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Preacher, Band 1 - Der Anfang vom Ende

Preacher, Band 1 - Der Anfang vom Ende

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Preacher, Band 1 - Der Anfang vom Ende

Bewertungen:
4/5 (29 Bewertungen)
Länge:
217 Seiten
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711365
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Auf den ersten Blick sieht Reverend Jesse Custer nicht so aus, als sei er etwas Besonderes. Nur ein weiterer Pfarrer, dem allmählich seine Schäfchen und sein Glaube abhanden kommen. Aber bald soll er höchstpersönlich erfahren, dass Gott doch existiert. Und dass ER ein ziemlich mieser Drecksack ist. In einem einzigen, explosiven Moment ändert sich Jesses Leben ein für allemal. Und er ist sehr darauf aus zu erfahren, warum. Gemeinsam mit seiner Ex-Geliebten, der schießfreudigen Tulip, und einem saufenden irischen Vampir namens Cassidy beginnt er eine Odyssee, die ihn aus dem Herzen von Texas zur dunklen Seele von New York City führen wird – und weit darüber hinaus, um von der durch Abwesenheit glänzenden Gottheit Antworten zu bekommen. DER ANFANG VOM ENDE ist der erste Band der PREACHER-Saga, einer der höchstgelobten Comic-Serien der späten 90er-Jahre. Garth Ennis und Steve Dillon erzählen ein modernes amerikanisches Epos über Leben, Tod, Liebe und Erlösung, vollgepackt mit Sex, Schnaps, Blut und Blei – nicht zu vergessen Engeln, Dämonen, Gott, Vampiren und Perversen aller Couleur. Eine Geschichte wie ein sauberer Faustschlag in den Magen. Als Bonus enthält dieser Band Kommentare zum Entstehungsprozess und Hintergrundinformationen zu allen Titelbildern von Garth Ennis und Glenn Fabry. Band 1: Der Anfang vom Ende Band 2: Blut ist dicker Band 3: Sie kamen nach Masada Band 4: Für ein paar Leichen mehr Band 5: Stadt der Verdammten Band 6: Rivalen unter roter Sonne Band 7: Einsam sind die Tapferen Band 8: Bis zum letzten Atemzug Band 9: Abgerechnet wird zum Schluss
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736711365
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Garth Ennis has been writing comics since 1989. His credits include PREACHER (recently adapted into a hit TV show for AMC), THE BOYS, HITMAN, CROSSED, and the war comics series WAR STORIES and BATTLEFIELDS. He has also written successful runs on THE PUNISHER and FURY for Marvel Comics, and recently revived the classic British war character JOHNNY RED. Originally from Northern Ireland, Ennis now lives in New York City with his wife, Ruth.


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3.9
29 Bewertungen / 29 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Loved this so much I immediate went out and bought the next couple collections in the series. Fanf*ckingtastic. Cassidy is my favorite, hands down, but all the characters are really well drawn (literally and figuratively).
  • (4/5)
    I feel both guilty and a bit, er, dirty, but I can't stop laughing. I have gone and purchased the rest of the series, if only to find out what happens to one minor character. This was an interesting look at the power of religion, rather than the power of faith.
  • (5/5)
    This is the book that got me back into comics. I can't remember why the hell I picked this up my sophmore year at college since I hadn't read a comic book since I was 14. The giddy feeling and pure fun of this book is what keeps me reading: I am always looking to have that feeling again and it's elusive that makes the hunt all the more exciting.As far as the content, you either will enjoy this story about a Preacher imbued with the "voice of God" which enables him to command anyone to do anything. Trademark Garth Ennis-style violence and language (read: gratuitous), check. Even if you're a Christian (like myself who is of the born-again sort) you can really have a laugh with this book. You just gotta take it for what it is: really fun fiction. Plus the serialized/soap-opera style story keeps you reading for the next plot point.If this were a TV show, it'd be a mix of Deadwood, Rescue Me and Lost.
  • (4/5)
    Just started re-reading this - I've been meaning to do so for a while (since reading the rather rubbish da vinci code), but hadn't quite got round to it. Glad to see its just as gripping as the first time round
  • (5/5)
    although it doesn't quite reach sandman's peak, this series concerning Life and Death and God rank up there with the best. More twists than a chubby checkers groupie.
  • (4/5)
    Violent, sexy, painfully funny and very addictive. This series starts off well with Gone To Texas and just gets better and better with the progression of plot and character. Well written, very well drawn, and an interesting take on the topics of religion and faith.
  • (3/5)
    Though the storyline is fascinating, the writing seems very unpolished. The dialogue is especially stilted. Overall, the characters make it worth continuing on to the next collection in the series, which I hope to do shortly. Perhaps the writing will improve as the plot develops. I think I'm just spoiled after having read so much Gaiman and Alan Moore over the years. This is a far cry from From Hell or The Sandman, after all.
  • (3/5)
    Preacher, Vol. 1 wasn't bad, but it wasn't what I was expecting. When I see a book like this, I assume that it works as a cohesive book on its own, like Watchmen, Marvels, or The Dark Knight Returns. I expect a complete story which resolves by the end.

    Preacher Vol 1 is just the first 7 issues of Garth Ennis's preacher, and the 7 seems to have been chosen largely arbitrarily. A number of plot threads and characters introduced in the comics are not referenced again, and it kind of seems to meander all over the place.

    The plot resolved at the end of the book was only introduced a few "issues" prior, and the "main" antagonist disappears after 3 issues.

    I think if I had realized this was just 7 comic books glued together, I would have enjoyed this more, but as it is I was expecting a standalone comic novel, which isn't this.

    Overall, Preacher is a good comic, with a ton of borderline-excessive violence and an interesting and unique world. I'm glad I read it, but I doubt I'll read more.
  • (4/5)
    Trying to describe Gone to Texas is a bit like heading cats. You start with an atheist preacher, his vampire sidekick and ex-girlfriend on the run. Well, the atheist bit is a bit wrong, since he is carrying Genesis within him. Genesis is hard to explain and a major portion of the story, so let's just say that you'll learn that Heaven's working-class angels are quite upset that it's gone, God has been AWOL since it's taken up residence and the executive class decided to unleash the Saint of All Killers on the earth in an effort to retrieve it from Jessie Custer (our titular Preacher) by any means necessary.This is only about half the story. In this introduction, you receive hints that Jessie and Tulip's breakup story will involve more than a mundane "growing apart" tale. You find that his vampire friend, Cassiday, will lead them into adventures that will rival the one that they're on. You're introduced to a sad and tragic rival created out of a hastily used power. Did I mention that they have to find God?This is a shoot-'em-up graphic novel with gritty, hard and violent characters. Even the angels are hard-drinking and foul-mouthed. Of course, with a faith-lapsed, possessed Preacher searching for a being who deliberately disappeared a few thousand years ago standing between you and Armageddon...well, the mood fits.
  • (5/5)
    PREACHER, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon is a nine-volume comic about friendship, love and courage, encompassing a skewed but brilliant look at American history, righteous rage against religious dogma, vampires, drinking, cowboys, sex, swearing, violence, heart-stopping romance and swearing. It's a work of genius. I was recently asked to choose my five favourite books of all time: if the fact it's nine volumes long means that technically PREACHER would have to be all five plus another four, that would probably be fine with me.
  • (4/5)
    It wasn't what I was expecting, but admittedly I didn't know what to expect. I like the characters, especially Cassidy. Even though the background story is somewhat cliched, it still works, and the ongoing plot is new and fresh.
  • (4/5)
    Took me a long time to get around to reading this. When Preacher came out I was big into Hellblazer, and despite the similarities did not want to switch camps.
    But all in good time. Will be reading more of this asap.
  • (4/5)
    This was book one of a series I received as a donation to my Little Free Library, I flipped through the pages of this book and wondered who would ever read it as every page was filed with pictures of blood and gore. Then, as I usually do in the case of questionable books, I check what people wrote about it on LibraryThing. Lo! People actually liked it. So what do I do? I go back and start reading it. I tried to wade my way through the gratuitous blood, violence, blasphemy, and profanity to see what the book was really about. Some of it was way over my head. I wasn't following the story line. I was amazed at the art work which was incredibly detailed and well done. I set the book aside to give away.The next day, I took another peek at it, starting from where i left off on the previous day. Strange! I became absorbed in the story as soon as I figured out who was who and what each person was trying to do to the other people (except for the one person, Reaver Cleaver (haha!), who was intentionally devious. I was captured by this story and found some of it quite funny. I guess it was kind of dark humor, but it grabbed me anyway.Now, guess what? I found the last third of this book easy enough to understand and want to finish the whole seven-book series. Go figure!
  • (4/5)
    I'm assuming Mr. Ennis wrote this while he was in a asylum? Yea, yea I know I'm a little late to this party but usually supernatural horror isn't my thing. It IS my wife's thing so I got it "for her" as a gift, and as long as she already had it, I decided to read it (please don't compare me to Homer buying Marge a bowling ball with HIS name on it - I hate bowling).So I'm definitely hooked but I do have to say this feels pretty dated by now. It bears the stench of the 90's. For me that's okay because I was 26 when it came out, just curious if younger kids will have a problem with it. Also I'm not really a fan of Fabry's artistic style. I get it that they wanted a kind of rough, dirty, style to complement the rough dirty happenings in the book but I tend to like the smoother, shinier comic styles or the totally painted stuff.I'm giving it 4 stars because I loved Cassidy and the originality of the story. Also liked Officer Tool a lot and some of the dialogue was hilarious.I'm wondering whatever happened to the sheriff's deformed son? If he comes back don't tell me. They named him Arseface so I think he's coming back for revenge.
  • (5/5)
    Sick, slick, and utterly brilliant. Really didn't expect it to be as good as it was. If you have a twisted sense of humour, don't mind graphic violence, like the sound of a slightly insane Irish vampire, and you aren't easily offended, this is the graphic novel for you! Great characterisations, great plot, outstanding artwork. I just need to buy the rest now.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting concept... interesting characters... but... didn't grab me more than that. Perhaps it was just too overly hyped by my friends.
  • (5/5)
    The first volume of Preacher contains all the elements that make this series great. The trinity of Jesse Custer, Tulip, and Cassidy; insanely graphic, almost cartoon but still too too real violence; an awesomely vulgar sense of humor; angels; devils; God (or the lack thereof); the Saint of Killers; and John Wayne. Somehow, all that mixed together makes perfect sense. Oh, and Aresface, let's not forget him. Garth Ennis writes some very real characters and puts them in increasingly bizarre situations to see how they react. Steve Dillon's artwork is perfect for the story; the man knows how to draw him some gunshot injuries, let me tell you. At any rate, this series is of course not for the easily offended, but it is wicked good fun for the rest of us.
  • (5/5)
    I wasn't sure what to expect when I first picked up Preacher, I just knew that it was one of the Vertigo titles that everyone raved about and that the trade had Kevin Smith's recommendation right above the title. That was enough for me.This book is fantastically written. There is so much dark humor, crass language, and graphic violence that I'm surprised I didn't hear more about it from the people who usually boycott things like that, especially in a comic book. Kudos to Garth Ennis for pulling off such a brilliantly dark book and to Steve Dillon for not holding back on the gory details.I cannot wait to see where this is going.
  • (4/5)
    Husband: "You should read Preacher, I think you'd really like it."
    Me: "Oh yeah? What's it about?"
    Husband: "...well, it's, uh, hmmm...it's a western?"
    Me: "You can't blurb it for me?"
    Husband: "Not really, no. Just read it."

    A few hours later...

    Me: "So lemme get this straight. We have Jesse Custer, the Preacher, who's been possessed by some sort of nigh-omnipotent heavenly power and has the spirit of John Wayne as his guardian angel, Cassidy, who's basically Shane McGowan the vampire, and Tulip, the mob-connected hit woman and Jesse's ex-girlfriend all off on a mission to literally find God?"
    Husband: "Yup."
    Me: "That's just insane."
    Husband: "Maybe."
    Me: "Be a dear and grab me volume two, if you would be so kind..."
  • (4/5)
    Not what I expected at all. I was suggested this graphic novel by a few people through the years and just never managed to pick a copy up until now. Very captivating, face paced and engrossing. I read it cover to cover in one sitting as soon as I managed to get going. Definitely picking up the next volume.
  • (4/5)
    Accidentally possessed by a supernatural creature, ex-preacher Jesse teams up with his former girlfriend and an Irish vampire to journey across the US in order to find, quite literally, the God who has abandoned Heaven. I have to say, I was somewhat baffled by this in the beginning, but very soon begun to love it, mainly because, despite the blood and gore and violence, Jesse is inherently a very moral character (albeit with slightly iffy ethics) and he has a lot to say without getting preachy (no pun intended). It's very clever without getting pretentious and also extremely funny - the characters are really carrying their weight in that sense. Looking forward to continuing the series.
  • (1/5)
    Reading this comic made me feel sick and a bit dirty. Ennis seems to feel that by adding as much violence, bodily fluids, rape and gore as possible, he'll achieve a gritty, realistic feel. Instead, he just makes himself look like a sick-minded poseur.
  • (3/5)
    While I feel that this is extremely well executed and thought-provoking, this is definitely at the far violent and graphic edges of my taste. Foul language? Yep. Sex? Yep. Over-the-top violence? Yep. I read books with all of these things included, but in a graphic novel they have an even higher impact. A strong stomach and a tolerance for less than reverent depictions of religion are both needed, but if you can handle it, I would highly recommend this series. This first volume really sets the stage for the series as a whole and introduces us to the three main characters - Jesse, who has the Word of God on his side (sort of), Tulip his gun-toting ex-girlfriend, and Cassidy, an Irish vampire. Fun and funny in places as well.
  • (3/5)
    Volume One introduces Reverend Jesse Custer (a small town minister who has merged with a half demon, half angel being called Genesis), Tulip (Jesse's gun toting ex-girlfriend), and Cassidy (a drunken Irish vampire). After a disaster in Texas, the three find themselves on the run from both the redneck police and a ruthless immortal called the Saint of Killers. I was a bit torn on this one, because while I liked the concept and ideas and the plot, most of the character were unlikeable (lots of Texans spouting vile racism and sexism) and extreme brutality (some of which didn't seem to serve a purpose other than shocking the reader). Even the main characters I had a hard time liking and only began to find interest in what happened to them toward the end. The art I liked fine (and it suits the tone of the story well), but the structure at the beginning rang artificial. I think that if I didn't happen to already have Volume Two sitting in front of me, I might not have bothered with continuing.
  • (1/5)
    I'd heard good things about this series, but I was disappointed. I guess this just didn't interest me for whatever reason.
  • (4/5)
    Spastically violent, ridiculously profane, and just a bit too cool. The first volume collects the first seven issues of DC's bleeding-edge Vertigo title, and while it meanders off into a B-plot tangent in the second half, it at least buttons itself up by the end to make for an above-average climax and conclusion. The book(s) really shine, however, with Ennis' slick writing, oddly capturing the moseying dialogue of Texas, an even greater feat considering he's from Ireland.
  • (3/5)
    I'd have to agree with one of the responses in the letters page that Ennis is never as revolutionary as he seems to imagine himself. Cursing is really an art, and while Ennis is a proficient user, he's really not masterful enough to make it beautiful. He's had to study it with some care and made an admirable transition from Irish to Southern U.S. (which may not seem a drastic change in volume, but is a world apart in vernacular).After reading Morrison's Invisibles, it is a sweet blessing to find someone with a mind for coherent storytelling. Even his flashbacks and cuts seem reasonable and driven. Then again, there is a smidge more action in Preacher, and a lot fewer unrelated tangents.
  • (5/5)
    It reminds me of some elements of my childhood. The religious symbolic nature of the story is awe-taking. A great series.
  • (5/5)
    I love it!