It's sure to appeal to cat lovers. Finally, "Facade" provides the reader with a welcome reunion with Death.Dream himself has only a peripheral presence in these tales, but they still do a fair bit to flesh out the story as a whole. Through them, we gain further insight into the world the Endless inhabit. Events that play out here are certain to reverberate down through the rest of the series.Highly recommended. Despite its position as the third volume in a longer series, it can easily be read as a stand-alone.
  • (3/5)
    This one is a collection of stories with Sandman at the core of each one. MY favorite story is Caliope about a woman who is captivated by a writer since she helps him fend off writer's block. Another intriguing story is about William Shakespeare (unsurprisingly named as 'A Mid-Summer Night's Dream' - I believe it would take a second reading of the story to absorb all the nuances.

    Also, there is a rare prize hidden in this issue - Neil Gaimon's comic script for the story Caliope. I had great fun comparing script with the comic as it panned out and to read his notes and graphic descriptions.