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Sandman, Band 1 - Präludien & Notturni

Sandman, Band 1 - Präludien & Notturni

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Sandman, Band 1 - Präludien & Notturni

Bewertungen:
4/5 (2,991 Bewertungen)
Länge:
241 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711457
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

SANDMAN ist die meistausgezeichnete Comic-Serie der Welt. Die umfangreiche Saga ist eine intelligente und spannende Mischung aus modernen Mythen und düsterer Fantasy, in die zeitgenössische Literatur, historisches Drama und Legenden eingewoben sind. Es sind Geschichten, die man nie vergisst. PRÄLUDIEN & NOTTURNI erzählt vom Herrscher jenes Reiches, in dem wir ein Drittel unseres Lebens verbringen. Alles beginnt im Jahre 1916, als der englische Magier Roderick Burgess den Versuch unternimmt, den Tod in persona, Death, zu fangen, aber stattdessen deren kleinen Bruder Dream erwischt. Beide gehören zu den Ewigen, unsterblichen Wesen, die vom Universum selbst geschaffen und mit verantwortungsvollen Aufgaben betraut wurden. Aber auch gottgleiche Geschöpfe machen Fehler und büßen dafür. PRÄLUDIEN & NOTTURNI ist das erste Buch aus der 10-bändigen SANDMAN-BIBLIOTHEK. Die SANDMAN-Bücher können sowohl in der Reihenfolge ihres Erscheinens als auch einzeln gelesen werden.
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711457
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of books for children and adults whose award-winning titles include Norse Mythology, American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), Coraline, and The Sandman graphic novels. Neil Gaiman is a Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR and Professor in the Arts at Bard College.


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Sandman, Band 1 - Präludien & Notturni - Neil Gaiman

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Was die anderen über Sandman, Band 1 - Präludien & Notturni denken

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2991 Bewertungen / 117 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    SYNOPSIS Morpheus patiently waits 70 years for an opportunity to escape. In that time, the Dreamlands decay and warp, and his tools of Dreaming are taken. A sleeping sickness spreads among mortals with worse in the offing. From this premise are spun two major plotlines (retribution for Morpheus's malefactors; and, recovery of his tools), and an episodic sideline hinting at the role Dream plays for humanity. IN THIS VOLUMEFrom the Endless: Dream Death cameo by DestinyFrom Dreamtime / Supernatural: Lucien Cain & Abel Brute & Glob Lucifer & Baalzebub Hecateae (Three-In-One)From DC: Constantine Dr Destiny Mr Miracle & Last Martian cameo by Sandman (or someone deluded) //Gaiman and his editor acknowledge in separate introductions that the issues collected in Volume 1 are a qualified success. Gaiman's achievement here is his integration of mythopoeic ideas within contemporary settings, and his willingness to mine all manner of genre settings and storylines. There is a lot of material here and the reader's sorting rules are uncertain. Individual stories are entertaining but seem unrelated and/or confusing. Perhaps the thematic obscurity lies more with the reader than with the story: upon re-reading (and after completing the next two volumes) the various threads and themes stand out in sharper relief, but these same pieces were not so evident on first reading. By Volume 3, the storylines converge. Gaiman is examining myriad ways that dreams serve human health, balance, and integrity, both for individuals and the community. At this point in Volume 1, the stories eclipse the themes. Perhaps that's only natural.//"Sleep of the Just"(Morpheus snared, then freed)Gaiman name-drops Horvendile from Cream of the Jest; for readers unfamiliar with Cabell's story this suggests the invocation of a demon or god."Imperfect Hosts"(concerning Morpheus's recovery)"Dream a Little Dream of Me"(concerning Morpheus's sand)Here is hinted a third major plotline, picked up in Volumes 2 & 3: the non-sanctioned efforts of some denizens of Dreaming. The creature that was once Rachel's father threatens Constantine but is cowed when realising Morpheus accompanies him. "A Hope in Hell" (concerning Morpheus's helm)"Passengers" "24 Hours" "Sound and Fury" (concerning Morpheus's ruby)1 story split over 3 issues, and another DC makeover, this time featuring Dr D and his materioptikon. Dr D relies upon Morpheus's ruby, not so much inventing a new tool as warping Morpheus's."Sound of Her Wings" (concerning Morpheus's role as one of the Endless)
  • (4/5)
    What a wild, dark and interesting ride. I can see why it comes so highly recommended. Great initiation of what I am sure will continue to be a fantastic story. Not for the faint of heart.
  • (5/5)
    First of all, I am not a comic book reader. I read some "Elfquest" books back in the early 00's, but that's the extent of my experience with the genre.

    But a good friend of mine recommended these, so I decided to give them a shot.

    And I absolutely, positively LOVED it. Like blown-away loved it. I never realized that comic books could have complex stories, interesting characters, and even a bit of a moral message. I guess I had fallen into the stereotypical belief that they were only for geeky fourteen-year old boys.

    I LOVED Morpheus, and even more than that, I loved Death - even though we don't meet her until the end. I hope there's more with both of them in later volumes.

    I can't wait to read the next one - the only downside being that these suckers are $20 each and there are twelve of them. Ugh.

  • (4/5)
    Neil Gaiman was known to me first as a children's book author, before I came into contact with his novels through a friend. I was enthusiastic and so came to the Sandman series, which did not disappoint likewise.
    A megalomaniacal cult leader tried to capture death, but instead ends up Dream, The Sandman in his captivity. People feel that something strange is going on, but no one is aware why. After a seemingly endless time The Sandman manages to escape and he begins to search for his gear ...
    The story is a wonderful melange of reality and mysticism, fantasy at its best, soon you realize how incredibly important for everybody individual dreams are. The accompanying images drawn in a congenial way simply to designate as a comic is a gross understatement. These are incredibly detailed pictures, down to the last tiny precise which exactly reflect the atmosphere and the content of the text. Some of the drawings could almost be described as paintings. I'm looking forward to the next books I will read and view in any case.
    With all the enthusiasm, why not the full score? Some of the stories seemed a little too intendendly, the inclusion of all the superheroes, for example. But eventually these are only trifles...
  • (3/5)
    The last time I read these, I stopped at this one. I remember liking it very much, but this time it feels a bit flat. The story should be compelling (Lucifer gives Hell to Dream to manage), but instead it is a bizarre parade of random gods and goddesses with no arch to the plot. I'm looking forward to reading further to see if this is just the beginning of a more compelling storyline.
  • (5/5)
    Great take on a old story like the Sandman. Gaiman THINKS about his stories and everything is so well constructed, especially his characters. It seems like a uber-Goth creation but in reality is clever, funny, sexy and tragic in a lot of ways. If you ever pick it up, never fail to read the Artist bios at the back; they are worth the perusal.
  • (4/5)
    I read Mists o Shadows in the 90's. I'm really looking forward to reading all of the Sandman series, even if I can only afford the trade compilations. Have your religion/mythology/occult knowledge handy, you'll need it. BTW, the Lucifer Vertigo series is very much in the same vein.
  • (4/5)
    I love Neil Gaiman's novels and short stories, but I've resisted reading the graphic novels because, well, I've perceived the graphic novel as a three year old younger brother to the novel. Having finally finished this first instalment of The Sandman I'm pleased to say that I was wrong and I really enjoyed the complexity of this story. I am looking forward to moving onto the second instalment in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Preludes & Nocturnes is the first volume of Neil Gaiman's Sandman series. While it serves as an adequate introduction to the story of Dream, it does not make for a stellar first impression. While the artwork (produced by three different artists) is beautiful and highly expressive, it is somewhat difficult to follow. The plot, while decent, is slow paced and sometimes encumbered by Gaiman's attempts to shoehorn in familiar comic book characters. Despite the issues I had with this volume, I found it imaginative and engrossing enough to want to continue reading the series.
  • (3/5)
    Not for young readers, to be sure. This was more horrific in places than I could enjoy. I did like the character Morpheus and the imaginative plot. I found it even suspenseful at times. The sibling of The Sandman was pretty great too. Very interesting references and ideas, I'll keep reading the series for awhile yet.
  • (4/5)
    While trying to summon Death, the leader of a mysterious order inadvertently captures Dream, imprisoning him for years. This wreaks havoc on the world as we know it, as Dream's tools are used by humans who have no way of coping with their power, and several people become infected with a "sleepy sickness." All Dream can think about is getting free - and then getting revenge.The first in the Sandman series is a little uneven, very creepy ("24 Hours" was downright scary), and I liked Dream and some of the other characters introduced. I'm definitely going to read the next book in the series to see how things develop.
  • (3/5)
    Intense plot has a secret society plotting to capture Death, but they capture Dream instead. When Dream escapes, he must find the tools of his trade and restore the world of dreams. Fantastic artwork, great tone and theme, only problem is the sometimes fragmented plot from issue to issue.
  • (4/5)
    A solid introduction, though it pales in comparison to later editions. Gaiman did better when he broke further away from the DC world and indulged his owh mythology to the fullest. "24 Hours", however, remains one of the creepiest things I've ever read.
  • (4/5)
    Just as the title suggests, this novel introduces the circumstances of what is going on, who is Dream, and what he can do.Dream is the lord of his Dreamworld. Although one would think that he would be cruel and merciless, he is actually logical and kind in his own way.A circle of men had attempted to ensnare Death so as to stop people from dying but had instead captured Dream, who waited for seventy years to escape his prison.When he escapes, he sees what his absence has done to the people of Earth. He sets off to find his tools of his trade... the items that contain his energy, his spirit. The first is on Earth and we meet some of the J.L.A. and Constantine. The next is in Hell, where Lucifer reigns with two other lords. The final is on Earth as well, but is in the hands of a sadistic lunatic. The final tool proves to be the most difficult to retrieve but is rewarding to Dream in ways than he could not have thought.
  • (4/5)
    Unbelievable! Gripped me from beginning to end. Awesome illustrations, but yet another insight into the frailty of the human mind and the tightrope of sanity we all walk. Can't wait to read the next volume
  • (2/5)

    Six out of ten. CBR format.

    Dream is imprisoned for decades by an occultist seeking immortality. Upon escaping, he must reclaim his objects of power while still in a weakened state, confronting an addict to his dream powder, the legions of Hell, and an all-powerful madman in the process.

  • (5/5)
    I know this series has been around quite awhile, but I am just now picking it up. I am so glad that I did. I absolutely loved this book. It was so innovative and interesting. Collected in this volume are several stories, that sometimes seem a little disjointed, but it all comes together by the end. Dream is a good character, but I loved some of the supporting cast. Cain and Abel have a very poignant storyline, and Death seems really cool. I can't wait to check out the next volume of this story to enter this world once again.
  • (5/5)
    the excellent beginning of probably the greatest stories ever told. Read it.
  • (3/5)
    Though it has its moments, this collection isn't really as good as the later volumes of Sandman. You can start here -- it's not a major time investment -- but it's only a hint at what's to come.
  • (5/5)
    This book marked my reluctant re-introduction to the world of comics, as I had been content reading novels and leaving the sometimes frustrating, always expensive world of monthly publications to the kids. I now have a 13 issue ongoing subscription to my local comic shop and graphic novels have started competing for space on my bookshelves. Thanks a lot Neil Gaiman...
  • (4/5)
    Although the weakest volume in the series, it ends with the story in which Gaiman finds his voice and the character of Morpheus the Dream-King comes sharply into focus. The rest of the series is wonderful, chilling, funny, tragic, hopeful and done just exactly right. Story telling of the best sort.
  • (4/5)
    Fabulous beginning but got worse later, get rid of superheros.
  • (4/5)
    A solid start to what is an amazing series. A comicbook for even the non-comicbook fan.
  • (3/5)
    I realize that this is the first graphic novel written, but I am not entirely sure what the ado is all about. It’s true that there are flickers of creativity and nice graphics there, but it is very much on the comic side. I may have to read others to really appreciate the genre.
  • (5/5)
    The one that starts us off.. i remember I had to get used to the storytelling, pacing, artwork.. and i had to get used to being confused about numerous things. Better the second time around, but really it's the one that hooked me. Indescribable really.
  • (4/5)
    a slightly disjointed, interesting compelling beginning to a wonderfully long series.
  • (5/5)
    This is a graphic novel for all those who doubt comic books as an art form. Period.
  • (4/5)
    It's not really the best of the series, but it's the first. I like the plot and all, but this doesn't really stand out to me. It's about Dream's awakening, and his attempt to get his old powers and relics back. His mask was placed in hell, and his ruby was taken by a crazy person (apparently a super-villain, but I just think of him as a crazy person). The issue in which Dream descends to Hell is my favorite, as it's dark, and beautifully written. It gets really disturbing as the crazy person uses the power of the ruby to make others harm and kill each other and themselves, all of it graphically depicted with the creepy artwork of the illustrator. It ends with the issue "The Sound of Her Wings," which introduces Death, Dream's sister, another of the endless. She's depicted as gothic (expected of one who embodies death), yet she's pretty perky and silly. She's a very cool character, and the final issue in this volume is wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    This is only the second graphic novel I've ever read, so I'm still getting used to the genre. I plowed through this one in a couple of hours during a slow night at work, and while it had some really interesting (and sometimes disturbing) storylines, something about it felt a little bit clunky.
  • (4/5)
    In the first volume of Neil Gaiman's seminal graphic novel series, the King of Dreams embarks on a quest to regain certain items of power stolen from him seventy years before.I've read this eight times now, and it still blows me straight out of the water. There's so much going on on so many different levels, and it can be read in several different ways. You want a simple quest tale? It's certainly that. Dream endures captivity, escapes, and travels through a series of stunning locations as he regains what is rightfully his. You want a horror story? Oooh boy, are you in the right place. Gaiman delivers a wide range of horror that is both shockingly graphic and deeply psychological. Or, how about a commentary on different kinds of storytelling? In his afterward, Gaiman states that he tried to make most of the stories conform to particular types. Literary buffs will enjoy evaluating the results.And if you want something smart, disturbing, uplifting, deep, epic, personal, complex, witty and dark, you need to read this. Right now.As good as it is, though, you'll want to make sure you have access to the remaining volumes in the series. Preludes and Nocturnes can be read as a stand-alone, but it's so much better when read as the first installment in a longer series. Gaiman uses this as a place to establish certain key things about Dream and his world. They don't stand out the first time through, but once you know what's coming you're sure to be impressed.To be fair, I ought to mention that it does have a few failings. The art is good but somewhat dated; you can instantly peg this as a late 80's/early 90's creation, at least in the original editions. (I believe Absolute Sandman has been retouched and recoloured; this might make a difference). Gaiman's attempts to incorporate the wider DC universe aren't entirely successful; some of the stories are a little awkward, though I never found them too insiderish. (I'm more of a Marvel girl; most of my DC knowledge relates to Sandman, and I never had any trouble following what was happening). It takes Gaiman most of the volume to find his voice, also; it's not until the final story, "The Sound of Her Wings", that the book really clicks.But despite all that, it's a solid read. I highly, highly recommend it. And when you're reading, just keep in mind that most people consider this mediocre in comparison to the rest of the series.