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Sandman, Band 7 - Kurze Leben

Sandman, Band 7 - Kurze Leben

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Sandman, Band 7 - Kurze Leben

Bewertungen:
4/5 (1,327 Bewertungen)
Länge:
257 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711631
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

SANDMAN ist aus gutem Grund die meistgelobte und mit Preisen ausgezeichnete Comic-Serie der 90er-Jahre: Die intelligente, tiefgründige Story, elegant geschrieben von Neil Gaiman und abwechselnd illustriert von den gefragtesten Künstlern der Comic-Branche, bietet eine reichhaltige Mischung moderner Mythen und finsterer Fantasy, in der zeitgenössische Literatur, historisches Drama und Legenden nahtlos ineinander übergehen. Die Saga des Sandman enthält eine Reihe von Erzählungen, die in der neunten Kunst einzig dastehen, und die Geschichte als solche werden Sie nie mehr vergessen. In KURZEM LEBEN bringt Delirium, die Jüngste in der Familie der Ewigen, ihren Bruder Dream dazu, ihen verlorenen Bruder Destruction zu suchen. Die anschließende Odyssee durch die Wachwelt und die tatsächliche Begegnung mit Destruction - ebenso wie Dreams Schlussstrich unter die schmerzhafte Beziehung zu seinem Sohn Orpheus - werden die Ewigen für immer verändern. KURZE LEBEN ist das siebte Buch aus der 10-bändigen SANDMAN-BIBLIOTHEK. Die SANDMAN-Bücher können sowohl in der Reihenfolge ihres Erscheinens als auch einzeln gelesen werden
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711631
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is the celebrated author of books, graphic novels, short stories, films, and television for readers of all ages. Some of his most notable titles include the highly lauded #1 New York Times bestseller Norse Mythology; the groundbreaking and award-winning Sandman comic series; The Graveyard Book (the first book ever to win both the Newbery and Carnegie Medals); American Gods, winner of many awards and recently adapted into the Emmy-nominated Starz TV series (the second season slated to air in 2019); The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which was the UK’s National Book Award 2013 Book of the Year. Good Omens, which he wrote with Terry Pratchett a very long time ago (but not quite as long ago as Don’t Panic) and for which Gaiman wrote the screenplay, will air on Amazon and the BBC in 2019. Author photo by Beowulf Sheehan


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  • (4/5)
    It is the first Sandman series in which the Endless play the main role. Delirium, Dreams sister, longs for her brother Destruction, who has left the family of the Endless 300 years ago - no one knows where he is. After Desire and Despair refused helping delirium in her search, she turns to Dream, who will surprisingly stand by her. However due to selfish reasons: Just left from his beloved, he is hoping to think of other things and maybe, in secrete, to meet her once again ...
    I have to admit, that this Sandman series left me behind with mixed feelings. On the one hand it is a story that is unique to sense and serious thoughts about the uniqueness and finality of life in this form, on the other hand there are so many references to previous volumes, that I am constantly asked myself, what was happening before, who are these persons, don’t I know them, etc. Unfortunately, between my readings of each book there are longer periods and not all is still present, so I think my reading experience was significantly diminished. Otherwise, the drawings are awesome as always, with some of them are almost be described as paintings.
    All in all, great reading material, but if possible, just read it in conjunction with the preceding books. And I, I have to read it again ;-)
  • (4/5)
    Great story arc in this volume. A great search and lots of really deep thoughts going on, especially at the end.
  • (5/5)
    Possibly my favourite of the Sandman series -- beautifully woven together, an engaging and exciting adventure story featuring the Endless at their best. This is certainly among the deepest and most intellectually exciting of the volumes. (Also, I heart Destruction. And Barnabas). Absolutely gorgeous work, all the way throught.
  • (5/5)
    The best volume of the Sandman series yet brings Dream and his sister Delirium in search of their long lost brother Destruction. Destruction left the world of the Endless several hundred years ago to pursue his own life - ironically creating many things such as paintings, poems, sculptures and food.Along the way, Delirium and Dream run into many old acquaintances of Destruction, and naturally certain things happen to them...unfortunately in the search for Destruction, one of the repercussions is destruction of his old friends.Brief Lives is the most exciting and entertaining volume of the Sandman series thus far, shedding new light on his family and his development and growth. We see throughout the entire volume what strange musings Delirium has to offer, and perchance one of the most entertaining and likable characters thus far in the series in Destruction. His desire to create, combined with his sense of humor and his remarkably realistic laugh makes for an extremely likable character that won't be forgotten.Aside from the advancements of the characters of Delirium and Dream (and Despair), one thing not only evident from the volume itself but through remarks of various other characters is Dream's development. Each makes a comment that Dream has changed - including his own son, Orpheus - and it is clear by the end of the volume that Dream feels the same way.Gaiman does a wonderful job developing the Endless in Brief Lives, and has many remarkable comments about gods and dreams/destiny, including:"I know how gods begin, Roger. We start as dreams. Then we walk out of dreams into the land. We are worshipped [sic] and loved, and take power to ourselves. And then one day there's no one left to worship us. And in the end, each little god and goddess takes its last journey back into dreams...and what comes after, not even we know." (ch. 5, page 20)and"...while you [dream] are prince of those symbols and shapes that mean other than they seem, of metaphor and of allusion, my [destiny] dominion is that which is, of actions and consequences and paths." (ch. 6, page 9)All in all, Brief Lives provides the most in-depth, remarkable and fully entertaining volume of the Sandman series so far, with unique looks at various characters of the Endless and with excellent insights into the world of the Sandman - and our own world - by Neil Gaimain. Definitely not a volume to be missed.
  • (4/5)

    Seven out of ten. CBR format.

    Dream's erratic younger sister Delirium convinces him to help her search for their missing brother, the former Endless Destruction, who left his place among the "family" three hundred years before. However, their quest is marred by the death of all around them, and eventually Morpheus must turn to his son Orpheus to find the truth, and undo an ancient sin.

  • (5/5)
    'Brief Lives' has the most straightforward plot of any volume in the Sandman series so far. It is essentially a road trip story with Dream and Delirium travelling together in search of their estranged brother. Its simplicity makes it engaging and very readable. We spend less time exploring the myths and dreams of others and more exploring the mythos of the Sandman universe. Yet for all that, Gaiman still revels in the tangents and twists in the story. There are still the usual fascinating incidental characters who turn out in the end to be not as throwaway as they first seem. The focus is largely on what I imagine the majority of the Sandman's readers had been crying out for, more of The Endless. I was certainly delighted to spend more time with Dream's family, and was surprisingly attached to Delirium by the end of the volume.In keeping with the more straightforward story, we return to a single team of artists in this volume. The artwork in this volume is stunning and there are pages that are absolutely breathtaking. The book as a whole is beautiful and life-affirming, and is one of the best additions to the series.
  • (5/5)
    This might be one of my favorite volumes so far in The Sandman overture. The straight linear storytelling I enjoy a bit more than some of the more hectic or random or jumping narratives in previous volumes. I also love to learn more about the mythologies of the Sandman universe, especially in regards to the Endless ones, so getting to see more Delirium, Dream, Despair, Desire, and Destruction is great. Especially with how little this leaned on Death - given that Death plays most prominently among the non-Dream endless ones.

    I would love to see more of Destiny as well, but his character is a bit stagnant for storytelling purposes and limited.

    The theme of 'change' and how no matter how LONG a life is, that its still a 'brief' life is very interesting and poignant in this volume, and Peter Straub's introduction (that is more an aftermath since it was moved to the back due to being too spoilerish) is very good (possibly the best introduction/ending to any volume, outside of Ellison's).
  • (4/5)
    While every bit as well written as the rest of The Sandman, Brief Lives doesn't stand on it's own quite as well. Whereas the previous books are either a collection of shorts or a complete arc, this one is a segment of a much larger storyline, and as such doesn't quite reach closure.
  • (4/5)
    I don't ever want to see Delirium go off on a non-sensical tangent while Dream calmly looks on again. That's enough of that.Fun though, Morpheus matures a bit, we find out about Destruction finally. Keeps me interested enough to continue with the series, but these last couple seem not as stellar as the earlier ones. Still good.
  • (1/5)
    Why do I keep reading this series? Because I've invested too much time into it I guess and it's like reading a train wreck of pretension and bad writing. Delirium is one of the stupidest, shallowest characters ever created--if sad little tumblr girls were morphed into a character, it would be her. I think a comic book can be classified as actual literature/art, one day, maybe, possibly, but not today, and certainly not Gaiman's bilge.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great volume in the Sandman Series. We get Delirium, younger system to Dream, needing to find their missing brother, Destruction. I Loved this volume, Delirium is my favorite of the Eternals.
  • (5/5)
    This is my absolute favorite Sandman story arc. Dream is very human in this storyline. The story begins with him moping spectacularly, having been dumped by his latest lover: rain pours down as he stands dramatically on his balcony, while his servants and assistants discuss the best ways to stay out of his way until he's worked out his bad mood. A visit from Dream's sister, Delerium, serves to partially snap Dream out of his funk, and he joins her on a quest to find their prodigal brother, Destruction. Even this already complex task is going to be more complicated than anyone realizes, however, and the outcome will cement Dream's destruction.
  • (4/5)
    there is something ultimately literary about these works, and they ought be read as chapters in the new mythology.
  • (3/5)
    Good flowing beginning but not really any climax. No action. Wittier than the others. Bad handling of Orpheus.
  • (5/5)
    as beautifully unworldly as all the others. read them in order and learn why this is one of the greatest epics ever written. a quest for a missing brother, a journey of strange people in a strange land.
  • (5/5)
    Dream and Delirium go in search of Destruction.Every time I finish a Sandman volume, I think, "Wow. Okay. That one was definitely my favourite."Then I finish the next one in line, and I'm convinced that that one is definitely my favourite.But you know what? I'm a liar. No matter what I try and tell you, Brief Lives has absolutely got to be my favourite volume in this huge, detailed, utterly engrossing story.(At least, it is until I've finished The Kindly Ones. I think. Maybe).What don't I love about it? I adore the writing, of course. The art is lovely. The lettering continues to be a hidden treat. And the story! My god, is this ever a good story!I love the contrast between Dream and Delirium. I know she doesn't like people laughing at her, but so much of the back and forth between them makes me giggle. She's adorable and funny and utterly tragic. He's stern and grim, and despite Delirium's belief to the contrary I really do think he treats even her most random mumblings very seriously. They're complete opposites. He's tall, she's short. He's black and white, she's a riot of colour. He's collected, she's scattered. They compliment each other very well.And Destruction... well. He's spent the past three hundred years creating things, even though he's shite at it. (Assuming, of course, that his marvelously snarky talking dog can be believed). And even though he's abandoned his function, the story proves that he can't entirely be rid of it.The book comes together just beautifully. Every piece slots into place with an almost audible click. It's absolutely wonderful. I can't recommend it highly enough.I suppose you could read this as a stand-alone, but I really don't see why you' d want to. It's so much better when you've had the build-up, when you've spent six books wondering just what went down with Destruction, when you've watched Dream change in the aftermath of his captivity. I'm sure it's not a perfect book, but I'd be hard-pressed to tell you what its faults are. It's the sort of reading I hope and pray for.
  • (5/5)
    This volume was wonderful. Much better than the last - much more of the Endless too. These books are always best when they have plenty of the Endless in them. Delirium annoyed me a little, but her interactions with Dream were priceless. The message of this volume was also something that really got you thinking. Very enjoyable!
  • (4/5)
    SPOILERS AHEAD!!! SPOILERS AHEAD!!!These blogs are getting terribly long. I don't suppose that's the function of a blog. I better learn to keep it short! :) This is a problem with me with everything. I talk too much and I write too much! I'll try to keep this one shorter.Wow! Sad! I really liked this book, but the ending was sad and the introduction (it came at the end--haha) was really, really sad. The conclusion Peter Straub gleans from the book is that the Endless "are merely mythic patterns, and as such do not have the authority to interfere in human lives." Having read so far ahead at this point, I have realized that is Brief Lives that sets up this simple fact as Dream's hamartia (not hubris--people are always getting these confused). Dream's whole existence is based on his responsibility, for the dreamworld, for the dreamers, for the dreams and nightmares. He justifies his actions according to the rules he has created or inherited and set up as his purpose in life. And in many ways he needs Delirium to show him this truth, both literally and figuratively. The character Delirium with her childlike innocence can ask questions and make statements that Dream's rather left brained mind cannot fathom. She tries to lead him to a greater freedom by leaving his beaten path. There is definitely something to be said about the fact that Dream apologizes to Delirium on at least two occassions in this book, but he never manages to apologize for what he needs to apologize for.The plot of this book is quite unified and quite simple. Delirium decides she needs a change, so she goes to ask her siblings if they will help her seek Destruction, the prodigal brother. Destiny and Desire flat out refuse. Despair refuses slightly more gently. Death manages somehow not to get involved (she does have a job to do), and Dream ends up being the only of the Endless who is willing at all to help Delirium. The quest is multifaceted. Dream needs to get out of his morose mood; another lover has left him in mourning for his humanity (he cannot keep a lover because no woman (or man) can compete with his sense of responsibility as a quasi-god). As the story progresses he is also seeking some closure to the deaths the beginning of the quest incurs. Again he feels beholden to the mortals he has hurt. Finally the quest brings him back to unfinished business with his son Orpheus who he abandoned earlier in life. Orpheus manages to barter his death (which he has been seeking for a thousand years) for information about where Destruction is. Delirium gains Destruction's dog, Barnabus, and Dream returns to his castle to brood over his son's death.The story is very circular. It begins with Orpheus's guardian's cheerful acceptance and Dream's brooding, and it ends the same way. The highlight seems to be on the two different mindsets. When Dream returns to the Dreaming, he tells Lucien, "For the rest of today I will be retiring to my quarters. I do not wish to be disturbed." While he is dying, Andros muses, "It is going to be a beautiful day." Andros appreciates and accepts his brief life, while Dream has spent the majority of his (much less) brief life feeling sorry for himself. Dream is an interesting character. He always tries to do the right thing. Whenever one of his siblings tells him he has made a mistake, he sets off to correct it. But he never seems to get the point that the real joy comes from treating people (and gods or whatever) the right way the first time. I really like him. I like that he seems to have a sense of honor. When I said he behaves in a godlike fashion, I meant it. He definitely has a code of behavior that surpases that of the mortal world. It just doesn't seem to be enough, and it bothers me that even our gods are saddled with these eternal questions of responsibility to others versus responsibility to self, too much work versus too much play, the constant struggle for balance. Can't life be simple for anyone? It's very frustrating, but it must be a truth. I believe that truth comes from our representations. Truth does come to light with the creation of art. Sometimes though it doesn't make it any easier to swallow.On a happier note, I adore Delirium. I don't know if she is my favorite character, but I really, really like her. She is so cute about her "milk chocolate people:" "Have you got any little milk chocolate people? About threee inches high? Men AND women? I'd like some of them filled with raspberry cream." And when she drives: "I'm good at this, aren't I? I'm really good. I knew I'd be good at driving. Bzuum. Bzuum. Dream? Look at me! Look at me driving!" And, probably most importantly, she accepts truth in a way that Dream cannot. When they finally find Destruction and he explains that he will not return to his realm and make things as they were before, she simply says, "I thought you would," and it's over. She doesn't beg and she doesn't plead. It's simple for her. Perhaps craziness does make things simple.I'm finding it harder and harder to write frivilously about these books. Straub says, "If this isn't literature, nothing is," and he nails it. Of course, I am getting further and further from my "near instant reaction too." It's hard to find time to write AND read, but still, the themes are just too weighty. What started out simply has become a quagmire of great ideas, and I suppose that is what literature is: a quagmire of great ideas. Still, I must try (it is my passion after all).
  • (4/5)
    I've been wondering about the missing Endless for a while and my questions were finally answered :)
  • (5/5)
    If you think you can get through these easily because they're "just" comic books, you're probably wrong. It's taking me a surprisingly long time to get through a single volume now I'm thoroughly embroiled in the series.

    This volume stars Delirium and Dream, mostly. The other Endless all make their appearances, including the so far missing brother, Destruction, but it's mostly Dream and Delirium. Delirium is a really interesting character, and the implication that she might change again is interesting. Dream is growing up a bit, no matter what he thinks. The idea of one of the Endless abandoning their realm because they don't want their responsibilities is interesting: I assume it's going somewhere further than this.

    The conclusion to Orpheus' little character-arc is quite sad, really, but also fitting. And it was good to see more of Desire and Despair and to see them with complex feelings you wouldn't expect -- like missing their brother, and being scared of what's to come.
  • (5/5)
    Some three hundred years ago, Destruction of the Endless decided to leave his realm. Since then, humanity has unknowingly been in charge of their own destruction/construction (and doing just fine with it), and the rest of the family has respected his wishes of privacy. Now however, the loony kid sister Delirium has got it in her head that finding him might make everything better. After asking several of her siblings she comes to Dream, even though he scares her a bit. And Dream, presently spending his time getting over another ended love story by standing in the rain a lot, accepts to join her on her quest to find Destruction as a way of getting his mind off things. He has no intention of actually finding their lost brother. But in the end, not only does he do so, but has to make some rather crucial choices in the process.This is my favorite of the whole series, I think. The pieces regarding the Endless as a dysfunctional metafamily really start to fall into place and I revel in getting to know more of the other siblings’ realms and personalities. Despair, so tender in her quietly brutal way, is a big favorite of mine. But what really makes this book special is the dynamic between pompous, stern Dream and his sister Delirium. She’s floopy and corny and funny, but underneath it all so broken and dark, it just breaks your heart. And while the artwork is fine throughout this book, it’s really in the rendition of Delirium that Jill Thompson excels, giving her a body language and an everchanging look that really helps define this character. The quest is also full of Gaiman’s special brand of urban fantasy: Ishtar in a strip joint, a weird glimpse of Sami mythology, the ongoing fate of Orpheus and the late days of Egyptian Cat goddess Bast. My favorite part of this whole book is probably the beginning of chapter three, where Gaiman tilts the world and gives us a backdoor perspective on a miracle by saying that there are ”no more than about seventy people left on earth who still remember the dinosaurs”. He also intoduces a few more lovely characters to the large cast of this series – Barnabas the dog and Merv the bigmouthed pumpkin most notably. This is a perfect blend of adventure, violence (quite a bit of it in this one, mostly in text though), humor, myth and philosophy. And without stressing it at all, this volume is central to the overall arc of the series in a way that won’t be apparent until volume ten is finished. (How sneaky is that one panel flash forward!?) I haven’t used the word masterpiece yet in my reread of these books. I will now.
  • (5/5)
    This volume was wonderful. Much better than the last - much more of the Endless too. These books are always best when they have plenty of the Endless in them. Delirium annoyed me a little, but her interactions with Dream were priceless. The message of this volume was also something that really got you thinking. Very enjoyable!
  • (5/5)
    I know I am sounding like a broken record as I read through this series, raving as I do after each one, but truly, The Sandman Vol 7: Brief Lives is something special. The book tells one story, and what a story. This is a comprehensive look at the dysfunctional family of the Endless as youngest sister, Delirium, approaches her siblings to find someone to accompany her in a search for their missing brother, Destruction. This brother opted to drop out of the family and his responsibilities over 300 years ago. Dream is the only sibling to agree to accompany her. He goes not because he wants to find Destruction, but simply to take his mind off a failed love affair. My chief delight in this book was the character of Delirium. She brought to mind a hyper-active three year old with every thought that goes through her head popping out of her mouth. She is charming, humorous and I imagine rather tiring to be around after a while. And although her thoughts are scattered and seemingly random, every now and again she utters a simple truth with clarity and depth. She was the perfect foil to Dream with her spontaneity and child like wonder against his controlled quietness.From rundown strip clubs to ancient Greek temples, this story carries you along and all the while you are absorbing Gaiman’s philosophy on life, change and the gods that we hold above all. I have noticed in his work a recurring theme on these patterns of life and what happens to gods when they are no longer needed. Is immortality actually for forever or does it fade in the wake of non-belief.The Sandman Vol. 7: Brief Lives is quite simply a masterpiece and I can’t even begin to imagine what will follow. But I definitely have my fingers crossed for more Delirium and more Barnabas, another favorite character from this volume.
  • (5/5)
    In which Morpheus, the Dream King, the Sandman, is suffering from heartache and gives in to Delirium's request that he joins her in the search for their missing brother, Destruction. This is truly one of my favorite installments in the series (and I know I say this of all of them), not just because it's a fairly straight-forward quest-story and because we get to see so much of the Endless' separate domains, but because it is one of the funniest of them and has my favorite characters in it, foremost of whom is Barnabas, Destruction's sarcastic and funny and utterly wonderful canine companion ("Hey Schmuck, Devotion you've got. Perjury isn't in the job description.").Although sad, it's also quite lovely to see the change in Dream when it comes to his relationship with his son, especially considering what happened after Orpheus' wedding (before Dream's incarceration), described in the series installment directly preceding this one. This installment does read a little bit like the beginning of the end, with Destruction's departure and Dream's being almost willing to contemplate an alternative to himself, although I can't say if I thought so when I first read it, or if it's because I already know what is to come. Fantastic installment, though, with many mythological strands and loads of great jokes.
  • (5/5)
    Morpheus er lidt nedtrykt ovenpå en kærlighedsaffære, der er forbi. Delirium savner sin bror, Destruction, der har været væk siden ca 1666 - peståret. Dream drager med på hendes eftersøgen.Undervejs får de hjælp af folk, som det går ilde. Destruction har lagt lidt forhindringer i vejen.Man oplyses om at der er nogle sejlivede mennesker som har været her siden dinosauernes tid og endda før. Morpheus er tæt på at droppe eftersøgningen, men overtales alligevel. Han opsøger sin søn, Orpheus, der er et udødeligt hoved i et tempel på en græsk ø, og får hjælp.En gudinde Ishtar er danser, men har aldrig vist sit fulde talent. Det gør hun efter at have truffet Morpheus "bringing the house down" bogstaveligt talt.Morpheus og Delirium finder Destruction, som har brugt 300 år på at finde sig selv og forsøge at skabe ting. Destruction har en hund, Barnabus, der kan tale, men ikke taler pænt om de ting, som Destruction har forsøgt at skabe.Delirium overtager hunden og Destruction smutter igen, hvilket skuffer Delirium, der havde håbet at alt kunne blive som før.Dream forandrer sig i løbet af historien og bliver en smule rarere. Han lader sin søn Orpheus få fred som tak for hjælpen.Titlen går på at alle liv er korte, både menneskers, sejlivede menneskers, guders, og selv de Endless vil ikke leve evigt. I slutscenen ser vi Andros, en gammel mand, der har passet Orpheus hoved hele sit liv, betragte Orpheus' grav, vel vidende at han ikke selv vil leve et år mere udtale: "It is a beautiful day".Dvs grib dagen.Supergod fortælling, der er ramt lige i plet fra både fortæller og illustratorer.
  • (2/5)
    As this collection deals exclusively with the interaction of Gaiman's inhuman 'endless', the reader must come to terms with the fact that Gaiman has too little madness to write them. Delirium is particularly disappointing as her randomness becomes more and more predictable. Dream himself still comes off as your standard Gaiman protagonist, though Gaiman keeps using secondary characters to try to make us understand what amazing psychological changes he has undergone. It is almost the opposite of Chekhov, where we see the action and the emotional reaction is described to us.However, Gaiman is still a strong and mystical storyteller who draws from many sources. It is unfortunate that he tried to tackle such bizarre and complex characters without Blake's chemical madness to spur him on; but then again, any author with sufficient talent and drive will not be comprehended, and especially not by their most rabid fans (how telling is it that we require a qualifier for 'fanatic').
  • (5/5)
    This is the seventh graphic novel in Gaiman's Sandman series. The Sandman series is 10 graphic novels in length. This was a wonderful book. Absolutely loved the story and enjoyed the illustrations.In the seventh graphic novel in the Sandman series Morpheus's sister Delirium wants to go searching for her brother Destruction. After Desire and Despair refuse to help her she turns to Morpheus for help. Morpheus has just been abandoned by his girlfriend and is depressed and as such agrees to travel with Delirium in search of their brother Destruction. There travels take them to visit a number of long-lived humans and a few forgotten gods.If you are a Sandman fan then you will read this and love it. If you aren't well then you should start reading these graphic novels because they are awesome. The plotlines are creative and interesting as well as engaging. Sometimes the story gets a little bit ambiguous, but that just makes it more interesting. There is always a little black humor in these; especially in this book where Delirium likes to chat about whatever strikes her fancy. Of course the storyline always touches on deeper topics like the meaning of life, the origin of life, and the definition of gods.I really enjoyed this installment of the Sandman series and look forward to reading the next novel.
  • (4/5)
    After spending six volumes establishing the permanence and indispensability of the Endless, Gaiman reverses field in Brief Lives with a story that suggests that the Endless may not be necessary at all, and not being necessary, may not be eternal. The story itself takes the form of a travel tale, with Dream and Delirium setting out on the road (literally) in search of their long lost brother Destruction.[More forthcoming]